Sep 27, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Earth Sciences

  
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    ERS 103 - Dynamic Earth


    Explores how Earth’s dynamic processes interact with humans by evaluating: the interplay between Earth’s interior, hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere; the effects and underlying causes of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tidal waves and global warming; Earth’s economic and energy resources how they form and how long they will last; and the global environment and how best to interact with it. Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements:  Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 108 - Beaches and Coasts


    An introduction to coastal landforms, including beaches, salt marshes, tidal flats and sea cliffs, their origins, global distribution, and associated nearshore processes. Human impacts to the coastal zone, including coastal erosion, land loss and management, and human responses to sea-level change are considered. Course may have field trips during class time and a one day field trip. (This course is identical to SMS 108.)

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 121 - Humans and Global Change


    Explores how Earth’s climate system works and how past environmental changes affected humans on time scales ranging from interannual to hundreds of thousands of years. Topics will range from the development of agriculture at the beginning of the current interglaciation to how humans are now changing global climate through the addition of greenhouses gases to the atmosphere.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 152 - Earth’s Changing Climate


    Earth harbors a climate that is unique in the solar system, with its ability to sustain liquid water and support life.  The geologic record bears witness to spectacular climate changes in the past, the most recent of which heralded the emergence of a complex, globally interconnected human society.  Today humans are influencing the climate system in potentially unprecedented ways.  The purpose of this course is to understand and evaluate the scientific basis of Earth’s climate and past, present, and future change within the climate system, and to provide scientific context for a warming world.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy and Application of Scientific Knowledge

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 191 - Energy in the Earth System


    Energy in the Earth System - Explores the Earth Science concepts that underlie energy, energy sources, energy distribution and flow, and the role of energy in climate. We will consider the ways in which society interacts with and extracts energy from the Earth System, the energy balance of Earth and the climate implications of energy use, and gain an understanding of renewable and non-renewable energy sources.

     

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Quantitative Literacy

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 3

  
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    ERS 200 - Earth Systems


    A survey of dynamic topics in earth sciences, emphasizing active participation in on-going faculty research in topics such as: global climate change, changing sea levels, geochemical cycles, plate tectonics and mountain building, and the geological evolution of the northern Appalachians.  Multiple field trips; at least one a weekend. Lec 3, Lab 3.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: Any 100-level UMaine Earth Sciences course.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 201 - Global Environmental Change


    Examines the physical and chemical interactions among the primary systems operating at the Earth’s surface (atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere) on various timescales throughout geologic history.  We will consider internal and external forces that have shaped environmental evolution, including the role of humans in recent geochemical and climatic change.  During lecture and laboratory sessions, our goals are to develop critical thinking skills and a scientific approach to the complex array of feedbacks operating at the Earth’s surface, as well as an appreciation for how past environmental change informs current societal issues.  Course will include field trips during class hours and may include weekends.

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences and Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: Any 100-level ERS course.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 240 - The Atmosphere


    The nature of planetary atmospheres, physical processes in the atmosphere, clouds and precipitation, global climate, seasons, natural and anthropogenic climate change, forecasting of storms. Lec 3, Lab 2.

    General Education Requirements:  Laboratory in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 301 - Earth and Climate Science Geomatics


    This course will provide an introduction to the collection, display, manipulation and management of geospatial information. The focus will be on modern tools, techniques and methodologies commonly used by earth and environmental scientists. The course will be divided into surveying and mapping (including GPS), satellite remote sensing, and geographical information systems (GIS). Lec. 2.5 hr, Lab 3hr.

    Prerequisites: Any ERS 100 level course or SMS 108 or permission of instructors.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall 

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 312 - Geochemistry


    Introduction to the field of geochemistry, from Earth formation to modern processes in the deep Earth and at the surface.  This course will investigate the chemistry of many Earth materials, including rocks, soils, surface and ground waters, and oceans. Course may include weekend field trips. 

    Lec 3, Lab 3

    Prerequisites: CHY 121 & 123, and any 100 level ERS course.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 4

  
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    ERS 315 - Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy


    Basic concepts and techniques of stratigraphy and sedimentation. Field trips to local environments and outcrops. Laboratories emphasize practical analytical techniques of sedimentology, petrography of sedimentary rocks in hand specimens and thin section, and modern stratigraphic approaches. Lec 3, Lab 3. 

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Any 100 level ERS course.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring Even Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 316 - Structural Geology


    Explores the principles of structural geology, with emphasis on the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of Earth deformation. Includes several field trips with the aim of integrating field observations and theory. Lec 2, Lab 3. Course may have field trips during class times with the aim of integrating field observations and theory.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ERS 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall,  Odd Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 317 - Introduction to Geophysics


    Introduction to geophysical studies and global geodynamics.  Seismological, gravity, magnetic, electrical and geothermal studies of the Earth’s lithosphere and cryosphere are emphasized in integrated class, field and laboratory exercises.  Course problem solving requires spread sheeting and numerical modeling applications using available personal computers.

