Oct 07, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Management

  
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    MGT 344 - Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation


    Develop an understanding of entrepreneurship theory and the relationship between entrepreneurial firms and the broader business environment.  Entrepreneurship focuses on new venture creation of high growth potential ventures through incremental or radical innovation.  This course is for students interested in entrepreneurship practice and those interested in pursuing entrepreneurial opportunities.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing, a grade of C- or better in ACC 201, and in MGT 325.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    MGT 396 - Field Experience/Internship


    Students may earn from one to six credit hours for a pre-planned, supervised field experience in business relevant to the student’s educational development and career goals. Credit will not be awarded for work experience acquired prior to registration for this course.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Business majors only with 2.50 grade point average or better; junior standing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6

  
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    MGT 445 - International Management


    Examines the management of the multinational corporation (MNC).Topics include motivations to internationalize, MNC types, strategy, structure and processes. Analysis of the competitive environment and alliances. Cross-cultural adjustment. Relies extensively on real-life business cases.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MGT 325 and MGT 343.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    MGT 449 - Strategic Management


    MGT 449 is the capstone course for the undergraduate business major.  It requires that the student draw together the knowledge gained in all core business coursework in the analysis of contemporary challenges facing business organizations.  Students are required to demonstrate their ability to interconnect these topics using strategic management skills and analytical tools.  Proficiency is shown via written and oral communications in individual and team based activities through in-depth analysis of increasingly complex business and not for profit organizational problems. This necessarily involves decision making and an understanding of ethical principles and approaches.
     

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Ethics and Capstone Experience Requirements. Must be taken in series with MGT 220 to meet Ethics requirement. Neither course alone fulfills the requirement. It is expected that students take this course in their last semester.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing Business Administration majors, A grade of C- or better in MGT 325 & FIN 350 & MKT 270.  Not open to Graduate Students and may not be taken for graduate credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    MGT 450 - Sport Management


    The course is industry practice centric providing an overview of all facets of sports management and the sports industry. The three main objectives are (i) to provide practical insights into the working of the sports industry, (ii) strategies required to manage sports organizations and (iii) career pathways and career strategies in sports. While we discuss youth, amateur, intercollegiate and professional sports, the main focus will be on professional sports.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites:  Sophmore Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    MGT 460 - Leadership


    Students will examine various perspectives of leadership theory and practice in business settings.  Topics include leadership and teambuilding, culture, communication, decision making, crisis, self-awareness, ethics, creating a vision, and styles of leadership.

    Prerequisites: Senior Status, at least a C in MGT 325

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    MGT 485 - Sport Management Practicum


    This course applies management, marketing, finance, and laws to a broadly-defined sport field.  Through hands-on learning, students are given the opportunity to study, analyze, and practice management in for-profit and non-profit sport and recreation organizations and relevant industries in the form of a semester-long team project.

    Prerequisites: MKT 455 and MGT 450

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    MGT 490 - Special Topics in Business Administration


    Study of various aspects of functional areas of accounting, finance, management, marketing, decision sciences, international business and other business-related topics. Topics vary depending on faculty and student interests. May be repeated for credit if the topics differ.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    MGT 498 - Independent Study for Undergraduate Study


    Provides an opportunity for well-qualified students to pursue a selected topic in great depth under the supervision of an individual faculty member. Topic to be determined in consultation with instructor.  May be repeated for credit as determined in consultation with instructor.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing, a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

Marine Science

  
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    SMS 100 - Introduction to Ocean Science


    A non-laboratory survey of the broad field of marine science, stresses the interconnections among aspects of oceanography, marine biology and ecology, living marine resources and human interactions with the marine environment. Practical applications of basic scientific principles are stressed.

    General Education Requirements:  Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 108 - Beaches and Coasts


    An introduction to coastal landforms, including beaches, salt marshes, tidal flats and sea cliffs, their origins, global distribution, and associated nearshore processes. Human impacts to the coastal zone, including coastal erosion, land loss and management, and human responses to sea-level change are considered. Course may have field trips during class times. Lec 3. (This course is identical to ERS 108.)

    General Education Requirements:  Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 110 - Concepts in Oceanography


    Basic concepts in physical, geological, chemical and biological oceanography will be discussed. Also includes an introduction to the relationship between the ocean and the atmosphere. Ends with a discussion of global change issues. Practical applications of basic scientific principles will be emphasized. May not be used for credit in the Marine Science major. (Offered at the Frederick Hutchinson Center, Belfast through the Continuing Education Division.) Course may have field trips during class times.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge requirement when taken without SMS 111.  Together with SMS 111, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences requirement.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 111 - Concepts in Oceanography Laboratory


    This course will support SMS 110: Concepts in Oceanography through laboratories on physical, chemical, and biological oceanography topics.  Labs will include studies of marine organism from the Gulf of Maine, computer-based labs using online data, and use of laboratory equipment to measure various parameters.  May not be used for credit in the Marine Science major. (Offered at the Fredrick Hutchinson Center, Belfast through the Continuing Education Division.) Course will include field trips during class hours and on weekends.

