Sep 27, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Food Science and Nutrition

  
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    FSN 425 - Contemporary Issues in the Food Industry


    A writing intensive and discussion based course on current topics and recent developments affecting the food industry.  Includes readings, research, and discussion.   Students prepare position papers, a non-technical paper for a lay audience, and a major research paper over the course of the semester.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: FSN 330.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    FSN 430 - Counseling and Diet Therapy


    Nutrition counseling theory and techniques including patient interviews and diet education sessions. Calculate diet modifications for different disease states. Develop patient education materials.

    Prerequisites: FSN 301

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    FSN 436 - Food Law


    Examination and discussion of federal and state laws and regulations applying to the processing, handling, distribution and serving of food products.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    FSN 438 - Food Microbiology


    Examines the importance of microorganisms in food processing, spoilage, and preservation; the role of microorganisms in fermentation and production of protein, enzymes, and other products; food as a vehicle of infection and intoxication.  FSN 438 and FSN 528 cannot both be taken for credit.  Lec 3

    Prerequisites: BMB 300.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years.

    Credits: 3
  
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    FSN 439 - Food Microbiology Laboratory


    This course contains a series of experiments to allow students to perform and observe fundamental principles and practices of food microbiology.  Students will work in the lab to execute the exact procedure utilized by the USDA/FDA for the detection and enumeration of microorganisms in food.  FSN 439 and FSN 529 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: BMB 305 and Food Science Concentration

    Corequisites: FSN 438

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years.

    Credits: 2
  
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    FSN 440 - Utilization of Aquatic Food Resources


    Utilization and food quality of wild and farmed aquatic animals including production, chemical/physical properties, nutritional value, post-harvest changes, processing systems, regulatory issues, by-product utilization and food safety. FSN 440 and FSN 545 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FSN 450 - Food Biotechnology


    Introduction to methods and tools applied to the production of biotechnology-derived foods and food ingredients. Discussion of food safety, product quality, consumer acceptance, regulatory oversight and ethical issues regarding the use of biotechnology to enhance the food supply. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FSN 482 - Food Chemistry


    Study of the composition, structure, and properties of foods and chemical changes occurring during processing and utilization. Lec 3. FSN 482 and FSN 580 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: BMB 322 or BMB 360 or CHY 252

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FSN 483 - Food Chemistry Laboratory


    Laboratory exercises covering the principles presented in FSN 482. Lab 3.

    Corequisites: FSN 482

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 1
  
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    FSN 485 - Introduction to Food Engineering Principles


    Principles of biological and physical sciences related to food processing systems.  General concepts of fluid flow, mass and energy balances, heat transfer, refrigeration, freezing, and psychrometrics.  Overview of current practices in food engineering, with specific food industry examples. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    Prerequisites: FSN 330 and junior standing within the FSN major, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FSN 486 - Food Engineering Laboratory


    Principles of biological and physical sciences related to food processing systems, concepts of materials and energy balances, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer, use of engineering principles in design of the processes and equipment for processing and preservation of food products.

    Corequisites: FSN 485.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 1
  
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    FSN 489 - Senior Project in Food Science and Human Nutrition


    A research project will be conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. Written reports and an oral presentation of results are required.
     

    Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar

Franco American Studies

  
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    FAS 101 - Introduction to Franco American Studies


    Introduces students to the French cultures of the United States, emphasizing the peoples of Maine and the Northeast region. Examines European origins and later migrations, the impact of gender and class, the social significance of language, individual and collective expression, the effects of assimilation and the challenges faced today. Taught in English; no knowledge of the French language is presumed.

    General Education Requirements: Social Context and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    FAS 120 - People, Places and Pasts


    Introduces the cultural geography of Franco America.  Investigates how heritage links to place with particular emphasis on gender, class, and ethnicity.  Includes a field trip to a Franco American community.  Run as a seminar, with no prerequisites or knowledge of French or the Franco American community required.

