Sep 27, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Communication & Journalism

  
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    CMJ 434 - Editorial and Opinion Writing


    Develops skills of persuasive and argumentative writing, with emphasis on disciplined logic, knowledge of subject and alternate points of view.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Artistic and Creative Expression Requirement.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CMJ 136

    Course Typically Offered: Not regularly offered.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 435 - Feature Writing


    Develops style and proficiency in writing non-fiction newspaper and magazine articles.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CMJ 136

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 450 - Communication and Technology


    Examines and analyzes the characteristics of and influences on human communication mediated by technology such as computer networks, video teleconferencing.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 466 - SL: Narrative, Performance, and Social Change


    The course offers a study of narratives and their performances as particular communication approaches to reflecting, engaging with, and transforming culture, identities, and communities. Considers forms and functions of narrative and performing narratives in variety of communication contexts.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: 3 credits of CMJ courses.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 483 - Capstone Seminar in Media Studies


    A seminar that draws upon and integrates formal components of students’ undergraduate experience.  Emphasis on the work of media professionals and on applications of media research and analysis in various contexts.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Media Studies Majors.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 484 - Investigative Journalism


    Develops professional and analytical skills in investigative journalistic reporting and writing for publication in various media formats, with an emphasis on open records and meetings, research for documentation, ethical responsibilities of investigative reporters, and in-depth presentation of individual projects.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CMJ 136

    Course Typically Offered: Not regularly offered.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 485 - Capstone Seminar in Communication


    Designed to draw upon and integrate formal components of students’ undergraduate experiences, with particular focus on issues of ethics, power, and communication in professional and individual contexts.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Communication major with senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 489 - Seminar in Media Ethics and Issues


    An advanced level course requiring extensive reading, discussion and research on the mass media and ethics, politics, economics and society.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Capstone

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CMJ 136 or permission, Junior or Senior Journalism Majors

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 492 - Directed Independent Study


    For the advanced student desiring to study a particular problem under the guidance of a member of the staff. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

    Prerequisites: Permission of Department Chair.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    CMJ 493 - Advanced Topics in Communication


    Advanced topics not regularly covered in other Communication courses.  Content varies to suit current needs.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:  3 credits of completed CMJ coursework

    Course Typically Offered: Variable.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMJ 495 - Internship


    Approved work experience for departmental majors in the application of communication to practical, theoretical or research problems in any public service agency, business, or other setting approved by the department. Requirements include an initial written application showing the projected experience and its relevance to communication, conferences with faculty supervisor, periodic logs or summaries, plus a final written report. May be repeated up to 6 hours.

    Prerequisites: Permission of Department Chair.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

Computer Science

  
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    COS 100 - Success in Computer Science


    Orientation to college, particularly for those majoring in computer science.  Introduction to the campus, resources available to students, and to the UMaine academic community.  Introduction to the School of Computing and Information Science (SCIS), including the people, physical and computational facilities, and available resources for success.  Introduction to computer science as a major, field, and a future career.  Introduction to majoring in computer science, including techniques and strategies for success, both in general and in the major.    Introduction to the College of Liberal Arts (CLAS), its characteristics, values, people, and academic community.

    Prerequisites: First year students with declared COS major.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    COS 103 - Introduction to Spreadsheets


    Topics include design and use of spreadsheets to solve problems using formulas, charts and data functions.  Credit does not count towards the COS major. This course assumes practical skills with the Windows operating system.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1
  
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    COS 120 - Introduction to Programming I


    Topics include the development of programming skills in the novice with instruction in a sample programming language. A laboratory/recitation session is included. Credit does not count towards the computer science major. This course assumes knowledge of the Windows operating system, basic word processing, and file and folder management.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 125 - Introduction to Problem Solving Using Computer Programming


    An introduction to computer science through problem solving and computer programming. Topics include variable and operators, control logic, functions, strings, loops, input/output, and recursion.  Programming concepts covered by this course include modularity, abstraction, top-down design, specifications, documentation, debugging, and testing.  No prior programming experience is expected.  Required for majors.