    Prerequisites: MAT 126 & PHY 111 or 121 and any 100 level ERS course.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 319 - Geohazards and Humans


    Geohazards and Humans will introduce the scientific principles necessary to understand the underlying causes of the most devastating natural disasters on Earth.  Students will learn how to apply modern geological concepts and theories to identify drivers of major geological hazards and reduce their impacts.  It is designed for students who major in the geosciences but will also benefit students majoring in environmental science, engineering, public policy and business.  A primary goal is to translate a working knowledge of the science of natural hazards into strong critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to prepare students to work with geohazards in their future careers. To meet this goal, the course objectives are to demonstrate the use of geological methods and techniques to study geological hazards, and introduce tools that help to mitigate the impact of these events on humans.  Students will learn about established and emerging approaches for reducing the impact of volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, extra-terrestrial impacts, shifts in climate and anthropogenic pollutants on humans and the global economy.

    General Education Requirements: Science Applications and Population and Environment 

    Prerequisites: Any 100-level Earth Science course or by permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 320 - Research Seminar in Earth and Climate Sciences


    Research seminar course of students with junior or senior standing.  Students will attend research presentations by School of Earth and Climate Sciences faculty or graduate students and write short reviews of these presentations with the goals of increasing student understanding and awareness of the role of research in earth and climate sciences and strengthening students’ writing skills.

    Prerequisites: ERS 200 and ERS 201 and Junior or Senior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    ERS 321 - Problems in Earth and Climate Sciences


    Students conduct an original investigation and report findings. May not normally be used as a required geology elective. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-4
  
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    ERS 323 - Extreme Weather


    Extreme weather is analyzed in terms of its physical basis as well as historical, economic and human consequences.  Emphasis is placed on the interplay between technological advances, the evolution of meteorology as a science, and the impacts of extreme weather (winter storms, severe thunderstorms, tornados, tropical storms, El Nino, floods, droughts, heatwaves, cold waves).  Recommended: ERS 121 or ERS 240

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy and Population and Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 330 - Earth Materials


    Examination of fundamental aspects of the materials that record Earth history and the processes that shape the planet. Through a combination of lectures, laboratory sessions, and other active-learning exercises, we explore how minerals form, their structure and composition, and their physical and chemical properties.  Through discussions and presentations, we explore minerals in the context of the rocks in which they are found, with the aim of gaining a greater understanding of physical and chemical makeup of the Earth. Throughout the course, we relate mineralogy to geologic processes and other fields of Earth Science.  Course may include weekend field trips.

    Prerequisites: ERS 200 or ERS 201; CHY 121 and MAT 126 recommended.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 340 - Economic Geology


    This course examines the geological characteristics of metallic and industrial mineral deposits, the geological environments and processes responsible for their genesis, the methods used in their discovery and extraction, and the challenges of environmentally responsible reclamation of extraction sites.

    Prerequisites: ERS 330 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 350 - Fresh-Water Flow


    Focuses on characterizing fresh-water hydrologic systems (Lakes, Rivers, ground water, etc.) and the fluxes of water between these reservoirs.  Rates of precipitation, evaporation, channelized flow, overland flow, and infiltration are calculated and used to assess watershed hydrology. Course may include weekend field trips.

    Prerequisites:  MAT 122 or a passing score on UM Math Placement Exam #3.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 361 - The Principles of Geomorphology


    Focuses on the shapes, dimensions, and dynamics of landforms on Earth. The material covered will provide an introductory understanding of process mechanics and their relation to the genesis and alteration of landforms in varied settings and over a range of scales. Topics covered will include general background on the discipline of geomorphology, internal and climate forces associated with earth surface systems, chemical and physical weathering, drainage basins, fluvial systems, wind generated landforms, glacial processes, karst landscapes, and coastal environments. The course approach will provide attention to landform ontologies, measurement techniques, and analytical frameworks necessary to quantify earth surface measurement and observations. Two one-day weekend field trips may be scheduled during the semester.

    Prerequisites: ERS 200 and ERS 201

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 401 - Paleoceanography


    The ocean plays a central role in regulating climate and supporting life on our planet, and it has not always operated as it does today.  Throughout Earth history, the ocean has undergone dramatic changes in circulation, temperature, chemical composition, and more.  In this course, students will explore our ocean’s dynamic past, which provides insight into its present and future behavior.  We will discuss key research techniques, major discoveries, and emerging frontiers in the field of paleoceanography (the study of the global ocean’s circulation, chemistry, biology, and geology through geologic time). Students will read and discuss key research articles each week that complement lecture material.  They will also work with both modern and paleo datasets to enhance their skills and deepen their understanding of how scientists infer past ocean conditions from geologic archives.  ERS 401 and ERS 501 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: Any 100 level ERS course.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 420 - Computer Scripting for Data Analysis


    This course focuses on the application of a computer scripting language (Python or similar language) to interpret and analyze earth and environmental science data and processes. Students will learn to use an interpreted computer language to perform calculations, evaluate data sets, create complex graphs and simulate simple systems.