    General Education Requirements:  Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    FAS 170 - Transnational Beat, Jack Kerouac


    Jack Kerouac has often been studied as the quintessential American writer.  Yet Jack Kerouac was the son of French Canadian immigrants, spoke only French until he was six, wrote an early draft of his famous On the Road in French, sprinkled passages in French throughout all his writing and cited French writers as important inspirations.  This course will explore the ways in which Kerouac straddle cultures and how this transnationalism infects, determines and interrupts both the content and the style of his writings.  We will read excerpts of Kerouac’s lesser-known writings, some of his writings in French (in translation) and of course parts of On the Road.  This class will run as a seminar; no prior knowledge of French is required.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    FAS 200 - SL: Primary Sources in Franco American Studies


    This service-learning course prepares students to build print or digital information resources using primary source materials in Franco American Studies.  Course readings introduce students to theories and methods of archival practice, and to ethical issues surrounding the creation and use of human records.  Students engage these issues in the context of Franco American writing and scholarship, and consider the ways archives and archival materials impact an exploration of Franco American cultural identity.  FAS 101 is recommended but not required.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Social Context and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    FAS 240 - French Exploration and Settlement of Maine, 1604-1760


    The names and traces of the early French explorers and settlers remain on in many place names along the Maine Coast, including the names of mountains and hiking trails in Acadia National Park, such as Champlain, St. Sauveur, Sieur de Mons, etc.  This course examines the history of the French exploration and settlement of Maine and places the French settlement of Maine in the broader geopolitical context of the settlement of North America.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    FAS 270 - Immigration, Yesterday and Today


    This course will use French Canadian immigration to the United States to explore key issues in today’s debates about immigration.  We will look at the similarities and differences between the two great waves of immigration, focusing on three key areas at the core of migration debates:  rights, citizenship, and migration policy; the second generation; diasporas and transnationalism.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    FAS 329 - Topics in Franco American Studies


    Focuses on themes and issues drawn from, or related to, the history, traditions, and contemporary experience of the Franco American community of Maine and the northeast region.

    Prerequisites: FAS 101 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    FAS 400 - Internship in Franco American Studies


    This Franco American Studies course provides opportunities for students to complete and reflect upon an internship with archives and archival materials.  Students with an interest in cultural heritage preservation, library and information studies, archival science, public history, or Franco American Studies will undertake various duties in the discovery, organization, cataloging, and overall stewardship of Franco American cultural materials for the completion of an internship.  In partnership with their internship cohort and instructor, they will use this course to evaluate and reflect upon these duties, the materials they encounter, and the learned skills they can deploy in their professional lives.  Specific internship duties will change from semester to semester; the course’s structure of evaluation and reflection will not.  This internship course is open to all students and requires the completion of tasks in person at one or another UMS campus, at a separate agreed upon location, at a distance, or any combination of these in close consultation with the instructor.

    Prerequisites: Any FAS course or permission of the instructor

    Course Typically Offered: Spring and Summer

    Credits: 1-2
  
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    FAS 442 - French Language of North America


    A historical, linguistic, and sociolingustic approach to the study of the varieties of French spoken in Acadie, Quebec, New England, and Louisiana.  Emphasis on the phonetic system, morphology, syntax, and lexicon in order to understand the present state of these varieties of French.  Research in the areas of the spoken and/or written language.  This course is identical to FRE 442 and is taught in French.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 310 or FRE 320 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    FAS 459 - Colonial Canada


    Studies Canada’s history from New France to 1850, emphasizing political, social and economic developments and relations with the American people. (This course is identical to HTY 459.)