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences requirement when taken with SMS 110.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 1
  
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    SMS 201 - Biology of Marine Organisms


    An introduction to the diversity, form, and function of marine organisms, and to marine environments and ecological processes.  After a synopsis of the major groups of marine microorganisms, algae, plants, and animals, the course emphasizes the relationship between their structure (anatomy and morphology) and function (physiology), as well as their development and larval biology.  The course considers diverse marine habitats and ecosystems (rocky intertidal, estuaries and salt marshes, mudflats, coral reefs, open ocean, continental shelf and slope, deep sea), accentuating their physical factors (temperature, salinity and desiccation, solar radiation, oxygen, pressure) that affect their inhabitants. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 and SMS 100, both with a grade of C- or better, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 203 - Introduction to Integrative Marine Science


    Focusing on key topics in Marine Science research, students explore the nature of inquiry, elements of experimental design, data presentation, elementary statistics, and interpretation of scientific papers. Hands on activities introduce basic concepts in the biology of marine organisms, observational skills, data literacy and experimentation.

    Prerequisites:   Marine Science Majors only; Grade of C- or higher in SMS 100 and BIO 100 or permission.

    Corequisites: SMS 201, may be waived with permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    SMS 204 - Integrative Marine Science II: Physics and Chemistry of Marine Systems


    Integrates basic principles of physics and chemistry with an understanding of the marine environment and how marine organisms function in their environment. The lectures, with integrated laboratory exercises and computer simulations in physics and chemistry, are designed to stimulate critical thinking and provide students with specific skills relevant to studying marine habitats. The first half of the semester will focus on physics; topics include swimming strategies and physics of fluids; waves, and propagation of sound and light in the ocean. The second half of the semester will focus on water quality in coastal marine ecosystems; topics include the role of water quality in marine ecosystems and measurement of marine water quality. Data collection, analysis, and presentation skills are emphasized. Lec 2.

    Prerequisites: MAT 122 and SMS 203 and PHY 111 (or PHY 121) and CHY 121/123, all with a grade of C- or better, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    SMS 211 - Introduction to Aquaculture


    Principles and practices of aquaculture from international, national and local perspectives. Includes field trip.  (Students may not take both SMS 211 and AVS 211 for credit).

    General Education Requirements:  Applications of Scientific Knowledge

    Prerequisites: BIO 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 230 - Introduction to Marine Policy and Fisheries Management


    This course focuses on the human dimensions of ocean conservation and management, with emphasis on marine fisheries management in the United States.  Students will be introduced to a variety of tools and policy approaches for managing complex marine ecosystems.  Discussion and readings will highlight current and historical challenges facing oceans management, as well as the role of scientists and other stakeholders in marine conservation.  Potential issues addressed include ecosystem-based management, fishing communities, collective action dilemmas, bycatch and gear technology, marine protected areas and habitat, marine mammal and protected species conservation, aquaculture policy, and global climate change.

    General Education Requirements:  Population and Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 300 - Marine Ecology


    An introduction to fundamental ecological principles in the context of marine communities.  Uses examples from marine ecosystems to illustrate general principles of general ecology such as predation, competition, and nutrient cycling.  Focuses on the ecology of major marine ecosystems such as estuaries, sea shores and benthic communities and on aspects of applied ecology such as fisheries management.  Includes two days of field work at the Darling Marine Center. Course may have field trips during class times.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 302 - Oceanography


    An overview of geological, chemical, physical and biological oceanography and the way they interact. Topics include plate tectonics and evolution of ocean basins, physical and chemical characteristics of sea water, atmosphere-ocean coupling, two- and three-dimensional ocean circulation, waves and tides, sedimentation, planktonic organisms, productivity, pelagic ecosystems, biological-physical coupling, and biogeochemical cycles.  Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: CHY 122 and MAT 126 and PHY 112 or PHY 122 and SMS 100 all with a grade of C- or better, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 303 - Integrative Marine Science III: Oceanography


    Integrates the principles and methodologies behind planning and executing field and laboratory procedures to collect scientific measurements with approaches to data analysis, interpretation and scientific presentation. It does this specifically within the context of oceanography. A mixture of integrated laboratory exercises, field trips and computer simulations designed to illustrate the end-to-end process of proposing, planning, carrying out, analyzing, interpreting and reporting on (written and oral) scientific measurements. Meets for 4 hours per week and may have field trips during class times.

    Prerequisites: CHY 122 and MAT 126 and PHY 112 or PHY 122 and SMS 203 and SMS 204, all with a grade of C- or better, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    SMS 304 - Integrative Marine Science IV: Comparative Physiology, Cellular and Molecular Biology


    Integrates the principles and methodologies of physiology, cell and molecular biology and population genetics using marine models. Includes lectures, integrated laboratory exercises and gene analysis. Designed to illustrate the application of physiology, cellular and molecular biological techniques to the study of marine systems. Students will participate in hands-on laboratory exercises and data analysis, interpretation and reporting (written and oral).

    Prerequisites: BMB 280 and SMS 303 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    SMS 308 - Conservation and Ecology of Marine Mammals


    Examination of variations in ecological strategies in marine mammals and investigation of marine mammal conservation and health issues. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 309 - Techniques in Shellfish Aquaculture


    Residential course taught at the University’s Darling Marine Center. Explores the theory and practice of marine bivalve culture as conducted in the Northeastern U.S. Includes lectures, considerable “hands-on” experience, and field trips to commercial hatcheries and farms.