    Prerequisites: MAT 127.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 425 - How to Build a Habitable Planet


    This course will take a journey through the remarkable geologic and climatic events that led to the emergence of life, an oxygen-rich atmosphere, explosions and collapses of biodiversity, waxing and waning of continental ice sheets, and ultimately a planet on which Homo Sapiens could thrive and develop civilizations unlike anything Earth has ever witnessed. We will explore the great and as-yet unsolved mysteries of Earth’s evolution with an eye toward placing our existence into the context of what it takes to build, and sustain, a habitable world. We will consider internal and external forces that have shaped environmental evolution over the planet’s history, including the role of humans in geochemical and climatic change. We will consider the geochemical proxies and isotopic geochronometers that have improved our understanding of past environments and climates. Our goals are to develop critical thinking and writing skills and a scientific approach to the complex array of feedbacks that govern the evolution of Earth’s surface and climate, as well as an appreciation for how past Earth System change can inform current human and societal issues.

    ERS 425 and ERS 525 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: ERS 200 and ERS 201, or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
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    ERS 433 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology


    Using field relationships, rock textures, and chemical systems, we take a qualitative and quantitative system-based approach to exploring rock-forming processes within Earth’s crust and mantle.  In keeping with the fact that modern understanding of igneous and metamorphic processes requires use of microscopes and microanalysis, students will use petrographic and electron microscopes to make observation and gather data related to mineral chemistry and textures in preparation for later analysis.  This course also develops aspects of scientific methodology, including classification schemes and data collection, management, and analysis.  Several weekend field trips are required.

    Prerequisites: ERS 330.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 441 - Glaciers and Our Landscape


    Explores the nature of the ice ages, including the work of glaciers and how they shape the earth’s surface.  Emphasis is on understanding the processes that resulted in the landscape and sediments we see today. Course may have field trips during class times. (ERS 441 and 541 are identical courses and cannot both be taken for degree credit.)

    General Education Requirements:  Population and the Environment and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Any 100 level ERS course or Graduate Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 444 - Introduction to Glaciology


    Glaciers and ice sheets cover a significant portion of the planet and have major impacts  on surrounding Earth systems and human communities. Glaciers act as a consistent source of freshwater, they sculpt the Earth’s near surface geology, and they can influence tectonics, weather, climate, ocean and surrounding ecosystems.  This course will study the life cycle of glaciers and ice sheets, the physics which influence their structure, size, movement, and their interaction with surrounding environments.  This course will also explore tools and methods used to study glaciers and ice sheets through practical exercises and experiments.  Methods we will explore include classic field glaciological techniques, geochemistry, geophysics, remote sensing, and numerical modeling.  Note: ERS 444 and ERS 544 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: ERS 200 or ERS 201 and MAT 116 or MAT 126 or permission of the instructor

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 451 - Tectonics


    Exploration of the plate tectonic mechanisms that control and modify the first-order features of Earth’s surface.  We consider how the movements of the uppermost 100-200 km of our planet creates the topographic features and patterns in the continents and oceans.  One weekend field trip.

    Prerequisites: Any 200-level ERS course or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 460 - Marine Geology


    Topics include theories of the origin of the earth as a planet and the development of continents and ocean basins, morphology and structure of the sea floor, interpretation of geological and geophysical evidence relevant to the origin and evolution of major tectonic features of oceans. Students may not receive credit for both ERS 460 and ERS 560.

    Prerequisites: Any 100 level ERS course.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even

    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ERS 480 - Introduction to Hydrogeology


    The role of groundwater in geologic and water supply processes including: the hydrologic cycle, groundwater interaction with surface water, groundwater flow and transport equations, aquifer characterization, chemistry of groundwater, and groundwater as a geologic agent.  ERS 480 and ERS 580 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: Any 100 level ERS course and MAT 126.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 498 - Undergraduate Thesis


    Original research in geological sciences. The research problem must be identified prior to the start of the senior year and may be of an experimental, empirical or theoretical approach. A committee of three or more faculty will supervise the thesis and its defense.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall,  Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ERS 499 - Field Experience in Earth and Climate Sciences


    Students will attend a four- to six-week earth or climate science field camp or engage in equivalent field-based research activities.  The experience (a) draws together the various threads of the School’s undergraduate program, (b) typifies the work of professionals within Earth and Climate Sciences, (c) develops problem-solving skills while working within a natural system, and (d) develops spatial cognition and reasoning.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone

    Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring and Summer

    Credits: 4-6

Ecology and Environmental Sciences

  
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    EES 100 - Human Population and the Global Environment


    Introduces the concepts and principles necessary to evaluate contemporary global issues of population growth, natural resource conservation and environmental protection. Surveys the historical development of environmental awareness in the United States. Develops skills to interpret critically the diverse types of information available about environmental issues.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    EES 117 - Introduction to Ecology and Environmental Sciences


    This course offers an introduction to college and provides an interdisciplinary perspective on ecological and environmental issues.  The course will examine ecological systems, the interrelationships between human activities and the environment, and the social, political, economic, and technological factors that affect the use of natural resources.  Material is presented via lectures, field trips during class hours and special readings.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    EES 140 - Soil Science


    Considers the chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, as well as the origin, management and interrelationships of soils to plant growth.  Rec 3.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge requirement when taken without EES 141.  Together with EES 141, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences requirement.

    Prerequisites: BMB 207 or CHY 121 is recommended.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    EES 141 - Soil Science Laboratory


    A series of practical laboratory exercises providing hands-on experience with soil measurements and information use. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements: Together with EES 140, this course Satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Prerequisites: BMB 207 or CHY 121 is recommended.