    Prerequisites: HTY 103 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

French

  
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    FRE 101 - Elementary French I


    A systematic study of the basics of the French language. Equal emphasis is placed on developing reading, comprehension, speaking and writing skills. For students with no previous study of French or fewer than two years in high school.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 3 - 4
  
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    FRE 102 - Elementary French II


    Continued study of the basics of the French language with equal emphasis on developing reading, comprehension, speaking and writing skills. For students with no previous study of French or fewer than two years in high school.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 101 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3 - 4
  
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    FRE 117 - Accelerated French I


    An intensive, systematic study of the French language at the beginning level that provides the equivalent of two semesters of beginning French (FRE 101 and 102).  For students with no previous study of French or fewer than two years in high school.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 6
  
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    FRE 201 - Intermediate French I


    An integrated approach. Audio-visual materials and reading texts of a literary and/or cultural nature will be employed to strengthen comprehension, reading, writing, and speaking.  Includes a systematic but gradual review of the essentials of French grammar.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 102 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3 - 4
  
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    FRE 202 - Intermediate French II


    A continuation of FRE 201  using audio-visual materials and reading texts of a literary and/or cultural nature to strengthen comprehension, reading, writing, and speaking.  Includes a systematic but gradual review of the essentials of French grammar.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 201

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3 - 4
  
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    FRE 218 - Accelerated French II


    A continuation of FRE 117 - Accelerated French I.  A multi-media, intensive study of French language and culture that develops speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills.  Equivalent to two semesters of intermediate French (FRE 201 and 202).

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 117.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 6
  
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    FRE 305 - French Conversation and Composition: Social Issues


    Systematic training in the correct usage of spoken and written French through a broad range of conversational situations and writing topics focusing on social issues.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: FRE 202 or  FRE 218 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 306 - French Conversation and Composition: Global Issues


    Systematic training in the correct usage of spoken and written French through a broad range of conversational situations and writing topics focusing on global issues. Continued training in the correct usage of spoken and written French.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: FRE 202 or FRE 218 or equivalent

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 307 - French for Business


     

    For students of business, international affairs or related careers. Focuses on the development of vocabulary and the improvement of oral proficiency in business and social settings applied to various francophone settings. Applies technology to education by basing itself on a video textbook and requiring regular use of the Internet as a source of reading and information.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 202 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

  
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    FRE 309 - Readings in French Literature


    Practice in reading French. Also prepares students for literature and civilization courses at the 400 level. Discussion in French.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 202 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 310 - Readings in Francophone Literature


    Practice in reading and discussion in French with an emphasis on the French-speaking world beyond France.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 305 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 315 - Advanced French Conversation


    Oral practice for the advanced language student. Course work revolves around the discussion of cultural and intellectual issues, as well as current political and social events, with a view toward increasing idiomatic and abstract vocabulary.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 305 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 320 - French Pronunciation


    A formal study of the French sound system with considerable practice in phonetic transcription. Practical and remedial work in pronunciation.

    Prerequisites: FRE 202 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 350 - Multidisciplinary Readings in French


    Intended to be taken in conjunction with a course from another department, this course supplements the content areas of the course to which it is attached and promotes increased proficiency in French through reading and discussion in French. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 202 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1
  
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    FRE 400 - Advanced French Grammar


    An exposition of grammatical and syntactical principles through conceptual presentations along with demonstrations and practice through exercises.  Designed to enhance French language competency.  This course may be offered online.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 305 or FRE 306 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 401 - Translation and Comparative Stylistics


    An exposition of the principles of translation and comparative stylistics with practice via exercises and the translation of texts in both English and French.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: FRE 400 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 407 - 19th Century French Literature


    Readings of major 19th century figures, including Balzac, Sand, Hugo, Flaubert, Zola, and Baudelaire, with particular attention to social and philosophical themes as well as concepts of language and genre.

    May be repeated for credit, the course content may vary.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 309 or FRE 310 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

  
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    FRE 408 - Twentieth Century French Literature


    Readings in the novel, poetry or drama (content varies.) May be repeated for credit, with permission of instructor.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 309 or FRE 310 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 413 - Advanced Composition and Stylistics


    An exposition of the fundamentals of French stylistics with practice of these principles via compositions and exercises. Designed to enhance competence in written idiomatic French.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: FRE 400 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 430 - French Film Survey


    A survey of French cinema from its origins to the present, with an emphasis on understanding film as a narrative form.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: FRE 309 or FRE 310 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 442 - French Language of North America