    Prerequisites: General knowledge in biology or relevant work experience.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 2
  
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    SMS 321 - Introduction to Fisheries Science


    Introduction to the assessment, management, conservation and exploitation of fisheries resources of commercial and recreational importance. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 or SMS 100 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 322 - Biology of Marine Vertebrates


    This course covers the taxonomy, phylogeny and diversity of marine fishes, reptiles, birds and mammals.  The course will discuss comparative functional morphology, physiology, sensory systems, ecology, behavior and life history strategies in relation to characteristics of the diverse marine habitats occupied by vertebrate animals.  Students will also learn about distributions, population trends and impacts of human exploitation. Course will include field trips during class hours and on weekends.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201, with a grad of C- or better, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 324 - Introduction to Research Diving


    This course provides an introduction to research diving and satisfies the 100 hours of required training for scientific divers as prescribed by the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS).  This training is required to participate in scientific diving activities at many universities, including UMaine, and at all AAUS member organizations throughout the United States.  Students will be instructed in advanced diving skills, dive rescue, oxygen administration, and research diving techniques.  Practical field diving activities will be a large focus of the course.  Following successful completion of course objectives, students will be eligible to participate in diving research projects as a scientific diver-in-training or scientific diver.  Students may also be eligible to apply for applicable recreational diving certifications.  Participation is not a guarantee for certification.  The course is taught by the UMaine Diving Safety Officer (DSO), selected UMaine faculty, and guest lecturers experienced in using scuba diving as a research tool.  Field trips during class time are required.  Transportation to Orono to pool sessions will be provided.

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 327 - Marine Pollution Policy


    This course covers current legislative, regulatory, market and community-based approaches to addressing problems of coastal and marine pollution, engaging with both discussions of strategies for pollution prevention and pollution cleanup.  The course will also include what roles scientific data play in defining and solving marine pollution problems and what strategies can be successful to motivate behavior changes to help solve such problems.  The course will work through a series of case studies focused on different pollution problems, comparing the policy-design and overall effectiveness of each and focusing on reasons why policies fail to achieve their desired outcomes.  The course concludes with a broader discussion of what approaches to governance promote social and ecological resilience in the face of global change.  Over the course of the semester, we will discuss:  runoff nutrient pollution, plastics and ocean trash, toxic contaminants; harmful algal blooms, ocean acidification and hypoxia, dumping of waste at sea, fishing industry pollution, marine debris, climate change as a pollution problem. This course has two optional, weekend field trips.

    Prerequisites: SMS 230

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 350 - Undergraduate Seminar


    Literature review of topics selected from the current marine literature leading to the preparation and presentation of written and oral papers. Emphasis on synthesizing information from other courses offered as part of the marine science degree to provide an overall appreciation of the field of marine sciences. Course may have field trips during class times.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    SMS 352 - Semester-by-the-Sea: Marine Ecology


    Marine communities and ecological interactions are studied through lectures, field trips along the rocky shore of Maine and laboratories.  Concepts of biodiversity, the food web and the role of physical and biological limiting factors are developed.  Critical and creative thinking and problem solving are enhanced by designing and conducting experiments to test hypotheses.  Data analysis and scientific report writing are emphasized. Students revise subsequent reports based on extensive critiques from the instructor(s).  Instructor critique each week covers elements of composition style and conventions used in scientific writing.  (Taught at the Darling Marine Center.) Course may have field trips during class times.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    SMS 354 - The Arctic Ocean: A Question-based Approach to Learning Marine Sciences


    The purpose of the course is to challenge students to apply their knowledge of the marine science to answer questions about the ocean.  The course is organized around the Arctic Ocean (AO).  Students will work together to examine diverse issues concerning the rapid changes that occur in this environment at multiple spatial, temporal and organizational scales, and the global implications of these changes.  Students will be encouraged to apply information from their introductory coursework and readings from the primary literature. These questions are designed to connect the theme to basic concepts from oceanography, marine biology, the Earth climate system and human-ocean interactions.

    Prerequisites: SMS 100, CHY 121 and CHY 123 and Junior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 373 - Marine and Freshwater Algae


    A comprehensive introduction to the algae (freshwater and marine), including their evolution, physiology, life histories, and ecology. All aspects of the course emphasize the fundamental roles of the algae in shaping the evolution of other life on Earth and determining characteristics of different ecosystems and food webs. Laboratory work will emphasize the study of living material and include special projects and field trips. Students will become competent microscopists. Course may have field trips during class times.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and the General Education Laboratory Science

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    SMS 374 - Deep Sea Biology


    70% of this planet is ocean, and 90% of that ocean lies at depths beyond human reach without significant technological help.  The Deep-sea is arguably the largest ecosystem on the planet. This course will provide an introduction to scientific exploration and study of deep ecosystems and organisms around the world. Topics considered will be broad, covering historical aspects of deep-sea discovery, the physical environment, how organisms function at depth, specific environments and ecosystems (e.g. hydrothermal vents, seamounts, cold-water coral ecosystems) and human uses of the deep-sea.

    General Education Requirements:  Population and Environment and Applied Science

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 122 or SMS 100

    Course Typically Offered: Spring and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 375 - Introduction to Marine Science Data Analysis and Computer Programming


    An introduction to the exploration, management, analysis, and graphical visualization of large data sets used in marine sciences and the computer programming tools that make this possible. Focuses on the widely used programming language and data analysis package MATLAB. A hands-on skills-oriented course with no exams: uses explanatory lectures, on-line and in-class tutorials/exercises and a student-driven term project.