    General Education Requirements: Quantiative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 122, or no grade record in MAT 122 and a passing score on Part 3 of the Math Placement Exam.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    COS 135 - Applied C Programming


    Studies the C programming language, introduces concepts in computer hardware and operating systems to support discussion of how a computer program is represented from the machine layer to the application layer.

    Prerequisites: COS 140 and either COS 120 or 125

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 140 - Foundations of Computer Science


    A rigorous, non-programming introduction to the field of computer science.  Several core areas of computer science are introduced, including digital logic, computer organization and architecture, operating systems, programming languages, and computer networks.  For each, particular solutions to fundamental problems in the area are studied in depth to expose the student to what the field is actually about how computer scientists think.  No programming is taught or required in the course.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 198 - Topics in Computer Science


    Introductory topics in computer science not regularly covered in other courses. Content varies to suit current needs. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    COS 211 - Principles of Data Processing


    Presents basic concepts in database management systems using a microcomputer database system and basic theory of database design. Students will construct systems in various application areas. Credit does not count toward the computer science major.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 213 - Advanced Excel Spreadsheet Design


    This course explores techniques in spreadsheet software as used to develop business-related applications.  Topics include formulas and functions, charting, data operations, pivot tables, goal seeking, what-if analysis, management of large workbooks, and macros.  The programming language VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) is introduced.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 220 - Introduction to C++ Programming


    Topics include programming techniques with a brief introduction to hardware concepts as they apply to software development. Students are assigned programs emphasizing numerical algorithms for implementation in the C++ language. Assumes knowledge of the Windows operating system, basic word processing, and file and folder management. Some prior experience in programming logic, macros, or scripting is recommended. 

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 221 - Data Structures in C++


    This course introduces object-oriented programming techniques and data structures in C++.  Topics include class design, dynamic memory management, lists, stacks, queues, trees. STL, algorithm efficiency, searching and sorting algorithms.

    Prerequisites: COS 220 or ECE 177.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 225 - Object-Oriented Design, Programming and Data Structures


    Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of object-oriented design and programming using a high-level object-oriented language. Focuses on the specification, design, and implementation of classes and the interactions between classes, inheritance, abstract classes, and polymorphism. Introduces fundamental data structures including stacks, queues, lists, and binary trees.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in COS 125

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 226 - Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms


    Introduction to the fundamental principles of data structures, including their use, specification, and implementation, as well as fundamental principles of algorithms related to data structures.  Data structures covered include lists, trees, graphs, and hash tables.  Also covers fundamentals of algorithm analysis and a basic introduction to NP-completeness.

    Prerequisites:  C or higher in COS 225.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 235 - Computer Architecture


    Examines the architecture and organization of the computer including digital logic, the CPU, busses, internal and external memory, computer number representation and computer instructions. Particular attention is paid to assembly and C languages as a mechanism for better understanding the architecture.

    Prerequisites: COS 135

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 250 - Discrete Structures


    Introduction to discrete structures used in various areas of computer science. Topics include logic, sets, relations, functions, cardinality, enumeration, and computability.

    Prerequisites: Grade C or in MAT 126,COS 125 or ECE major with a Grade C or higher in MAT 126 and in ECE 177

    Corequisites: COS 140

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    COS 301 - Programming Languages


    Introduction to the fundamental concepts of formal languages, as well as the evolution and characteristics of major programming languages.  Topics include finite-state automata, regular expressions, parsing, syntax and semantics, scope and binding, data types, and abstract data types.

    Prerequisites: COS 226 and COS 250

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 312 - An Introduction to Video Game Programming with the Unity Game Engine


    A high-level approach to game programming uses one of the game engines commonly employed by game-development companies. Among these is Unity, a game engine that can create standalone video games for PCs and Macs, as well as versions playable in a web-page environment. Built-in tools include character controllers, cameras, lights, shaders, a powerful physics engine, terrain editors, tree generators, and more. Many of these are scripts written in Javascript, C#, or Boo. While many of the exercises stress the scripting aspects of working with Unity, a student who is a beginning programmer can create significant game content using only the pre-packages assets that are a standard part of the Unity system.