    A historical, linguistic, and sociolingustic approach to the study of the varieties of French spoken in Acadie, Quebec, New England, and Louisiana.  Emphasis on the phonetic system, morphology, syntax, and lexicon in order to understand the present state of these varieties of French.  Research in the areas of the spoken and/or written language.  This course is identical to FRE 442 and is taught in French.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 310 or FRE 320 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 463 - Quebec Poetry


    A survey of Quebec poetry from the 19th century to the present, focusing on language, theme, socio-historical and political context, ideology and Quebec identity.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: FRE 309 or FRE 310 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 464 - Quebec Theatre


    A survey of Quebec from the 1940’s to the present, focusing on language, theme, character, theatricality, socio-historical and political context, ideology and Quebec identity.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: FRE 309 or FRE 310 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 465 - North American French Novel


     

    A survey of francophone novels written in North America in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing on the history and cultural identity of Acadia, Quebec, and New England’s Franco Americans.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 309 or FRE 310 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

  
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    FRE 490 - Advanced Topics in French


    Advanced Topics in French and French-Canadian literature  or linguistics may include: contemporary cinema, surrealism, contemporary French thought, modern French critical theory, linguistics, sociolinguistics, semiotics, symbolism, literature of commitment, images of women, and women writers.  Topics vary.  May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: FRE 309 or FRE 310 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    FRE 495 - Senior Project in French


    Capstone Experience in which majors in French and in International Affairs with a concentration in French, or in Cultures, Languages and the Humanities, apply language skills and knowledge gained from all prior language study.  Students work closely with a faculty advisor on an approved project and give a public presentation of the project in French.   When taken as a stand-alone course, the coursework will reflect the work of three credit hours, regardless of number of credits taken.  When taken in conjunction with another French course at the 400 level, the course will carry no credit and will be graded Pass/Fail only.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, Western Cultural Tradition and Capstone Experience

    Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 0-3
  
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    FRE 498 - Independent Projects II


    No description available.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1-3

General Engineering

  
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    GEE 103 - Introduction to Pre-Engineering


    This course is intended for students entering the Explorations Pre-Engineering Program. The course provides an introduction to different engineering programs including Chemical and Bioengineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Engineering Physics, Mechanical Engineering, and Engineering Technology. The course also familiarizes students with building skills in the use of information and University resources.

    Prerequisites: Must be an Explorations Pre-Engineering student.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    GEE 105 - Introduction to Engineering


    An introduction to University life, and the different programs available in the College of Engineering. Emphasis on building skills in the use of information and University resources.

     (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Engineering Undecided and General Engineering Undecided first semester, first-year student.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1

  
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    GEE 230 - Introduction to Engineering Leadership and Management


    Introduction to principles of leadership and management with applications to the engineering work environment.  Topics include: definition of leadership and management, motivation, importance of communication, decision making, team building, self-assessment, professional responsibility and ethics.  Guest speakers will emphasize the importance of leadership and management skills to career advancement and the competitiveness of the U.S. economy.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    GEE 250 - Sustainable Solutions in the Developing World


    An exploration of the fundamental principles and strategies necessary to implement sustainable service projects in the developing world.  Examines the social, cultural and ecological impacts of past humanitarian projects and develops an understanding of their influence on the human population and the environment.  Course content will be covered through lecture, discussions, case-studies and peer presentations.  Students will apply their skills to develop real-world solutions for the current UMaine Engineers Without Borders (UM-EWB) project.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    GEE 398 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Topics will vary from semester to semester.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: Ar
  
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    GEE 430 - Engineering Leadership and Management Internship


    Interns are placed in an engineering mill/plant, consulting services agency, or supplier business, on a full-time basis for one semester, and develop new skills and a greater understanding of the nature of leadership through their experience.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    GEE 486 - Advanced Project Management


    Course covers a wide range of project management topics including project planning, controlling, scheduling, and risk analysis.  Through lecture and case studies, students will be prepared to become project management professionals and will learn to bring projects to successful completion.  The course also emphasizes the human-relations aspects of project management such as team theory and personnel conflict resolution.  Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    GEE 490 - Interdisciplinary Capstone Exploration