    Corequisites: EES 140

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    EES 217 - Field Research Experience in Ecology and Environmental Sciences


    This course is an intensive field experience for EES majors. EES undergraduates will stay at a remote site (e.g., Schoodic Education and Research Center at Acadia National Park) for an intensive multi-day program  that will immerse them in the rich science and cultural history that makes Maine a living laboratory for environmental issues.   Students will be challenged to identify and assess emerging issues in environmental science and natural resources management.  Students will be introduced to relevant problems or issues facing stakeholders in the field of ecology and environmental sciences, and will work in teams to research, synthesize, and present what they’ve learned. The field setting is rich with opportunities for outdoor experience, interactions with scientists in residence, and varied local, regional, and national stakeholders with whom they will collaborate.  This course is a required field experience for EES majors.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 0-2
  
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    EES 312 - Energy, Law & Environment: Contending with Climate Change


    This course addresses the major ethical and legal questions pertaining to energy production and utilization, including environmental and social impacts, with an emphasis on development of climate change policy.   Through a combination of lectures, role play, case studies, and discussions, students will consider these issues in local, national, and international contexts.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    EES 324 - Environmental Protection Law and Policy


    A survey of the law and policy of environmental protection in the United States with emphasis on Federal statutes and common law approaches to environmental protection. Material covered will include the basic statutes, the administrative law, the case law of air quality, water quality, hazardous substances and the National Environmental Policy Act. Students will develop an understanding of how the legal process works in the context of specific environmental case studies and will be encouraged through class dialogues and exercises to develop their analytic skills.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    EES 351 - Energy, Wealth, and Power: a Biophysical Systems view of Nature and Society


    Within the biophysical economics paradigm, energy is the unseen arbiter that drives ecological and economic processes. Biophysical systems of nature and human society are organized according to seemingly universal laws that govern the concentration, conversion, and degradation of energy over space and time. These laws explain historic patterns in ecological and societal evolution and provide a framework for responding to planetary crises of climate change, peak energy, and unpayable ecological debt. Students will apply biophysical systems principles of energy return on investment (EROI), energy hierarchy, transformity, embodied energy (eMergy), and maximum eMpower to better understand the past and better prepare for the future in a rapidly-degrading ecosphere. Students will read historic and current literature, participate in (and sometimes lead) interactive class discussions, and complete individual- or group-projects.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructors permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    EES 390 - Junior Seminar


    Exposes students to emerging issues in Ecology and Environmental Sciences through weekly attendance of existing seminars across a variety of academic units at UMaine.  Focuses on the meaning of interdisciplinary work and how discipline-diverse approaches aid in solving complex environmental problems.  Develops skills for career development, such as professional and public presentations, job search skills, and career planning.  Provides experiences with a variety of academic cultures and professionals.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing in Ecology and Environmental Sciences

    Credits: 3
  
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    EES 396 - Field Experience in Ecology and Environmental Sciences


    Approved work experience for which academic credits is given. Students may work part time or full time for a semester in an approved program of work experience which contributes to the academic major. Students have the opportunity to gain practical experience in a job related to their professional career goals.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 1 - 16

  
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    EES 397 - Topics in Ecology and Environmental Sciences Conservation and Management


    The conservation and management of natural resources entail dynamic social, economic, and scientific problems. Students investigate a natural resource topic of current national or international concern. Topics vary; course may be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Ecology and Environmental Sciences major or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    EES 475 - Field Studies in Ecology


    An intensive ecology travel study course of one to several weeks to an area of ecological interest (e.g., the Amazon basin or Serengeti plains) scheduled during winter or spring break, May term, or summer.  Field and living conditions may be rigorous and/or primitive and include overnight and weekend travel.  There is a fee associated with this course for travel expenses.  The course MAY meet weekly prior to and following the travel component. Course may be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:  BIO 319 or WLE 200 or SMS 300 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    EES 489 - Critical Issues in Ecology and Environmental Sciences


    Current and historically important issues in natural resource management and conservation are evaluated by teams of students and faculty.  Interdisciplinary approaches to problem analysis are stressed, with special attention to the ways scientific information and management options affect policy. Students use quantitative tools, undertake critical reading and synthetic writing, and further develop science literacy skills.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Ecology and Environmental Sciences major or minor with senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    EES 497 - Independent Studies in Ecology and Environmental Sciences


    Analysis and investigation of current problems in ecology and environmental sciences in consultation with a faculty member in the program. May be repeated for additional credit.

    Prerequisites: Ecology and Environmental Sciences major.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-4

Economics

  
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    ECO 117 - Issues and Opportunities in Economics


    Consists of weekly meetings of first year students.  Topics covered include overview of the fields of Economics, school and university program requirements, and current economic issues.  Pass/Fail grade only.

