Aug 15, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Biology

  
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    BIO 122 - Biology: The Living Science


    Intended for non-majors, this course examines the processes and principles of science across disciplines.  Focused examples are presented from topics such as ecology, evolution, and cellular biology.  The role of science in the resolution of ethical issues regarding the impact of the human population on the environment will be emphasized. This course cannot be applied to Biology, Botany, Zoology, or Medical Laboratory Science major requirements.

     

    General Education Requirements: Together with BIO 123, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement. If taken without BIO 123, this course Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge Requirement.

    It also satisfies the Population and Environmental Sciences Requirement. 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    BIO 123 - Biology: The Living Science Laboratory


    A laboratory course, intended for non-majors, focused on examination of the processes and principles of science across disciplines.  Exercises are presented from topics such as ecology, evolution and cellular biology. This course cannot be applied to Biology, Botany, Zoology or Medical Laboratory Science major requirements. Lab 2. 

    General Education Requirements: Together with BIO 122, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Science Requirement.

    Prerequisites: BIO 122 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    BIO 200 - Biology of Organisms


    Introduces functions (physiology) and structures (anatomy, morphology) of animals and plants stressing basic physiological processes and adaptations to the environment. Equal attention is given to plants and animals. Lec 3, Lab 3.

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in BIO 100 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 205 - Field Natural History of Maine


    The plant and animal life and physical features of aquatic, wetland, and terrestrial ecosystems in Maine, observed during five weekday afternoon field trips and two full single-day trips on separate weekends during the first half of the semester. Each student carries out an independent field natural history project culminating in a research paper during a five-week project period (no classes) in the second half of the semester. The course concludes with a half-day field trip on winter natural history. Lec 2, Field 4.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 100 or SFR 100 or PSE 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 208 - Anatomy and Physiology


    An intermediate lecture and laboratory course on the structure of the human body and how it works.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in BIO 100 or BMB 280, PHY 122, CHY 122, and CHY 124.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 302 - Critical Reading and Verbal Reasoning


    Excellent critical reading skills are essential for scientists, social scientists, lawyers, medical personnel, and other professionals.  This course will focus on building skills in discerning major themes of written materials, summarizing main points, identifying the intent of writing, and making conclusions.  The course will develop students’ critical reading and verbal reasoning skills - the ability to analyze, evaluate, and complete arguments as they occur in ordinary language drawn from a wide variety of sources, from science, ethics, philosophy, anthropology, literature, health, psychology, social sciences, and humanities.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 and Sophomore standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 307 - Interdisciplinary Neuroscience


    An interdisciplinary overview of the biology of nervous systems, including cellular and molecular biology, physiology, histology, neuroanatomy, modern neuroscience techniques, neurological conditions, and a strong emphasis on transferable scientific skills such as critical thinking, writing, working with data, and reading research literature.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in BIO 200 or SMS 201 or BMB/HON 155; or BIO 100 and PSY 100 and Neuroscience minor; or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 309 - Sustainability and Conservation Travel Study


    The sustainable management of ecosystems is essential for the long-term preservation of biological and cultural natural resources.  Today, tropical and subtropical countries are experiencing a variety of unique environmental challenges, all compounded by the effects of global climate change, including loss of biological diversity, invasive species, food insecurity and freshwater scarcity, soaring energy production and storage costs, and accumulation of waste.  The scientific solutions to these intractable problems lie in interdisciplinary research efforts.  This travel study course examines real-world sustainability and conservation challenges and solutions in an ecosystem under stress due to global climate change.  BIO 319 or WLE 200 or SMS 300 are recommended prerequisites.

    If this course was taken as a topics course in BIO 387, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall (with travel in winter term)

    Credits: 3

  
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    BIO 310 - Plant Biology


    Examines the structure (morphology, anatomy), function (physiology), reproduction, ecology, and systematic significance of the major groups of plants. Emphasis will be given to the flowering plants and the ecology of the various plant groups. Lec 3, Lab 3. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or PSE 100 or SFR 100 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 311 - Animal Ecophysiology


    Animal ecophysiology is the study of how animal forms and function are shaped by the environment. This course explores the physiological processes of animals with emphasis on energy metabolism, integrative organismal systems, and homeostatis.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or BIO 208 or SMS 201

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd years

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 319 - General Ecology


    Ecological principles for the science major including environmental factors, population ecology, community ecology and ecosystem analysis. Course will include field trips during class hours. CHY 122 or BMB 208 recommended.