    Offers engineering Juniors an opportunity to meet with faculty and other students to explore the development of a capstone project involving more than one engineering major.  Project ideas will be examined with a focus on establishing teams, project objectives, and authorization to proceed as a capstone project.  (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1

Geography

  
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    GEO 100 - World Geography


    Introduces students to the major world cultural regions and their characteristics, development and interaction.  It focuses particularly on the relationship between cultural groups and the environment within and between each region.  Students will be challenged to acquire factual knowledge of cultural regions necessary for geographic literacy and to critically evaluate explanations of these patterns.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Population and the Environment Requirements.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    GEO 212 - Geography of Maine


    This course provides a geographical perspective on the historical development of Maine over the last 500 years.  The course begins with European contact in the early 1500s, and then examines the evolution of Maine as a borderland during the colonial period, the American settlement of Maine in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the growth of industrial manufacturing and tourism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the de-industrialization and development of a service economy in Maine today.  The course pays particular attention to environmental, cultural, and cross-border issues.  (GEO 212 and HTY 212 are identical courses.)

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    GEO 265 - The Power of Maps


    Humans have been making maps for thousands of years, but never before were maps as present in everyday life as they are today.  Just think of the GPS in cars and the locator apps on our phones. It is more important than ever that we understand maps, how they are made, and how they have shaped society, from guiding imperial expansion to influencing urban development, land use, tourism, and surveillance.  This course teaches students the history of maps and map-making from the first rock carvings of ancient cities to Google Earth and smart bombs. Major topics will include how maps have been essential tools for government, warfare, territorial control, social and economic planning, and artistic expression. We will explore how map-making technology has changed over time, the drive for increasing accuracy, and how the design of maps reflects the cultures that produce them.  Students will also learn how to make their own maps to tell a spatial historical narrative.  Most broadly, this course will teach students how to read maps as rich documents that are fascinating windows on the past.  If this course was taken under as a topics course in HTY 398, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Artistic and Creative Expressions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    GEO 275 - Geography of Globalization


    Examines changing demographic, economic, political, and cultural connections across the globe over the past 500 years; their representation through maps; and our current awareness of the globe and the Earth’s environment. (GEO 275 and HTY 275 are identical courses.)

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    GEO 311 - Geography of Climate Change


    Introduces students to theories of environmental sustainability transitions and resource use in the context of climate change.

    Prerequisites: Any ANT or GEO course or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    GEO 349 - Early Modern North America in Atlantic Perspective


    Reflecting the increasing globalization of modern society, this course employs an Atlantic perspective to understand the international history of early modern North America. Focuses on the geography of the European empires that shaped North America, beginning with the Spanish and the French, and then focusing on the British and the revolt of the American colonies.  (GEO 349 and HTY 349 are identical courses.)

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

German

  
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    GER 101 - Elementary German I


    The basics of the German language. Emphasis on developing reading, comprehension, speaking and writing skills. For students with no previous study of German or fewer than two years in high school.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3 - 4
  
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    GER 102 - Elementary German II


    Continued study of the basics of the German Language. Emphasis on developing reading, comprehension, speaking and writing skills. For students with no previous study of German or fewer than two years in high school.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: GER 101 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    GER 203 - Intermediate German I


    An integrated approach. Reading texts as well as various audiovisual materials will be employed to strengthen reading, writing and especially speaking and comprehension skills. Includes a systematic but gradual review of the essentials of German grammar.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: GER 102 or GER 121 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    GER 204 - Intermediate German II


    A continuation of GER 203. Designed to strengthen reading, writing, speaking and comprehension skills.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: GER 203 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3 - 4

Hebrew

  
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    HBR 101 - Beginning Modern Hebrew


    A systematic study of the basics of the Hebrew language. Equal emphasis is placed on developing reading, listening comprehension, speaking and writing skills. For students with minimal or no previous knowledge of Modern Hebrew.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HBR 102 - Beginning Modern Hebrew II