    Prerequisites: STS 232 and SMS 204 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 400 - Capstone Research Experience in Marine Science


    Capstone research project or research paper for students obtaining the Bachelor of Science in Marine Science.  Marine Science majors must complete at least three credits of SMS 400 and one credit of SMS 404 to satisfy the Capstone requirement for graduation.  Students are advised to complete SMS 400 during the senior year.

    General Education Requirements: Together with SMS 404, this course satisfies both the General Education Writing Intensive requirement and the General Education Capstone Experience requirement.  A minimum of 3 credits of SMS 400 & 1 credit of SMS 404 are needed to fulfill either requirement.

    Prerequisites: Senior Standing and Department consent required.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring and Summer

    Credits: 1-4
  
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    SMS 401 - Critical Issues in Aquaculture


    Current and historically important issues facing the development of the aquaculture industry. Issues related to aquaculture will be researched by students who will present the issues in a series of debates. Course may have field trips during class times. This course may be repeated for up to six credits total.  Lec 1.

    Prerequisites: SMS 211, SMS 409 and SMS 420.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    SMS 402 - Oceans and Climate Change


    Stresses the interdisciplinary nature of marine science by focusing on comprehensive oceanographic and marine ecosystems that reinforce geological, chemical, physical and biological principles and their linkages. Roles of oceans in regulating global climate will be emphasized.  Climatic forcing and its impact on ocean environments and marine ecosystems will be discussed. Variability in the oceans and processes at a range of spatial and temporal scales are considered. Topics include: global carbon cycle and climate change, thermohaline circulation, influence of oceanic and climatic processes on marine populations, world fisheries and marine ecosystems, El Nino and decadal climate variability, Gulf of Maine oceanography and living marine resources, human activities and their impact on the environment.  Lec 3.

    Prerequisites:  SMS 100 and Junior or Senior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 404 - Capstone Seminar in Marine Science


    Seminar required of all SMS students, preferably in the semester when SMS 400 is first elected. Students will discuss selected special topics in marine sciences with emphasis on principles of scientific communication (e.g., process, traditional and electronic styles of publication, ethics). Students will develop and present synopses of their SMS 400 projects in the seminar using IT tools (e.g. PowerPoint for oral presentations and preparation of poster displays.

    General Education Requirements: Together with SMS 400, this course satisfies both the Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience.  A minimum of 3 credits of SMS 400 & 1 credit of SMS 404 are needed to fulfill either requirement.

    Prerequisites: 12 credit hours of SMS courses and a minimum of 60 credit hours in all university courses (junior standing); students are advised to complete SMS 400 and SMS 404 during their senior year.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    SMS 416 - Marine Engineering Literacy


    A hands-on project-based class. Major focus areas include: Programming, Sensors, and Robotics. By the end of the class, students should have a basic understanding of what programming is, and they will be able to build a simple electronic sensor, calibrate it and program its output to a computer, and build/program a Lego robot to do specific missions (for example, an underwater ROV or AUV taking data while diving in water).

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in both SMS 204 and PHY 112 or PHY 122

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 422 - Biology of Fishes


    A comprehensive course in evolution, morphology, physiology, life histories and ecology of fishes. Emphasis will be integrating knowledge of functional and physiological design to understand how fish function and how they have adapted to diverse environments. Course will include field trips during class hours and on weekends.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 423 - The Biology of Sharks


    In this course students will develop a sound understanding of shark and elasmobranch biology.  The course will take an evolutionary and comparative physiological approach to the many orders of elasmobranchs.  The course will explore five major areas of shark biology and the current challenges to sharks in the modern world; shark evolution, shark ecology, shark physiology, shark behavior and shark fisheries.  We will also look at the current pressures humans exert on sharks, particularly those caused by overfishing, and the issues surrounding captive sharks in public aquaria.  By the end of the course, the students should have a sound understanding of how sharks are adapted to their environments and why they have remained one of the most successful groups of vertebrates over the last 420 million years.  If this course was taken as a topics course in SMS 491, it cannot be repeated for credit.   

    Prerequisites: SMS 322 or SMS 422

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 425 - Applied Population Genetics


    Covers the biological, mathematical and statistical principles of population genetics. Topics include a discussion of the role of mutation, migration, selection and inbreeding in structuring the genetic variation for both Mendelian and quantitative traits in natural and artificial populations. Emphasis is placed on both the theoretical and experimental approaches to the study of population genetics and the application and importance of population genetics to disciplines such as marine science, wildlife and conservation biology, ecology and animal husbandry, including aquaculture.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 430 - Microbes in the Marine Environment


    This course examines the molecular building blocks of cells, structure and function of cells (Bacteria, Archaea, and eukaryotes) and cellular metabolism in the context of the marine environment, with a primary focus on microbes.  Viruses and their role in evolution of microbes and nutrient cycling in the ocean are discussed.  Basic molecular information is integrated into understanding evolutionary processes and mechanism of microbial interaction with higher organisms, symbiotic and pathogenic in the marine environment.  Microbes in extreme environments are explored to demonstrate how molecular and cellular adaptations play out in different marine environments. Biochemical and microbial processes that are critical to the maintenance and function of the biosphere are examined, with examples from marine environments. Overall, students in this course will learn how to ingrate across different spatial scales, from molecules to ecosystems, and approaches, from cellular biology to evolution. If this course was taken as a topics course in SMS 491, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing and BIO 100 and CHY 121

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 449 - Aquaculture Systems


    Introduction to the application of engineering principles and practices to the commercial culture of marine and freshwater plants and animals. No engineering or engineering technology majors.