    Prerequisites: CHY 121 or BMB 207 and BIO 200 or SMS 201 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 326 - General Entomology


    Fundamental principles of insect life and the relation of insects to plants, animals, and humans. Laboratory includes a study of structure, and systematics. An insect collection is required. Lec 3, Lab 3. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 327 - Introductory Applied Entomology


    An introduction to entomology with emphasis on regulating populations of pest insects and the fundamentals of insect biology which influence insect populations. Laboratory emphasizes identification and sight recognition of insects of importance to ornamental plants and field crops. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 or PSE 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 329 - Vertebrate Biology


    An introduction to the classes of vertebrates, their characteristics, evolution, reproduction and locomotion. Emphasis on adaptive aspects of structure and life histories. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites:  A grade of C- or better in BIO 200 or in SMS 201.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 331 - Vertebrate Biology Laboratory


    A study of taxonomy of regional vertebrate fauna including structure and function of representatives of vertebrate classes and taxonomy of local vertebrates. Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: BIO 329 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    BIO 335 - Human Anatomy


    An intermediate course that introduces the study of human anatomy through examination of the structure of the human body and other vertebrates. It emphasizes the relationship between structure and function and encourages the development of skills in dissection and interpretation of anatomical specimens. Intended for students interested in further studies in medicine or pathology.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 336 - Developmental Biology


    Considers the transformation of the fertilized egg into a new adult individual including the concepts of growth and development of organisms. Lec 2, Lab 4. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 342 - Plants in Our World


    Botany and the role plants play in current and historical human society and ecology. Topics in agriculture and forestry including genetic engineering, biodiversity, and plant-based drugs. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment Requirement.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 350 - Genetics


    Introductory course that integrates classical Mendelian genetics with the chromosomal, biochemical and molecular bases of inheritance.  It also includes concepts of population biology within the context of genetics and current applications of modern genetic technology in everyday life.  Intended for students who may not need to take advanced level classes in molecular biosciences. 

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- BIO 200, or SMS 201, or BMB/HON 155

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 353 - Invertebrate Zoology


    The morphology, ecology, life histories and phylogenetic relationships of non-vertebrate animals, excluding insects and parasites. NOTE: Because of overlap, BIO 353 and SMS 480 cannot both be taken for degree credit. Lec 3, Lab 3. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 354 - Animal Behavior


    Examines broad array of non-human behavior and the underlying physiological and ecological factors that shape its expression.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 200 or in SMS 201.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 365 - Evolution


    The origin and development of evolutionary theory and the mechanisms which bring about the genetic differentiation of groups of organisms. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 377 - Medical Physiology


    Physiological processes in humans with emphasis on the integration of organ systems.  A pre-professional course for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-graduate school, and exercise physiology students.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or BIO 208 or SMS 201, and either CHY 122 or BMB 208

    Course Typically Offered: Spring and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 378 - Medical Physiology Laboratory


    Experimental analysis of physiological processes. Some animal surgery is involved. Lab 4.

    Prerequisites: BIO 377 concurrently or previously and 1 year of chemistry.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    BIO 387 - Undergraduate Research in Biology


    Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors who have special interest and qualifications in some branch of applied biological research. (May be repeated for credit until a total of 6 credits have been earned; 3 credits may be used towards the 24 total credits required in the biological science areas.)

    Prerequisites: Minimum sophomore standing and departmental consent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6
  
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    BIO 388 - Research Capstone in Biology


    Open to seniors who have special interest and qualifications in some branch of biological research.  (May be repeated for credit until a total of 3 credits has been earned.)

    General Education Requirements: A total of 3 credits are required to satisfy the General Education Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience Requirements.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of department.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    BIO 391 - Undergraduate Independent Study in Biology


    Open to students who are interested in independent exploration of biological concepts. May be repeated for credit until a total of 6 credits has been earned, 3 credits may be used towards the 24 total credits required in the biological science areas.