    Continued study of the basics of the Hebrew language, with equal emphasis on developing reading, listening comprehension, speaking and writing skills. Continued discussion of Hebrew as an expression of Jewish culture in Israel and the United States. For students with one semester study of Hebrew or the equivalent as determined through consultation with the instructor.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: HBR 101 or equivalent

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

History

  
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    HTY 103 - Creating America to 1877


    Examines interactions of the many peoples who created the United States. Topics include Native Americans, the American Revolution, and Civil War, and how colonization, immigration, gender, race, politics, class, and geography shaped the nation.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 104 - United States History Since 1877


    A survey of main themes of U.S history from 1877 to the present. The course may include an emphasis on political, social, economic, intellectual, and technological aspects of the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, WWI, the interwar era, WWII, the Cold War, and post-Cold War era.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 105 - History of Ancient and Medieval Europe


    This survey explores the political, economic, social and intellectual developments in Europe from antiquity to 1715, emphasizing those features which help to explain our present-day civilization.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 106 - History of Modern Europe


    This class surveys the intellectual, social, economic, and political changes that shaped the development of Europe from 1715 to the present.  Topics may include the French and the Industrial Revolutions; nationalism and the emergence of nation states; the rise of Marxism; high imperialism; the two world wars; totalitarian governments of the 20th century; comparative histories of everyday life; and European integration.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 107 - East Asian Civilization


    A survey of China’s and Japan’s social, economic, cultural and political life from prehistoric times to the present. Whenever applicable, Korea and Vietnam will be discussed. Emphasis on key periods in each country, especially changes in the 19th and 20th centuries.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 108 - India: Identities and Changes


    A survey of the social, economic, cultural and political life of India from prehistoric times to the present. Key periods, especially since the later half of the 19th century, and main themes will be emphasized.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 130 - Craft of Historical Detection


    This course introduces students to the “detective work” involved in historical inquiry using a single case study or historical controversy. (Case study or controversy will vary depending on the instructor). The course is also a “first-year success course” designed to help students develop effective study and academic skills.  It can be used by history majors or potential history majors to meet the one credit LAS 150 requirement and also fulfills a history requirement.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 199 - Problems in History


    An analysis of a selected controversial or contemporary historical problem. In some cases the specific topic and methodology may be chosen jointly by interested students and an instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 202 - Medieval Civilization


    What were the Middle Ages in the middle of?  How did “medieval” become synonymous with “ignorant” and “barbaric”? These questions will be on our minds as we survey European history from the late Roman Empire through the fifteenth century, examining developments in political, religious, and cultural fields.  Even as we aspire to cover huge swaths of geography and history, we will also pause to investigate individual case studies and telling details.  Eschewing caricature and conventional wisdom, we will explore the many varieties of medieval civilization, emphasizing the complex lessons and legacies that this period offers for the modern world.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Western Cultural Tradition

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 210 - History of Maine


    A survey of Maine’s social, economic, and political life, from primitive times to the present. After a brief study of Native American life preceding white settlement, the periods of colonial, provincial, and state history are covered.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: No-first-year students.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 211 - Maine and the Sea


    An overview of Maine maritime history from aboriginal uses through the current state of maritime Maine.  Emphasis on the coast’s history, inland Maine’s relationship with the sea, Maine’s maritime relationship to the world, and current historical and archaeological research.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 212 - Geography of Maine


    This course provides a geographical perspective on the historical development of Maine over the last 500 years.  The course begins with European contact in the early 1500s, and then examines the evolution of Maine as a borderland during the colonial period, the American settlement of Maine in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the growth of industrial manufacturing and tourism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the de-industrialization and development of a service economy in Maine today.  The course pays particular attention to environmental, cultural, and cross-border issues.  (GEO 212 and HTY 212 are identical courses.)