    Prerequisites: SMS 211

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SMS 450 - Field Experience in Marine Sciences


    An approved field, research or work experience that contributes to the academic major and for which academic credit is given. The program of study is agreed upon by the student and the faculty advisor and may include independent research or work experience in the public or private sector. May also be taken as a field or laboratory supplement to an SMS lecture course and as such is required for certain courses offered as part of the Semester-by-the-Sea program. A written report or reports are required. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1 - 16

  
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    SMS 479 - Semester-by-the-Sea: Microbial Ecology


    Microbes-Bacteria, Archaea, and single celled eukaryotes - are the most diverse group of organisms on Earth.  Microbes underlie the ecological function of every ecosystem, and are wonderfully mysterious and exciting to study.  This field and lab based course will introduce students to methods used to investigate microbial diversity and habitats in the marine environment.  This course emphasizes learning the scientific process first hand through the lens of microbial ecology. Students will become familiar with molecular techniques and sequence data and how they are analyzed to understand microbial diversity.  Students will quantify chemical gradients and reaction rates that influence microbial activities and distribution in the marine environment.  They will learn about metabolic diversity of microbes and how this diversity plays out on broader ecological scales.  Students will conduct experiments and analyze and interpret results, with an overall emphasis on investigative learning and integration with prior knowledge through writing and presentations. If this course was taken as a topics course in SMS 491, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Jr. Standing and BIO 100 and CHY 121

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    SMS 480 - Semester-by-the-Sea: Biology of Marine Invertebrates


    Emphasis will be on body plan and design of marine invertebrates, including investigating how body design facilitates living in selected marine habitats. After a quick review of the marine phyla, lectures will discuss functional organization of invertebrates’ bodies, including embryology and development. Emphasis in the lab sessions is on identification of coastal Maine invertebrates. Lectures, labs and field trips are integrated into a single class experience that is taught one entire day per week at the Darling Marine Center. NOTE: Because of overlap, BIO 353 and SMS 480 cannot both be taken for degree credit. Course may have field trips during class times.

    Prerequisites: SMS 100 and SMS 201 or BIO 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    SMS 483 - Ecology of Zooplankton and Ichthyoplankton


    This course presents the world of zooplankton (including larval fish), how we study it, and our current understanding of zooplankton’s role in marine ecosystems. Students receive training in taxonomy and identification, sampling techniques and measurement of rate processes used in determining zooplankton fluxes and population dynamics. Fundamental concepts about biodiversity, trophic ecology, population dynamics, recruitment, and the influence of climate change on pelagic ecosystems are examined. Students participate in plankton monitoring at coastal stations and learn to sample and identify local zooplankton and planktonic stages of fish. Readings include research in the primary literature. The goal is to provide students with an experience of the richness and complexity of zooplankton in their natural environment while learning ecological concepts, methodology, and critical analysis of data.

    This course fulfills 20 hours of the SMS field requirement.

    SMS 483 was offered previously as SMS 491 (Special Topics). Students may not take this course for credit if they already took the Special Topics version with the same title.

    Prerequisites: SMS 100, MAT 126, and STS 232

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4

  
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    SMS 484 - SBS: Estuarine Oceanography


    The course examines estuaries from an environmental perspective - how geomorphology, rivers, tides, and human alterations control the physical and biological properties of estuarine habitats. Fieldwork in mid-coast Maine estuaries includes visits to various habitats with human impacts, and hydrographic surveys that use various water, sediment and biota samplers, field sensors, laboratory and modeling approaches. Students will learn how planktonic and sessile organisms respond to forcings from land and the ocean. This course is part of Semester by the Sea at the Darling Marine Center in Walpole, Maine. Because it is a field-intensive course, it can be used towards the marine science field experience requirement.

    Prerequisites: SMS 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    SMS 491 - Problems in Marine Science


    Undergraduate studies of current problems in marine science directed by individual faculty. May be experimental or theoretical independent research or directed readings by an individual student. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar
  
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    SMS 497 - Independent Study in Marine Science


    A readings, lecture, laboratory or seminar study course arranged between instructor and individual students, covering selected topics or areas within the field of Marine Science. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-4

Marketing

  
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    MKT 270 - Marketing


    Introduces students to the concepts, analyses, and activities that comprise marketing strategy and tactics, and provides practice in assessing and solving strategic and tactical problems in marketing.  The course is a foundation for advanced courses in marketing.  Topics include: marketing strategy (segmentation, targeting and positioning), market environmental analysis, consumer behavior, marketing research, product management, pricing, marketing communications, and channels of distribution.