     

    Prerequisites: Departmental Consent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6

  
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    BIO 392 - Independent Study Capstone in Biology


    Independent Study.  (May be repeated for credit until a total of 3 credits have been earned.)

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience Requirements (a total of 3 credits are required).

    Prerequisites: Permission of department.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    BIO 396 - Field Experience in Biology


    An approved work experience which contributes to the academic major and for which academic credit is given. Students may work part time or full time for a semester and have the opportunity to gain practical experience in a job related to their professional career goals.

     (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1 - 6

  
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    BIO 400 - Biological Sciences Writing Intensive


    Designed to supplement existing courses in Biology. Additional writing will be required in conjunction with regular course work providing students with intensive writing in their major discipline. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 4 credit hours.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Permission; must be taken concurrently with one Biology course.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1-2
  
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    BIO 402 - Capstone Experience in Biological Sciences


    A senior-year experience for Biology, Botany and Zoology majors that emphasizes important biological concepts by synthesizing and augmenting prior learning. Utilizes class discussions, group participation, readings, formal student classroom presentations and a senior paper. . Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in Biology, Botany or Zoology.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 405 - Medical Laboratory Methods of Infectious Disease


    Examines the medically important parasites causing human infection, associated epidemiology and current laboratory methods employed for diagnosis. The major groups of pathogenic fungi are also discussed, including laboratory procedures for detection and identification. Applications of immunochemical and molecular methods used to diagnose or monitor a variety of infectious disease processes is emphasized. Lec 2, Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: BMB 300/BMB 305 and BMB 420/BMB 421 suggested. Medical Laboratory Science majors only or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 421 - Introduction to Medical Laboratory Methods


    An introduction to basic theory and laboratory practice in clinical hematology and urinalysis, including an introduction to the theory and function of relevant laboratory instruments. Required for Medical Laboratory Science majors.

    Prerequisites: Major of Medical Laboratory Sciences and BMB 322 or BMB 360 and BMB 323

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 422 - Clinical Hematology


    A comprehensive study of the principles, methodology and pathological states in hematology. Lectures and laboratory practice. (EMMC)

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 7
  
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    BIO 423 - Clinical Microbiology


    A comprehensive study of the principles and techniques of diagnostic microbiology and parasitology. Lectures and laboratory practice. (EMMC)

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 7
  
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    BIO 424 - Clinical Immunohematology


    Fundamental techniques of blood grouping and cross-matching proceeding to advanced studies of human blood groups, theory and practice in special problems, and advanced techniques. Lectures and laboratory practice. (EMMC)

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 7
  
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    BIO 425 - Clinical Chemistry


    Basic techniques of clinical chemistry proceeding to advanced theories and methodology. Includes theory and technique of immunochemistry. Lectures and laboratory practice. (EMMC)

    Prerequisites: BIO 421.

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 7
  
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    BIO 426 - Clinical Microscopy and Special Topics


    Lectures and laboratory practice in the microscopic examination of urine and body fluids.  Lectures and practice in laboratory management and education theory and methods.  Includes a research project on some aspect of clinical laboratory science.  (EMMC.)

    Course Note:  Students will be enrolled in this course for 2 credits for both fall and spring terms for a total of 4 credits for the academic year.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: BIO 421

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIO 428 - Issues in Plant Genetic Engineering


    Genetic engineering is an advanced genetic tool that can be impactful in society.  The development of genetic engineering is currently a topic of great interest to many and is relevant in other many aspects of our lives: from agriculture systems to food security, and from medicine to ecological restoration. By examining the cell, molecular and genetic underpinnings of biotechnology such as recombinant DNA, transformation and DNA editing, this course will provide the scientific basis to understand critical biotechnological advances.  Additionally, the history,

    General Education Requirements: Capstone Experience, Ethics, Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: BIO 350 or BMB 400 or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 430 - Ecology and Systematics of Aquatic Insects