    Prerequisites: Economics/Financial Economics Major

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    ECO 120 - Principles of Microeconomics


    Principles of microeconomics and their application to economic issues and problems. Analysis of the economic decision-making of individuals and firms; markets and pricing; monopoly power; income distribution; the role of government intervention in markets.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ECO 121 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    Principles of macroeconomics and their application to modern economic issues and problems. Analysis of national income and employment; fluctuations in national income; monetary and fiscal policy; control of inflation, unemployment, and growth; and international aspects of macroeconomic performance.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ECO 180 - Citizens, Energy & Sustainability


    This course is intended to provide students with a broad understanding of energy issues by focusing upon current energy use and mandates, energy production (with a focus on alternative energy options), as well as introduces the political, human and environmental implications of energy use and production.  We will discuss how citizens play a vital role in determining the direction that energy policy will take.  In the course of our lifetime each of us will be asked to vote on an energy related circumstance, this course intends to give you a place to start in understanding the complexities of energy.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ECO 190 - World Food Supply, Population and the Environment


    Reviews current global resources focusing primarily upon food production and population, and environmental problems relating to food production and distribution. World trade and world trade policy are considered with primary emphasis on food. Other topics include world trade liberalization, genetically modified foods and comparative agricultural systems.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ECO 205 - Freakonomics


    The primary lesson of economics is that incentives matter: economic agents alter their behavior in predictable ways when faced with changing costs and benefits. Over the past 30 years, the power of economics as a predictive social science has been demonstrated time and time again as scholars have shown that seemingly uneconomic decisions can be modeled from an economic perspective. In this course, we will use academic readings and popular books such as Freakonomics to indicate the breadth and scope of questions that can be analyzed from an economic perspective.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Context & Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ECO 217 - Issues and Opportunities in Economics II


    Consists of weekly meetings of second year economics students.  Topics covered include a review of major career tracks for economics majors, internship opportunities, study abroad options, and an introduction to professional development. Pass/Fail grade only.

    Prerequisites: Economics/Financial Economics Major

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    ECO 240 - Maine Economy


    An in-depth analysis of the Maine economy, including its history, socio-economic trends, influential institutions, economic performance, aging demographics and the labor force, environmental impact, food security, international trade, and the distribution of income.  Maine’s economic strengths and opportunities along with its weaknesses and threats will also be explored.  Lastly, a comprehensive review of past and current State level economic growth and development strategies will be presented and analyzed for their achievements and shortcomings.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 or ECO 121 or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ECO 254 - Small Business Economics and Management


    Application of economic concepts to real world business and economic decisions using graphs, spreadsheets and analytical techniques.  Students will learn introductory small business management concepts, how to estimate the cost of producing goods and services, and how to develop business feasibility studies.  Students will develop a hands-on project that integrates Excel to create a purposeful model.

    General Education Requirements: Social Context and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer, Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ECO 266 - Principles of Economic Data Analysis


    Covers a variety of empirical methods that are often used to examine economic data.  Emphasis is on using the appropriate data analysis tool to solve a problem or answer an economics-related question.  Focuses on statistical inference, as well as descriptive and regression-based analysis.  Includes several computer-based assignments.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in ECO 120, ECO 121, and either STS 215 or STS 232. or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ECO 280 - Fundamentals of Mathematical Economics


    This course applies the tools of scalar and linear algebra, univariate and multivariate calculus to economics and business decisions and problems.  Instruction includes applied equation solving, differentiation, integration, and optimization.  Applications include:  general economic modeling concepts including structural and reduced forms and equilibria, supply and demand modeling, utility maximization, cost minimization, profit maximization, and related applied topics.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 120, ECO 121, and either MAT 111 or MAT 115 - or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 285 - Economics of Sports


    Economic and business related issues facing sports franchises and leagues are examined using concepts from industrial organization, labor economics and public finance.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 120

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 290 - Introduction to Growth and Development


    Development Economics examines one of the most important economic, political, and moral challenges of our time.  Namely, the demand for economic growth and development in low-income countries, and the prospects for their transformation into modern, globalized, and high-income economies.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 or ECO 121 or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 321 - Intermediate Macroeconomics


    Analysis of the basic forces that cause fluctuations in economic activity and their effects on employment, investment, and business firms.  Stabilization proposals examined and evaluated.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in ECO 120 and ECO 121, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 339 - International Finance


    Analysis of the fundamental characteristics of an open macroeconomy including exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustment, income determination, financial flows, effect of monetary and fiscal policies on exchange rates, economic integration and global monetary issues.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 and ECO 121.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 340 - The Canadian Economy: Issues and Policies


    Survey of the structure and functioning of the Canadian economic system, its problems and the policies used to solve them.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 and ECO 121 or equivalent with permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 350 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory


    A study of how individual choice allocates goods and resources in market economies.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 120 or Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 353 - Money and Banking


    Examines the American banking and financial system including monetary theory and policy.

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 and ECO 121 or equivalent with permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 363 - Game Theory


    This course provides an introduction to game theory and its application in economics. Students will study a series of games that capture various aspects of strategic interaction - including well-known games such as Prisoner’s Dilemmas, Arms Races, Auctions, and Voting Mechanisms. Each game will be motivated by a common problem faced by decision-makers in the real world. Students will play versions of each game for themselves and analyze outcomes from similar games in the real world. Students will then use the tools of economics and game theory to study how behavior is influenced by the nature of the game itself, such as available information, beliefs about other players, and the interrelatedness of outcomes.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in the following: ECO 120 and MAT 115 or MAT 116 or MAT 122 or MAT 126

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 370 - Topics in Economics


    Includes readings, research and discussions. Topics vary depending on faculty and student interests.