    Prerequisites: Business, Economics or Financial Economic Major or Declared Business and/or Marketing Minor and Sophomore Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 371 - Services Marketing


    An in-depth examination of the marketing of services and the role of services in supporting the marketing of tangible products. The distinction between the marketing of tangibles and intangibles will be stressed. The course will identify and examine the distinct issues which are encountered in the marketing of services and will explore appropriate strategies for implementing services marketing programs, primarily in services organizations (i.e. healthcare, tourism, banking, education, etc.). Specifically, the course will examine, in detail, the role of people in delivering services, the importance of service quality as a strategic differentiating tool, and the importance of collaboration between marketing and human resources management in the delivery of services.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MKT 270 and Junior or Senior standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 372 - Integrated Marketing Communication


    This course is designed for students who want to understand integrated marketing communications and how all forms of communications work to achieve organizational objectives and contribute to the “brand.” It examines a wide range of consumer/customer communications-advertising, public relations, promotion, Internet, direct marketing, digital and social media, event marketing, point-of-purchase, and other alternative media.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MKT 270.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 374 - Personal Selling and Sales Management


    An overview of professional selling, with an emphasis on the sales process, and an understanding of sales management. It is designed for the student to gain a greater appreciation, understanding, and respect for sales, especially the concept of relationship selling, and the techniques, policies and challenges involved in managing a sales force. The student will also gain a better understanding of how sales fits into the overall marketing function and the organization as a whole.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MKT 270.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 375 - Retail Management


    An introduction to the strategies and tactics of retail management from a marketing management perspective.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MKT 270.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 376 - International Marketing


    Focuses on marketing principles and strategies valuable to the successful conduct of international business operations. Differing business environments will be examined in order to sensitize students to necessary adjustments in marketing strategies.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MGT 343 and MKT 270; junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 378 - Marketing Research


    Considers marketing research as a tool for marketing decision making.  Emphasis on problem formulation, research design, research methodology, sampling, data analysis and interpretation.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MKT 270, STS 215 or STS 232; junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 382 - Consumer Behavior


    This course presents a comprehensive framework for understanding why and how people consume.  It investigates the pre-purchase, purchase and post-purchase stages of the consumption process.  It draws on the social sciences to understand the psychological, situational, technological, social and cultural factors influencing the consumption process.  Specific topics include perception, motivation, attitudes, values, self-concept, personality, lifestyle, consumer decision-making process, shopping and buying, group influences, consumption subcultures, and global consumer culture.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MKT 270 and Junior or Senior Standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 455 - Sport Marketing


    Sports are uniquely creative and there are many aspects that cause them to behave differently from other brands, businesses, and organizations. This course is intended to introduce students to the world of sports business from a strategic marketing perspective. An historical perspective of the industry will provide the necessary framework to gain insight into the present and future sports marketing environment. The basic principles of marketing and marketing management as applied to the sports industry will be emphasized. Specific topics include segmentation, product, distribution, and pricing decisions, marketing through sport sponsorships, endorsements, licensing, sport media, marketing communications, and emerging issues in sports marketing.

    Prerequisites: MKT 270

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 476 - New Product Management


    New products and services are vital to the success of all companies. However, innovation is risky and most new products fail in the marketplace. The course focuses on the tools and techniques associated with selecting and analyzing market opportunities. It also examines the processes involved in designing, testing, and introducing new products and services that capitalize on those opportunities and fit company strategy. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are covered. In particular, the course covers new product development processes, product development project management, market entry strategies, new product idea generation, and forecasting market demand. All types of product development projects are considered from breakthrough products to new platforms to brand and line extensions to product improvements in the context of both large corporations and small entrepreneurial firms. 

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 480 - Managerial Marketing


    Emphasizes the integration of marketing, as an organization activity, with other activities of the business firm. Explores problems encountered by top marketing executives in modern business.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MKT 378 or MKT 382 and Senior Standing or by instructor permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKT 490 - Special Topics in Marketing


    Study of various aspects of functional areas of Marketing. Topics vary depending on faculty and student interests. May be repeated for credit of the topics differ.

    Prerequisites: MKT 270 and Junior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MAT 101 - The Nature and Language of Mathematics


    An opportunity for non-science majors to broaden their understanding of mathematics and to examine the connections between mathematics and other areas of human understanding.  Specific topics may vary from semester to semester and are chosen to provide students with the opportunity to explore, through inquiry and discovery, the development, structure, and application of mathematical systems.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 103 - Elementary Algebraic Models in Our World


    An introduction to the applications of algebra with a focus on data analysis and model building.  Topics include graphs, algebraic equations and functions.  Primary attention will be given to using linear, quadratic and exponential functions to represent and interpret real world applications.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 107 - Elementary Descriptive Geometry


    Designed to prepare students to teach the geometry included in a modern NCTM STANDARDS based K-8 curriculum. Emphasis will be on geometric exploration activities, problem solving and informal deductive reasoning using many of the manipulatives used to teach geometric concepts in grades K-8.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: High school geometry required.  Elementary Education, Child Development-Early Childhood Education, and Art Education majors only.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 108 - Elementary Numerical Mathematics From A Modern Perspective


    Designed to prepare students to teach the non-geometric mathematics included in a modern NCTM STANDARDS based K-8 curriculum. Emphasis will be on the structure of arithmetic, development of good number sense, basic number theory, understanding probability and the use of descriptive statistics. Focuses on problem solving, and the development of arithmetic and algebraic reasoning skills.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: Elementary Education, Child Development-Early Childhood Education, and Art Education majors only.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 111 - Algebra for College Mathematics


    This course covers the basic topics in algebra needed to enter a mathematics course at the precalculus level. The covered topics include a brief review of the real number system (including absolute value, exponents, roots, and radicals), linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, graphs, functions (primarily linear and other polynomial), factoring, rational and radical expressions. Optional topics include systems of equations, variation, exponential and logarithmic functions. Note: This course does not satisfy the General Education in Quantitative Literacy Requirement.