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 213 - History of the Maine Woods


    This course will survey the history of the Maine woods from postglacial times to the present. Topics include alterations in the forest ecology, Native American and colonial settlement, and changing economic, industrial, and recreational uses of the woods. The course will also explore the varieties of spiritual and literary interpretations ascribed to the forest environment.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Population and Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 218 - History of Film


    Global history of film with emphasis on the cultural, technological, and philosophical sources of film in the 20th century.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 220 - North American Indian History


    An introductory history of North American Indians, from before European contact to the present. Within a broad chronological framework, the course will look at critical themes in American Indian history; American Indians prior to contact; cultural contact; treaty making, treaty rights, sovereignty; impact of government policies on Native populations; and contemporary issues.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 221 - History and Comics


    This course provides a concise introduction to the field of comics studies, and then relies on the comics medium to acquaint students with some of the major topics and themes that are commonly encountered in the discipline of history. Comics are highly accessible and foster active engagement, making it a powerful medium through which to experience the discipline of history. In particular, we will be examining comics as historical documents, but also as a medium for historical analysis. Students will develop the intellectual tools, as they relate to the field of comics studies, required to interpret and criticize the content and meaning of a range of comics materials from the past and present. While it is impossible to cover the whole of the discipline of history, students will be introduced to a wide and varied selection of subject matter, including politics and political discourse, armed conflicts and mass atrocities, nature and the environment, race and ethnicity, Indigenous peoples, labor and the working class, and gender.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 222 - Maine Indian History in the Twentieth Century


    Too often Native people are relegated to the distant past, leading society to have misunderstandings about indigenous communities today. This course introduces students Wabanaki history of Maine and eastern Canada in the twentieth century. The term “Wabanaki” is an all-inclusive term that refers primarily to Mi’kmaqs, Maliseets, Passamaquoddies, and Penobscots, along with other Abenaki groups. The tribal homeland encompasses present-day northern New England, the Maritime Provinces, and southern Quebec. We will explore the variety of ways Wabanaki experiences deviated from the national narrative on American Indians and examine when Native challenges were in lockstep with western tribes in the twentieth century. This course considers the interplay between cultural traditions and modernity. The regional scope highlights local developments. We will investigate prominent themes of resistance, accommodation, activism, sovereignty, and cultural survival. Wabanaki people were positive actors in their own affairs, not passive pawns subdued by forces beyond their control. This course will provide context to contemporary challenges Wabanaki people confront. As one tribal historian astutely noted, “I can never give up hope, as my ancestors never gave up hope.”

    HTY 222 and NAS 230 are identical courses.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

  
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    HTY 235 - Heresy, Witchcraft, and Reform


    This course will examine the definition and repression of heresy and witchcraft in Europe from late antiquity through the seventeenth century. Focusing on issues surrounding gender, belief, and otherness, we will spend time reading and thinking about the meanings of religious dissent and orthodoxy in premodern contexts. Our investigation will center on the ways in which efforts to reform the Church were closely connected to campaigns against its imagined internal enemies.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Context and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 240 - Creation of the Atlantic World, 1450-1888


    This entry-level course uses a comparative transnational perspective to understand the formation of an integrated early modern world in the region connected by the Atlantic Ocean. Selected topics given close attention include the Spanish conquest of the Mexica/Aztec Empire, Native American responses to the invasion of their homelands, religion as a key site of conflict and accommodation among varied cultural groups, the slave trade and the rise of modern plantation slavery, environmental exchanges across the Atlantic, the Age of Democratic Revolutions with an emphasis on Haiti, and the dismantling of slavery in the western hemisphere by 1888.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Social Context and Institutions.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 241 - History of Globalization, 1900-Present


    An introductory history of globalization. Explores the major political, economic, cultural and technological features of the twentieth century that have helped to create today’s global society. Emphasizes global changes and their effects on everyday life.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 251 - Technology and Society from Ancient Times till the Present


     A survey of the history of Western technology and, to a lesser extent, non-Western technology from ancient times till the present. The course covers major developments both ‘internally” – as tools and machines” – and “externally” as related to the societies which have produced them and upon they in turn have had impact. Thus HTY 251 is not an old-fashioned and one-sided “nuts and bolts” course. Instead HTY 251 examines the complex relationship between (1) technological change and (2) social, cultural, economic, and political change as each has affected the other over. Old-fashioned “nuts and bolts” history of technology courses invariably assume that virtually all technological developments constitute “progress” and often make technological “progress” the measure of all things. By contrast, HTY 251 repeatedly asks if that traditional simplistic equation between technological advances and social, cultural, economic, and political advances is accurate or if it might be rethought in various instances over the course of history.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition Social Context and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 261 - New England and Eastern Canada Since 1815: A Transnational Region