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 and ECO 121 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ECO 371 - Public Finance and Fiscal Policy


    This course examines the effects of government spending and taxation. The course explores the various ways that markets fall to achieve socially optimal outcomes, which justifies government provision of some products such as education, pension (i.e., Social Security), medical insurance (Medicaid and Medicare), public assistance, and so forth. The course also studies the effects of various taxes needed to finance these and other types of government spending.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: A grade of  C-  or better in ECO 120 and ECO 121

    Course Typically Offered: Alternating Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 377 - Environmental Economics and Policy


    This course takes an economics-based approach to the study of environmental issues, including how economists’ value environmental resources and address market failures Contemporary environmental economics problems and policies are presented.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: C- in either ECO 120 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 381 - SL: Sustainability Science, Policy, and Action


    Sustainability concerns not just environmental balance but also social, economic, cultural and ethical factors - that is, nearly everything. Sustainability science is the research field that attempts not only to study this unwieldy group of subjects, but also to motivate positive change toward more sustainable societies. This course explores the scientific foundation of the global environmental sustainability crisis, the economic, social and ethical ramifications of that crisis, and surveys the prospects and challenges in the quest to define, measure and achieve sustainable societies. We also step beyond the academic classroom to accomplish sustainability research and service in the larger community with a semester-long integrated service learning project. This course has been designated as a UMaine service-learning course.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment and Ethics

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 385 - Econometrics


    Introduction to the models and methods used to estimate relationships and test hypotheses pertaining to economic variables.  Among the topics covered in the course are: Single and multiple regression analysis; functional forms; omitted-variable analysis; multicollinearity; heteroskedasticity; and simultaneous equations models.  Practical application of regression techniques, including the use of coding and statistical software, occupies second half of the course.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: C- or better in  MAT 116 or MAT 126 or equivalent, ECO 266 and one of the following: ECO 321 or ECO 350, or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 390 - Chinese Economy


    Analysis of the recent transformation of the Chinese economy and its impact on the labor force, economic performance, environment, distribution of wealth, and global trading patterns of China.  Both micro and macro economic theory will be utilized to investigate the transformation process.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 and ECO 121 or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 395 - Field Experience


    Upon obtaining an internship, students may seek approval for their economics-related work experience to count for credit towards their degree. Students must obtain approval from the department prior to being enrolled. Up to 12 total ECO 395 credits are allowed to count towards any School of Economics degree. 

    Prerequisites: Permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6
  
  •  

    ECO 404 - Behavioral and Experimental Economics


    Experimental research continues to demonstrate that the economic decisions of individuals and groups deviate, sometimes dramatically, from those predicated by standard economic theory’s rational actor model.  Behavioral economics seeks to explain the economic decision-making of consumers and citizens, as psychologically complex, cognitively limited, emotional, social decision-makers.  This course explores the foundations of behavioral economics and develops skills in designing and conducting economic experiments for the development of new behavioral insights.  Topics include bounded rationality, prospect theory, reference dependence, social preferences, anchoring, framing, and priming, moral balancing, and applications of behavioral economics to public policy.  The semester culminates in the creation of an experimental research proposal. 

    ECO 404 and 504 cannot both be taken for credit.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Context and Institutions. 

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    ECO 405 - SL: Sustainable Energy Economics & Policy


    This course examines tradeoffs associated with the technical, economic, environmental, and social implications of energy supply, distribution, and use in the context of transitioning toward a sustainable energy future.  Students examine a variety of renewable and non-renewable energy options for electricity, heating and transportation. Students assess quantitative and qualitative indicators of sustainability related to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, air and water quality, human health and safety, energy security, wildlife and the environment, technological efficiency and availability.  They examine the effect of policies (e.g., carbon prices, emissions targets, efficiency requirements, renewable portfolio standards, feed-in tariffs) on these indicators and tradeoffs.  The course provides brief introductions to environmental life cycle assessment (LCA), social benefit cost analysis (SBCA) and multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), as they apply to energy issues.  Students apply course concepts to a service-learning project in which they work with people from surrounding communities on local sustainable energy solutions.  Field trips may be required.  Students may not receive credit for both ECO 405 and ECO 505.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment and Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A grade of C-  or better in ECO 120 and a grade of C- or better in  MAT 116 or MAT 126

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 410 - Accelerated Introductory Economics


    An accelerated presentation of the fundamental elements of micro- and macroeconomic theory. Microeconomic topics include consumer and firm behavior, structure and functioning of purely competitive markets, and alternative market structures. Macroeconomic topics include financial system structure, measurement of aggregate economic activity and determinants of economic growth, economic fluctuations, and stabilization policies.


    Note: This course is for non-economics majors only. It cannot be taken for degree credit towards the completion of any School of Economics undergraduate degree program.  ECO cannot be taken for credit if a student has taken either ECO 120 or ECO 121.
     