    Taxonomy, life history and ecology of aquatic insects. Emphasis on role of insects in the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems in both natural and managed settings. Field trips during class hours, research project and collection required. Lec 2, Lab 4.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 431 - Emerging Infectious Diseases


    Recent decades have seen a sharp increase in infectious diseases new to humans (e.g., SARS, HIV/AIDS, Zika virus), accompanied by a resurgence of older diseases (e.g.,  tuberculosis, malaria) as new threats. At the same time, the “golden age” of belief that the war against infectious disease has been won by antibiotics is rapidly fading as pathogens evolve resistance to drug therapies. Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) greatly concern the scientific, medical, and public health communities and the general public, are inextricably linked to global politics and socio-economic conditions, and arouse controversy, fear, and blame. The goal of this course is to understand EIDs and realistically evaluate the threat to human well-being posed by infectious disease in modern society. Lec 3. Lab 3

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing and BIO 200 or BIO 208

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 432 - Biology of the Fungi


    Ecology, physiology and classification of the major groups of fungi and their impact on human affairs.  Laboratory and fieldwork will emphasize current techniques used to study fungi.  (Because of overlap, BIO 432 and BIO 532 cannot both be taken for degree credit.) Course will include field trips during class hours and on weekends.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 and BIO 200 and sophomore or higher standing; or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 433 - Mammalogy


    Considers the characteristics, functional anatomy, behavior and ecology of mammals. Lectures, laboratory study and field trips. Lec 3, Lab 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 329 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 434 - Avian Biology and Ecology


    Advanced discussion of the characteristics, functional morphology, behavior, evolution, biogeography, and ecology of birds. Lectures and an independent project. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites:  STS 232 or WLE 220, and BIO 200 or SMS 201, and BIO 319 or WLE 200 or SMS 300, or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 437 - Avian Biology and Ecology Laboratory


    This field and laboratory course emphasizes field skills critical for the investigation of wild birds. Its primary focus is on species identification and phylogenetic relationships, but students will also explore avian anatomy (and how it relates to identification and phylogeny) and will design and execute a simple study to answer an ecological question using real data gathered by the class (and past classes). Includes one required all day field trip on a weekend.

    Prerequisites: BIO 434 or concurrently

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 1
  
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    BIO 438 - Morphogenesis in Development and Disease


    Analysis of interacting systems in normal development and metastatic cancer and neuromuscular diseases. Study of regulation of morphogenesis and differentiation at the organ, tissue and cellular levels, with emphasis on experimental approaches towards problems in development, cancer biology, and neuromuscular diseases.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone Experience and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SMS 201 and Junior or Senior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 441 - Microscopy


    Principles of operation and practical application of equipment and techniques used to image and analyze the very small. Covers microscopy by light (conventional, laser, near-field), electron (transmission and scanning), ion, and scanning-probe instruments, and techniques for microanalysis of atomic and chemical composition and analysis of micrographs. Emphasis on, but not limited to, biological material.  Lec 3, Lab 1.

    Prerequisites: One year (two semesters) of chemistry and one year (two semesters) of physics and one year (two semesters) of biology

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 450 - Histology


    Microscopic anatomy of animal tissues. Lec 2, Lab 4. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone Experience and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and BIO 200 or BIO 208 or SMS 201 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 452 - Plant Physiology


    Physiological processes in plants, with emphasis on water relations, mineral nutrition and physiological ecology. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 and one year of chemistry; BIO 200 recommended.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 453 - Plant Physiology Laboratory


    Research design and laboratory study of the physiological function of plants. Lab 2

    Prerequisites: BIO 452 or concurrently or permission of the instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    BIO 455 - Biological Invasions


    Analysis of mechanisms behind species establishment in new areas, their impact on native ecology, theoretical bases of invasion-related phenomena, and economic and sociopolitical costs inflicted by exotic species.