    Prerequisites: Adequate performance on Mathematics Placement Exam.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 115 - Applied Mathematics for Business and Economics


    Topics in discrete mathematics, finite mathematics, and calculus with applications to business and economics.  Topics include linear functions and regressions, the mathematics of finance, probability, and differential calculus.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 111, or no grade record in MAT 111 and a passing score on Part 2 of the Math Placement Exam.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 116 - Introduction to Calculus


    A three-credit introduction to calculus primarily intended for students in business, life sciences, or social sciences.  The focus is on concepts and applications, utilizing numerical, graphical, and algebraic approaches and uses of technology.  Topics include functions (algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and elementary trig functions), and an overview of differential and integral calculus.  

    Due to overlapping content, credit previously earned for MAT 126 will be removed upon completion of MAT 116. Both grades will appear on the transcript and will be utilized in GPA calculations. 

    Departmental permission to enroll is required if previously completed MAT 126.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 111, or no grade record in MAT 111 and a passing score in Part 2 of the Math Placement Exam.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    MAT 117 - Applications of Calculus


    A three-credit continuation to the introduction to calculus (MAT 116) primarily intended for students in business, life sciences, or social sciences. The focus is on applications and concepts, utilizing numerical, graphical and algebraic approaches and uses of technology. Utilizing and expanding on the variety of problem solving approaches developed in MAT 116, the focus will be on applications (such as optimization and accumulation) and additional topics including differential equations. 

    Due to overlapping content, credit previously earned for MAT 127 will be removed upon completion of MAT 117. Both grades will appear on the transcript and will be utilized in GPA calculations. 

    Departmental permission to enroll is required if previously completed MAT 127.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 116 or MAT 126

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    MAT 122 - Pre-Calculus


    Designed as a transitional course between high school algebra and college mathematics, particularly calculus.  Topics include a detailed study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, stressing ideas needed by those who will take calculus.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 111, or no grade record in MAT 111 and a passing score on Part 2 of the Math Placement Exam.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MAT 126 - Calculus I


    An introduction to calculus for students in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences.  Covers the differential calculus of the algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, concluding with the definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus.  The approach is intuitive and geometric, with emphasis on understanding the basic concepts of function, limit, derivative and integral.

    Departmental permission to enroll is required if previously completed MAT 116. Due to overlapping content, course repeat rules are applicable for MAT 126 and MAT 136.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 122, or no grade record in MAT 122 and a passing score on Part 3 of the Math Placement Exam.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MAT 127 - Calculus II


    Completes the study of single-variable calculus.  Topics covered include inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, methods of integration, improper integrals, indeterminate forms, parametric equations, polar coordinates and infinite series.

    Departmental permission to enroll is required if previously completed MAT 117. Due to overlapping content, course repeat rules are applicable for MAT 127 and MAT 137.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 126 at the University of Maine or other system campuses. (Students who have transferred an equivalent class to UMaine will need to contact the Math Department for registration and advising where appropriate.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MAT 136 - Honors Level Calculus I


    A more challenging introduction to calculus for students in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences. Covers differential and integral calculus of real functions of one variable, up to and including the fundamental theorem of calculus. The topics presented are similar to those in MAT 126, but theoretical concepts receive greater emphasis and problems of greater depth and scope are considered.

    Due to overlapping content, course repeat rules are applicable for MAT 126 and MAT 136.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: Departmental permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MAT 137 - Honors Level Calculus II


    A more challenging continuation of a single-variable calculus for students in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences. Covers integral calculus of real functions of one variable including integration techniques and applications, differential equations, infinite sequences and series, uniform convergence, and Taylor series. The topics covered are similar to those in MAT 127, but theoretical concepts receive greater emphasis and problems of greater depth and scope are considered.

    Due to overlapping content, course repeat rules are applicable for MAT 127 and MAT 137.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: C or better in MAT 136 or department permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MAT 228 - Calculus III


    For students of mathematics, engineering and the sciences. Vector algebra, geometry and calculus; multivariable differential and integral calculus, including the theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 127 at the University of Maine or other system campuses. (Students who have transferred an equivalent class to UMaine will need to contact the Math Department for registration and advising where appropriate.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MAT 258 - Introduction to Differential Equations with Linear Algebra


    An introduction to elementary linear algebra and ordinary differential equations including applications.

    Due to overlapping content, credit previously earned for MAT 259 and MAT 262 will be removed upon completion of MAT 258. Both grades will appear on the transcript and will be utilized in GPA calculations. (Not open to students who have already taken MAT 262 or MAT 259.)

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 127 at the University of Maine or other system campuses. (Students who have transferred an equivalent class to UMaine will need to contact the Math Department for registration and advising where appropriate.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MAT 259 - Differential Equations


    The theory and applications of ordinary differential equations for science and mathematics students intending to take further courses in applied mathematics.  (Note: Students planning to take MAT 262 or MAT 453 should choose MAT 259 instead of MAT 258.)  