    Prerequisites: Baccalaureate degree or Junior/Senior standing and minimum GPA of 3.25, or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    ECO 416 - Evolutionary Economics


    Evolutionary Economics is a rigorous exploration of the dynamics of human economies and their social underpinnings, giving students the ability to use economic logic far beyond its usual confines.  Students will learn how (and how not) to apply the Darwinian model of adaptive evolution (variation, selection and transmission) to market evolution, as well as human culture, behavior, and institutional change.  The course also integrates new literature on the evolution of cooperation and multilevel selection to provide a solid mechanistic model of the dynamics of institutions, economies and societies.  The course covers historical and current evolutionary approaches to economics and students will learn how an evolutionary approach connects to the other social sciences.  We study emergence of social and economics adaptations of individuals, governments, corporations and other organizations.  Students build evolutionary accounts of economic systems, characterize evolutionary forces acting in economic systems, suggest interventions to improve outcomes.  Students complete a major project on an evolving economic system of their choosing.  Students will be introduced to the analytical tools of evolutionary game theory and agent-based modeling.  

    ECO 416 and 516 cannot both be taken for credit

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: ECO 120 and ECO 121 and Sophomore standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate years

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    ECO 426 - Regional Economics: Policy and Practice


    This course is about U.S. regional economic development, with an emphasis on policy and practice (i.e., the types of strategies used by regions to promote economic development). Topics include business climate and taxes; industry clusters; human capital; the importance of small businesses; technology-based approaches to economic development; amenities; and aspects of new growth (e.g., residential development, people moving into a region).

    Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 120 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 427 - Regional Economics: Modeling


    Analysis and measurement of changes in state and local economies.  Emphasis on analytical tools, such as input-output modeling.  ECO 427 and 527 cannot both be taken for credit. 

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- in both ECO 120 and MAT 126, or permission

    Corequisites: ECO 366

    Course Typically Offered: Alternating Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 433 - Labor Economics


    This course examines various types of labor-market data; such as earnings, unemployment, and labor-force participation.  It explores theories of labor demand, labor supply, and human capital. This course examines some of the important factors that make labor markets unique; such as matching, implicit contracts, and bargaining power.  Theories explaining significant differences in earnings (e.g., hedonic wages and discrimination) are developed.  Income inequality and the effects of international trade are examined.  Throughout the course, the effects of important public policies (e.g., minimum wage laws, taxes, and various forms of social insurance) are explored.  Empirical evidence is also emphasized throughout the course.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in ECO 120, ECO 121 and ECO 350 or ECO 420

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Alternating Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 442 - Health Economics


    This course surveys major topics in health economics including: the economic determinants of health; the market for health care and insurance; the role of government. We focus on the health system in the United States with comparisons to other countries, as well as health system reform. We also consider special topics including: the health endowment; business cycles and health; socio-economic gradients in health; health externalities; health behaviors and outcomes.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 120 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 443 - Introduction to Modern Economic Growth


    An introduction to the empirical aspects of economic growth and an exploration of the major determinants of growth and decline, including the roles of technological progress and research and development, human capital accumulation, technology transfer, intellectual property rights and other sociopolitical institutions.  Both neoclassical and endogenous (new) growth theory ideas are considered.

    General Education Requirements: Social Context and Institutions

    Prerequisites: C- or better in either ECO 280 or ECO 420 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 450 - International Environmental Economics and Policy


    International environmental economics and policy uses an economic framework to examine the reasons behind, and methods to solve, conflicts between economic development and growth, trade, and the environment. It then explores the processes of international policy development: identifying problems, designing and negotiating solutions, and implementing policies to change national behavior.

    Prerequisites: MAT 115, and C- or better in either ECO 350 or ECO 420, or equivalent with permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 453 - Financial Economics


    Examines the economics of financial markets, asset pricing, risks, and decision making in the face of uncertainty.  Topics include the time value of money, the efficient market hypothesis, optimal portfolio allocation, and the capital asset pricing model.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in  ECO 120 and ECO 121, and in either MAT 116 or MAT 126, or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 462 - Economics of Education


    This course applies microeconomic theory, and econometrics to a lesser extent, to various issues on benefits, costs, and provision of education. More specifically, this course examines theories of education as investment in human capital and as investment in credentials, the various private and social benefits of education, the challenges of estimating causal effects of education, and a variety of important policy issues from pre-kindergarten through college. This course should be useful for both economics and education majors, and both undergraduate and graduate students.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 120 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 470 - Independent Capstone


    This course is for students interested in completing an independent capstone project. Students must work with a faculty advisor to complete a research paper on an economic topic of their choosing.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 321 and either ECO 350 or ECO 420, Senior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 475 - Industrial Organization


    Explores the relationship between market structure, conduct and performance. Development of a general analytical framework to assess performance in existing markets and evaluation of current public policy on this basis.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions, Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: C- or better in either ECO 350 or ECO 420.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 477 - Natural Resource Economics and Policy


    This course explores ways in which economic analysis can be used to inform and improve the management of natural resources. The goal of this course is to introduce students of the concepts of economics and how they relate to natural resource management. This course will cover topics, such as: How economists view the natural environment; Economic theory of resource exploitation (renewable and nonrenewable resources); The use of natural resources and their regulation; and The effect of economic activity on the natural environment (and vice versa).