    NOTE: BIO 455 and BIO 555 cannot both be taken for degree credit

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: BIO 319 or WLE 200 or SMS 300 or SMS 352 or SFR 407 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

  
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    BIO 463 - River Ecology


    An introduction to the ecology of rivers with emphasis on the role of physical and biological factors in controlling ecosystem processes and how these processes are influenced by human activities. Field trips and research projects required. Lec 2, Lab 4.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone Experience and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: BIO 319 or SMS 300 or WLE 200 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 464 - Taxonomy of Vascular Plants


    The primary emphasis is identification of major families and genera of flowering plants.  Topics relating to the origin of plant diversity - phylogeny, evolution, pollination, hybridization, biogeography, and the flora of Maine - are also considered. Lec 2, Rec 1, Lab 2. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SFR 100 or PSE 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 468 - Lake Ecology


    The ecology of inland waters, with emphasis on the physical, chemical and biological characteristic of lakes. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 and CHY 122/124 or BMB 208/210; BIO 319 or SMS 300 or WLE 200 recommended.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 474 - Neurobiology


    Focuses on the organization and function of the nervous systems in various animals. Specifically addresses how single nerve cells function; how groups of neurons interact; how systems of neurons provide brain function and behavior. Sensory and motor system interplay will be emphasized. Note: Because of overlap, BIO 474 and BIO 574 cannot be taken for degree credit.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in BIO 200 or in SMS 201, and CHY 122, and PHY 112 or PHY 121 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Falll and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 476 - Paleoecology


    Explores how paleoecology is used to expand the temporal scale over which ecologists pose and investigate questions.  Explores how climate change has affected terrestrial and freshwater systems over the Quaternary, and how lake ecosystems have changed in recent centuries.  NOTE: Because of overlap, BIO 476 and BIO 572 cannot both be taken for degree credit.  Lec 3, Lab 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 319 or BIO 468 or SFR 407 or SMS 300 or SMS 352 or WLE 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIO 479 - Endocrinology


    A comparative survey of vertebrate endocrine pathways, including hormone synthesis and regulation, associated with a wide array of animal behaviors, including courtship, parental care, dispersal, foraging, and migration. This course complements BIO 354 and BIO 524.

    Prerequisites:   BIO 377 or BIO 208 or BIO 311, and either BMB 280 or BIO 480 or BMB 300 or BMB 322  or BMB 360 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 480 - Cell Biology


    Examines the fundamental cellular, sub-cellular and molecular characteristics of cells with emphasis on structure and function of organelle systems common to eukaryotic cells. Note: Because of overlap, BIO 480 and BIO 580 cannot both be taken for degree credit. Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone Experience and Writing Intensive Requirements if taken together with BIO 483.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or BIO 208 or SMS 201 or BMB 155/HON 155, and either CHY 251 or BMB 221; Junior standing is highly recommended

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIO 483 - Cell Biology Laboratory


    A laboratory course consisting of exercises employing techniques commonly utilized in cell biological research, with an emphasis on mammalian cell culture, cellular energetics, and skills essential for a career involving cell biology lab work.

    Note: Because of overlap, BIO 483 and BIO 583 cannot both be taken for degree credit.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience and Writing Intensive Requirements if taken together with BIO 480.

    Prerequisites: BIO 480 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2


Biomedical Engineering

  
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    BEN 111 - Introduction to Biomedical Engineering I


    An introduction to the profession of biomedical engineering through a series of speakers, activities, projects, and presentations. The development of teamwork, professional practices, and presentation skills are emphasized.

    General Education Requirements: Together with BEN 477, BEN 479 and BEN 493 satisfies the General Education Requirement for Ethics.

    Prerequisites: First year students only.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    BEN 112 - Introduction to Biomedical Engineering II


    Commercial and public domain computer software for data acquisition, analysis, and graphical representation, as well as database searching, will be introduced.  The application of these tools is explore through group activities and hands-on design projects relevant to the biomedical engineering profession.

    Prerequisites: MAT 126 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    BEN 201 - Fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering


    Introduction to basic engineering concepts as they apply to biological systems; molecular and biochemical kinetics; thermodynamic principles, and their applications to material and energy balances in closed and open biological systems (biochemical cycles, cells, systems); integration of basic mathematical, chemical and physical concepts into biomedical engineering practice; introduction to the biomedical and biotechnology industries.