     

    This course examines the historical development of the geographical areas now referred to as New England and Eastern Canada from 1815, the end of the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812, the last major Anglo-American conflict, to the present. An emphasis will be placed on exploring New England and Eastern Canada as a transnational region in the making, where there have been more historical similarities than differences in spite of the gradual hardening of borders between countries, states, and provinces. The course will follow a rough chronology, and cover topics such as building borders, political institutions, and identities, economic pursuits like agriculture, forestry, and fishing, sporting cultures, women’s suffrage, civil rights, environmental movements, and indigenous resurgences.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment and Social Context and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Alternating

    Credits: 3

  
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    HTY 265 - The Power of Maps


    Humans have been making maps for thousands of years, but never before were maps as present in everyday life as they are today.  Just think of the GPS in cars and the locator apps on our phones. It is more important than ever that we understand maps, how they are made, and how they have shaped society, from guiding imperial expansion to influencing urban development, land use, tourism, and surveillance.  This course teaches students the history of maps and map-making from the first rock carvings of ancient cities to Google Earth and smart bombs. Major topics will include how maps have been essential tools for government, warfare, territorial control, social and economic planning, and artistic expression. We will explore how map-making technology has changed over time, the drive for increasing accuracy, and how the design of maps reflects the cultures that produce them.  Students will also learn how to make their own maps to tell a spatial historical narrative.  Most broadly, this course will teach students how to read maps as rich documents that are fascinating windows on the past.  If this course was taken under as a topics course in HTY 398, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Artistic and Creative Expressions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 275 - Geography of Globalization


    Examines changing demographic, economic, political, and cultural connections across the globe over the past 500 years; their representation through maps; and our current awareness of the globe and the Earth’s environment. (GEO 275 and HTY 275 are identical courses.)

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 278 - American Military History


    America’s experience with warfare, from the colonial period through the Vietnam era. How American wars have been fought, and the complex interrelationship between American society and the military, including economic, political and social factors.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 279 - European Military History


    A survey from the 18th Century to the present. Examines the causes and nature of war, the relationship of soldiers and civilians, and war’s impact on modern society.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 311 - Research Seminar


    A writing intensive seminar that introduces students to the historiography and methodology of important themes in history. Its topics vary. This is a required seminar for all History majors as preparation for the Senior Seminar. Utilizing secondary and selected primary sources students will consider how historians construct different interpretative narratives of past events.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring
     

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 312 - Furs, Frontiers, and Fame: North American Exploration


    This course examines the identities, practices, and spaces of exploration in North America from the late fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. Different political, economic, scientific, and cultural motives for the exploration of Canada and the United States over time will be compared and contrasted. The experiences of Spanish, French, English, Russian, American, and Canadian explorers and expeditions will be situated in local, national, imperial, and global contexts. The course will broadly explore the themes of cross-cultural encounter, exploration and science, textual and visual representation, and the public commemoration of explorers and exploration.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives.

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 330 - Robber Barons, Reformers and Radicals 1877-1914


    Traces the transformation of the United States into a modern nation by exploring themes of industrialization, urbanization, immigration, politics, and imperial outreach. Particularly focuses on the contest of power between so-called “Robber Barons”, or industrial leaders, and the reformers and radicals who challenged their vision for the nation.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 332 - Womanhood in America


    Examines the changing experiences of American women from colonial times to the present. Emphasis on what women did and what they were told to do, the experiences of different groups of women, and the ways in which women worked to change their situation.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 338 - Everyday Life in America, 1600-1850


    Examines the experience of everyday life for ordinary Americans living during the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. In order to explore this everyday world, the class will analyze a wide variety of sources including architecture, clothing, decorative arts, folktales, diaries and family history.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
 

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