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: C- or better in either ECO 350 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Every other spring 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 480 - Introduction to Mathematical Economics


    Mathematics used as a language in presenting concepts of economic theory.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 321, and C- or better in either ECO 350 or ECO 420, and C- or better in MAT 126 or ECO 280.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 488 - Spreadsheet Modeling and Decision Analysis


    An examination of quantitative techniques for optimization and forecasting typically used by businesses.  Emphasis is placed on modeling linear programming problems in Excel, determining optimal solutions, and interpreting parameter sensitivity.  The course also covers forecasting, queuing models, and simulation modeling.

    Prerequisites: ECO 120

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 489 - Senior Capstone


    A writing intensive and discussion based course focusing on current economic problems. Students are required to prepare a major research paper and presentation in conjunction with the instructor.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: Major in Economics (BA or BS), or Financial Economics; and Senior Standing and a grade of C- or better in ECO 321 and ECO 350 or ECO 420, or permission of the instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 496 - Field Experience in Economics


    Supervised employment in either the public or private sector. Requirements include initial proposal showing relevance of job and final report or paper.

    Prerequisites: 400-level economics course in relevant area of work.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ECO 497 - Independent Studies


    Student-driven independent research of an economic topic.  Students are required to have a faculty supervisor before being enrolled in this course.  May be repeated for additional credit.

    Prerequisites: Dept Consent

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

Education Human Development

  
  •  

    EHD 100 - New Student Seminar in Education and Human Development


    An introduction to university life and the requirements of programs in the College of Education and Human Development. Designed to help incoming students develop skills which enable them to be successful in college. Introduces academic, social resources, campus services and assist in career exploration. An important goal is to connect students with faculty, other students and the university community.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    EHD 101 - The Art and Science of Teaching


    Aligned to the revised Conceptual Framework and the InTASC and ISTE Standards for Teachers, the Art and Science of Teaching integrates content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and early field experience. Weekly meetings highlight topics and issues central to 21st century education while overarching themes weave throughout the course: reflective practice, diversity and inclusion, technology integration, differentiated instruction and evidence-based practice.  Substantial, periodic field experience supports student understanding of these topics and strands.  In this writing intensive course, students reflect on their experience and advocate for professional goals through written, oral, and technology-based composition.

    Course note:  Criminal History and Records Check (CHRC) required prior to enrollment. 

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive requirement

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent. Restricted to Elementary, Secondary, Kinesiology and Physical Education Teaching/Coaching, Child Development and Family Relations for Early Childhood Education majors only or Education minors only. Department consent and CHRC required.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    EHD 202 - Education in a Multicultural Society


    An interdisciplinary and multicultural examination of the school-society relationship in the United States. Participants examine their own and others’ assumptions about multiculturalism, globalization, and the political, economic, ecological, social, ethical and academic purposes that shape teaching and learning in the twenty-first century.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent. Restricted to Elementary, Secondary, Kinesiology and Physical Education Teaching/Coaching, Child Development and Family Relations for Early Childhood, Art and Music Education majors only or Education minors only.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EHD 203 - Educational Psychology


    A scientific study of human development, learning, cognition and teaching. Emphasis on theory and research and their application to educational problems.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EHD 204 - Teaching and Assessing for Student Learning


    Examines instructional planning, grouping of students, classroom space, appropriate teaching materials, the theory and ethical practice of educational assessment includes descriptive statistics, design, administration, scoring, and evaluation of assessments.  Emphasis will be given to teacher-made formative and summative assessments including standardized assessments and how to incorporate data into backwards planning for unit and lesson design.

    Prerequisites: Teacher Candidacy status or Child Development and Family Relations (ECE) or acceptance into Education minor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EHD 298 - Teacher Candidacy Field Experience


    Students will observe in educational settings social agencies or working with K-12 schools, complete field experience guidelines report and assist teachers and professionals. May be repeated for a total of three credits.

    Prerequisites: permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    EHD 301 - Classroom-based Prevention and Intervention: Supporting Positive Behavior and Academic Achievement


    This course examines the application of prevention and intervention theory and practice within classroom settings.  Theoretical perspectives on risk and resilience as they pertain to the development of competent social behaviors, including those found to facilitate social relationships, serve as academic enablers, and promote self-determination will be addressed.  Applied behavioral analysis, social learning theory, and the eco-behavioral framework will serve as the primary intellectual roots for this course.  Particular emphasis will be given to creating a comprehensive classroom plan based on evidence-based practices and implemented within a cohesive system of behavioral and academic support and intervention.  Contextual factors such as home, community, race, culture and SES, within the broader domain of social justice will provide the ecological backdrop of our study.

    Prerequisites: Teacher Candidacy status or Child Development and Family Relations (ECE) or acceptance into Education minor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EHD 400 - Field Observation (Activity)


    Study of education programs through visits, consultation and appraisal of practices in selected schools, instructional centers, clinics, laboratories and community agencies. Observations are considered in relation to research theory and practice.

    Prerequisites: Teacher Candidacy status for Elementary Education majors; EHD 204 and SED 302.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1-6
 

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