    Prerequisites: CHY 121, CHY 122, MAT 126 and MAT 127 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    BEN 202 - Transport Phenomena in Biomedical Systems


    Introduction into transport phenomena related to biological and engineered systems.  Topics to be covered include fluid dynamics, mass transfer, heat transfer, dimensional analysis, transport in complex systems, conservation laws and macroscopic balances.  These engineering tools will be applied to biological and engineered systems such as blood flow and transport across cell membranes, filtration, and separation.

    Prerequisites: A C- or better in BEN 201 and MAT 228 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    BEN 361 - Biomedical Engineering Laboratory I


    Principles of biomedical engineering are applied in the laboratory setting, using analogs of biomedical systems and appropriate instrumentation.  An emphasis is placed on formal written and oral reports.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: A grade of C-  or better in BEN 202, PHY 122, MAT 258 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    BEN 363 - Biomedical Engineering Laboratory II


    Application of engineering design principles to the development of biomedical products and instrumentation.  An emphasis is placed on formal written and oral reports.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in BEN 361, BEN 401, BEN 403, ECE 209 and STS 332 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    BEN 396 - Research Experience in Biomedical Engineering


    An approved research experience under the direct supervision of at least one faculty member.  Specific activities can include a combination of literature study, applied theory and modeling, and hands on laboratory practice.

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    BEN 401 - Applications in Biomedical Engineering


    Analysis of performance characteristics of biological systems in terms of material and energy balances, kinetics, and transport processes.  Approaches toward design of artificial assist devices and delivery of therapeutics based upon the relevant performance characteristics and pharmacokinetics.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- in BEN 201 and BEN 202, PHY 122, MAT 258, BIO 208 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    BEN 402 - Biomaterials and the Cellular Interface


    The course is focused on the application of biomedical engineering principles to the design, testing, and use of biomaterials.  The critical properties of materials such as those used for fabrication of biocompatible implanted devices, surgical materials and diagnostic tests will be examined.  The course will address the contribution of cell-surface interactions, tissue compatibility, physical stability, and other parameters to the identification of design constraints.

    Prerequisites: A C- or better in BEN 201 and BEN 202 and BMB 280, CHY 251 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BEN 403 - Instrumentation in Biomedical Engineering


    A range of widely used clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic instrumentation is presented.  Students are made aware of emerging tools and methods.  Theory, application, design, hardware and software components and limitations of a number of laboratory and clinical instruments are presented.  Students develop the skills necessary to design and automate their own instruments and methods using relevant software.  Key principles are further elucidated and, where appropriate, demonstrated during a weekly recitation.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in BEN 201 and BEN 202, STS 332, ECE 209 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    BEN 477 - Elements of Biomedical Engineering Design


    Introduction to the economic and regulatory aspects of biomedical engineering product design.   Covers elements of needs research and marketing.  Protection of intellectual property is also addressed, along with medical device testing, regulation, and finance.

    General Education Requirements: Together with BEN 111, BEN 493, & BEN 479, this course satisfies the General Education Ethics requirement.

    Prerequisites:  Senior standing, or permission

    Corequisites: BEN 478

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    BEN 478 - Biomedical Engineering Design I


    Application of engineering principles and design strategies to the solution of problems relevant to the biomedical community including: products, processes, devices, or techniques.  Emphasis on oral and written communications and working in small design groups.

    General Education Requirements: BEN 478 and BEN 479 must both be taken to satisfy the Capstone Experience.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in BEN 363 and BEN 403, or permission.

    Corequisites: BEN 477

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    BEN 479 - Biomedical Engineering Design II


    Application of professional practices and engineering principles to the solution of complex, open-ended, design challenges.  This can involve the design, prototyping, and optimization of products, processes, devices, or techniques relevant to the biomedical community.  Emphasis on oral and written communications and working in small design groups.

    General Education Requirements: BEN 478 and BEN 479 must both be taken to satisfy the Capstone.

    Together with BEN 111, BEN 493, & BEN 477, this course satisfies the Ethics requirement.

    Prerequisites: BEN 477 and BEN 478

    Course Typically Offered: Spring.