    Due to overlapping content, credit previously earned for MAT 258  will be removed upon completion of MAT 259. Both grades will appear on the transcript and will be utilized in GPA calculations.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 228.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    MAT 261 - Introduction to Abstract Mathematics


    Topics covered typically include logic, basic set theory, relations and functions, sequences, limits, cardinality, and algebraic and geometric structures, but may vary somewhat with the instructor. Class size will remain small, not to exceed 20 students. The goal is to enable students to read, critique, construct, and write mathematical proofs. At least 40% of the student’s grade will be based on the quality of written work. Written assignments must present mathematical arguments in a clear, logical manner, using standard mathematical notation as well as correct English grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Students will be given considerable coaching and feedback with preliminary drafts so that submitted final versions of their work will be of acceptable quality.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 127 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 262 - Linear Algebra


    An introduction to matrices, systems of linear equations, linear transformations, determinants, vector spaces, orthogonality, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, with applications.  Some use will be made of mathematical software.  

    Due to overlapping content, credit previously earned for MAT 258 will be removed upon completion of MAT 262. Both grades will appear on the transcript and will be utilized in GPA calculations.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 127.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    MAT 300 - Topics in Mathematics


    Topics in mathematics not regularly covered in other courses. Content varies to suit current needs. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of department.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    MAT 329 - Problems Seminar II


    Problem-solving in selected areas of mathematics. Material will be taken from various problem books, competitions and mathematical periodicals. Recommended for students who wish to participate in the annual Putnam competition. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 261 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    MAT 400 - Topics in Mathematics


    Topics in mathematics not regularly covered in other courses. Content varies to suit current needs. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of department.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    MAT 401 - Capstone Seminar in Mathematics


    Required of all mathematics and statistics majors. Students will be asked to draw upon and integrate their mathematics course work by exploring mathematical topics in their historical and scientific context. Students are expected to exhibit innovative problem-solving and thoughtful writing. Each student will be required to write a paper on the topic under investigation and to present the results in a colloquium talk to the class.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 261, MAT 262 and senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 425 - Introduction to Real Analysis I


    A study of functions of a real variable and the related topology of the real line. Concepts of limit, convergence, continuity and differentiability are studied.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 228 and MAT 261.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 426 - Introduction to Real Analysis II


    A continuation of MAT 425 emphasizing integration and sequences and series of functions. Contents may vary from year to year.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 425.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 445 - History of Mathematics


    Deals with the lives and times of mathematicians, while focusing on mathematical ideas. Designed to acquaint the student with the evolution of various mathematical disciplines and to develop an appreciation of the problems faced by and often solved by mathematicians.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 127 or Department permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 451 - Dynamical Systems


    A study of the nature and behavior of solutions of linear and nonlinear systems of differential and difference equations through mathematical analysis and the use of available menu-driven PC software. For students in mathematics and the sciences. Some knowledge of vectors and matrices and some familiarity with personal computers is recommended.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 258 or MAT 259 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 452 - Complex Analysis


    An introduction to functions of complex variables including differentiation, integration, series, mappings and applications.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 228.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 453 - Partial Differential Equations I


    Introduction to general properties of partial differential equations followed by solutions of specific equations. Techniques include eigen function expansions, operational methods, and Green’s functions.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 259 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 454 - Partial Differential Equations II


    A continuation of MAT 453.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 453.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 463 - Introduction to Abstract Algebra I


    A study of algebraic systems characterized by specific axiom systems. Begins with a study of sets theory, functions, and operations, and continues with topics selected from group theory, ring theory, and linear algebra.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 261 and MAT 262.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 464 - Introduction to Abstract Algebra II


    A continuation of MAT 463, with emphasis on properties of rings and fields and culminating in Galsis Theory.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 463.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 465 - Theory of Numbers


    Elementary properties of integers including divisibility, prime and composite numbers, uniqueness of prime factorization, Diophantine equations, congruences and continued fractions.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 261 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 471 - Differential Geometry


    The application of multivariable calculus to the study of curves, surfaces and their higher-dimensional analogues.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 228 and in either MAT 258 or MAT 262.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 475 - Higher Geometry


    Topics include: constructions, Euclidean properties, Ceva’s and Menelaus’ theorems with applications–Desargues’, Pappus’ and Pascal’s theorems, isometries, axiometric approach to one of the geometries, algebraic models for geometry, Klein’s Erlanger program, classical construction problems.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 228 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 481 - Discrete Mathematics


    Primarily designed for both mathematics and computer science majors. While the calculus-based mathematics of classical engineering and physical science is essentially “continuous,” the finite mathematics of computer science and some social sciences is essentially “discrete” or “combinatorial.” MAT 481 is an introductory course offered in this spirit. Topics covered typically include graphs and networks, analysis of algorithms, generating functions and recurrence relations, graph coloring, satisfiability, computational complexity, automata and languages, Turing machines and computability, and a brief introduction to the theory of NP-completeness.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 261 or MAT 262 or Department permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 486 - Biological Modeling and Simulation


    Mathematical and computational models primarily from population biology and epidemiology, including deterministic and stochasitc, discrete- and continuous-time, and spatial and network models.  A software package such as Matlab or R will be used for simulations and visualization, and for additional topics such as vectorized calculations, function optimization, and differential equation solvers, which have a wide variety of applications in the sciences and engineering.  Some basic familiarity with probability is recommended.

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAT 487 - Numerical Analysis


     

    An introduction to computational methods for solving numerical problems.  Topics such as interpolation, systems of linear or nonlinear equations, numerical integration, eigenvalues, optimization, ordinary and partial differential equations are considered.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 127 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3

 

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