    Credits: 3

  
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    BEN 492 - Special Biomedical Engineering Design Projects


    A supervised design experience where students select and design components and systems for specified engineering projects.  Requires the student to demonstrate his or her ability to understand and apply scientific principles and engineering knowledge to the solution of real life problems.

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring & Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    BEN 493 - Biomedical Engineering Seminar


    Discussion of recent developments in the Biomedical Engineering field, in addition to related fields.

    General Education Requirements: Together with BEN 111, BEN 477, & BEN 479, this course satisfies the General Education Ethics requirement.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in Biomedical Engineering curriculum, or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 0-1
  
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    BEN 494 - Bioengineering Practice


    A cooperative work experience in an industrial, non-profit, government, medical or academic environment in Bioengineering. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 credit hours. (Offered by arrangement.)

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar

  
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    BEN 497 - Independent Study


    Individual, independent study of a specialized or standard course offered out of sequence, under supervision of an instructor.  Specific course requirements vary.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3-4
  
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    BEN 498 - Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering


    Course work in selected subjects relevant to the field of biomedical engineering, or related areas of science and technology not covered in other regular course offerings.  

    This course can be repeated for credit as long as it is a different topic and two sections on different topics can be taken concurrently.

    Prerequisites: Permission required.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

  
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    BEN 499 - Undergraduate Thesis


    Original investigation of a biomedical engineering problem.  A committee of at least three faculty members will supervise the thesis and its defense.  The topic must be chosen and approved by the committee prior to the senior year.  Maximum of 6 accumulated credit hours. (Offered by arrangement).

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6

Business Information Systems

  
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    BIS 105 - Excel Fundamentals for Business Analytics


    The course introduces students to work with data sets in excel worksheets, formulas, templates, charts, and common excel functions needed in any business context. Student cannot earn credit for both COS 213 and BIS 105. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    BIS 235 - Information Systems and Technology for Business


    Provides an overview of current and emerging technologies used in organizations today.  All business majors should understand the technological infrastructure underlying information systems of the firm including system components, databases, networking, telecommunications, e-commerce and distributed systems.  The course focuses on using information systems and technologies to enhance the competitive position of the firm, enabling managers to make better decisions and solve business problems.  A minimum grade of C- is required in this course.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIS 267 - Database Management


    Introduction to technical and managerial issues associated with databases.  Topics include structured query language (SQL) and database usage in decision making.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing and a Grade of C- or higher in BIS 235.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIS 345 - Business Analytics


    Overview of the process of business analysis. Data analytics have moved out of the academic world of statisticians to the practical world of technology. A variety of user-friendly technologies bring powerful analytical capabilities to end users. Three major areas that comprise analytics are reporting, visualization and prediction. This course uses the latest in technology to show the practice of data analytics in the real world. You will experience practical applications of analytics through guided exercises and case studies.

    Prerequisites: BIS 105, BIS 235 and STS 215 or STS 232

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIS 363 - Network Design and Applications


    Introduces the design, management and strategic use of information systems in networked environments. Topics include telecommunications, network architecture, security, distributed processing and the Internet.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better BIS 235

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIS 364 - Business Process Configuration


    Discusses advanced topics in business processing including concepts related to Enterprise System (ERP) principles, concepts, and techniques.  Grounded in an SAP (Systems, Applications & Products in Data Processing) architecture, this course counts toward the SAP Certificate of Completion.  Topics in the class include understanding system requirements and how business processes and business rules translate into system configuration.  Using SAP, students will learn the fundamentals of configuring an enterprise system from requirement gathering, through design, configuration, and testing.

    Prerequisites: BIS 235

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIS 468 - Electronic Business


    Electronic business has emerged as critical to the business environment and to maintain a competitive advantage in dynamic markets. Technology-enabled business trends have profoundly reshaped the business environment. The transformation of businesses to be technologically competitive in the 21st century include major software systems like customer relationship management, supply chain management, big data, cloud technologies, and the Internet of all things that enable businesses to improve their efficiencies as well as their ability to track and use analytics and understand customer needs in real time. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to understand the digital technologies necessary for productivity gains, customer knowledge and competitive advantage and represents the culmination and integration of prior knowledge gained in the business and MIS curriculum.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior standing, a grade of C- or better in BIS 267 and BIS 363 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIS 490 - Special Topics in Business Information Systems


    Study of various aspects of functional areas of business information systems. Topics vary depending on faculty and student interests. May be repeated for credit of the topics differ.

    Prerequisites: BIS 235 and junior standing 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer 

    Credits: 1-3

Canadian Studies

  
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    CAN 101 - Introduction to Canadian Studies


    Acquaints students with varied aspects of the Canadian experience: society, culture, history, native peoples, environment, education, technology, economy and diplomacy. Participating faculty include Canadian-American Center staff, visiting scholars from Canada and the United States, and faculty members from UM Colleges. Course includes an optional field trip to Canada.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CAN 401 - Readings in Canadian Studies


    An independent reading course examining issues and problems not studied in regular offerings. The course is arranged between the student and a Canadian Studies faculty member.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CAN 499 - Internship-Canadian Studies


    Provides students from Canadian Studies, International Affairs, French - or any major - the opportunity to integrate academic and professional experience through an internship with an external employer, that relates to the student’s course of studies and Northeastern Americas.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing with a 2.50 GPA or higher

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

Chemical Engineering

  
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    CHE 111 - Introduction to Chemical Engineering I


    An introduction to the professions of chemical engineering through a series of speakers, tours, presentations and projects.  The development of teaming and oral presentation skills are emphasized.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHE 477, CHE 479, & CHE 493, this course satisfies the General Education Ethics requirement.

    Prerequisites: First-year students only.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    CHE 112 - Introduction to Chemical Engineering II


    Introduction to the application of computers to solving chemical engineering problems.  Commercial and public domain computer software for equation solving and spread sheeting will be covered.  The application of these programs to chemical engineering problem solving will be introduced through a series of analysis and design projects.

    Prerequisites: MAT 126 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 200 - Fundamentals of Process Engineering


    Introduction to chemical engineering calculations. Application of material and energy balances to single and multi-unit processes with and without chemical reactions.

    Prerequisites: CHY 122, MAT 126 and PHY 121 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    CHE 350 - Statistical Process Control and Analysis


    The basics of statistics and statistical process control and systems optimization will be investigated.

    Prerequisites: MAT 127 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 352 - Process Control


    Process dynamics described by ordinary differential equations and by linearized approximations. Covers solution of system equations by the use of LaPlace transforms, concepts of feedback control, process dynamics and closed loop system analysis. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: MAT 258 or MAT 259 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 360 - Elements of Chemical Engineering I


    Introduction to rate operations, stage operations, and the principles of molecular and turbulent transport of mass, momentum, and energy including application of these principles to chemical engineering unit operations. Lec 4.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHE 200 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    CHE 361 - Chemical Engineering Laboratory I


    Applies the principles of chemical engineering unit operations and process control in the laboratory, using pilot scale equipment. An emphasis is placed on formal written and oral reports.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: CHE 352 and CHE 360 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 362 - Elements of Chemical Engineering II


    A continuation of CHE 360. Unit operations with emphasis on equilibrium stage operations involving interphase mass transfer - absorption, distillation, extraction leaching plus selected other topics such as drying, absorption and filtration. Lec 4.

    Prerequisites: CHE 360 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CHE 363 - Chemical Engineering Laboratory II


    Applies the principles of chemical engineering unit operations in the laboratory using pilot scale equipment.  An emphasis is placed upon formal written and oral reports.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: CHE 361, CHE 362, and CHE 368

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 368 - Kinetics and Reactor Design


    The analysis and design of chemical reactors.  The fundamental principles of chemical kinetics and of heat and mass transfer are applied to various types of chemical reactors.  (Spring and Summer.)

    Prerequisites: CHE 200 and CHE 386 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 385 - Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I


    Applications of the first and second laws of thermodynamics to the analysis of systems of interest to chemical engineers. Topics include state equations for both ideal and real gases, heat and energy relationships in chemical reactions, elementary phase equilibria, and simple heat and power cycles. Lec 3. (Spring.)

    Prerequisites: MAT 228 and a C- or better in CHE 200 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
 

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