    Prerequisites: COS 125

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 331 - Operating Systems


    Study of the structure of current computer operating systems. Topics include I/O management, memory management, multiprogramming, linking loaders, real and virtual systems, batch and time sharing.

    Prerequisites: COS 226 and COS 235 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 397 - Computer Science Capstone 1


    The first of a two-course sequence, designed to guide students in proposing the Capstone project in either an independent study, group project, or field experience format.  The focus is on the early stages of project work, including finding a suitable topic and project advisor, investigating related work, and writing a thorough project proposal.  The relevant skills are covered and practiced by studying a collection of classic and topical papers.

    General Education Requirements: Upon completion of the two course sequence (COS 397 & COS 497), satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience Requirements.

    Prerequisites: COS 420

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 412 - Advanced Game Programming with Unity


    Building on tools acquired in COS 312, this course’s only prerequisite, students explore an advanced topic of their own choosing as they build their full final game.  Possible topics include advanced Artificial Intelligence scripting, Navmesh, networked games, 3D character rigging and animation, use of the Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles, and much more.  With weekly in class presentations and bi-weekly written reports, students document their progress and communicate their new tools to the rest of the class.  The final game is presented to the public at the end of the semester Demo Day.  If this course was taken under as a topics course in COS 498, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: COS 312

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 415 - Computer Simulation and Modeling, from Development to Display


    The process of designing and using a computer model is examined in detail. The development of the model equations, numerical techniques for solving them, and basic graphical techniques for displaying the results of the calculations will be presented.

    Prerequisites: Familiarity with a programming language or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 417 - Spatial Interaction Design


    The objective of this course is to provide a hands-on experience of interaction design research practice focusing on interactive prototype construction. The principles and technologies of interaction design will be learned through adding expressive interactions to objects and spaces around us (spatial interactions). Interaction Design (IxD) discovers people’s needs, understands the context of use, frames product opportunities, and proposes useful, usable, and desirable (usually digital) products. Interaction designers often work with narrative to explore and refine desired behaviors and user experience.

    Prerequisites: COS 226 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 420 - Introduction to Software Engineering


    A broad view of software engineering which introduces a variety of software engineering techniques which can be applied to practical software projects. Topics include process models, human factors, software specification; software design, programming techniques and tools, and validation.

    Prerequisites: COS 226

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 430 - Introduction to Cybersecurity


    An overview of Cybersecurity as information security, policies, guidelines, and legal issues; the nature of network and computer attacks, system vulnerabilities and defense; implementation issues in Unix/Linux.  Projects include system setup, attack, and defense.

    Prerequisites: COS 235 and COS 331.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 435 - Information Privacy Engineering


    Overview of the current privacy (and security) regulations acrosstheworldand the associated privacy (and security) challenges, methodologiesand algorithmsfor applications ranging from Cyber-PhysicalSystems, the Internet of Things, Android/iOS applications, and machine learning models.

    Prerequisites: COS 420

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 440 - Computer Networks I


    Covers data and computer communications using ISO model. Discussion of physical media, communication protocols, and network architectures including wide area and local area networks. Includes examples of networks currently in use.

    Prerequisites: COS 331 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 451 - Automata, Computability, and Languages


    Fundamentals of formal languages and the mathematical theory of computation; finite-state automata, nondeterminism, regular expressions, and Kleene’s Theorem; context-free grammars, pushdown automata, the correspondence theorem and the pumping lemma; computability, Turing machines, and the halting problem.

    Prerequisites: COS 301

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 454 - Data Structures and Algorithms


    Covers advanced data structures and the algorithms associated with them as well as advanced methods of algorithm analysis, including time and space complexity classes and NP-completeness.

    Prerequisites: COS 226 and COS 250

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 460 - Interactive Computer Graphics


    Topics include graphic I/0 devices: plotter, CRT, and light pen; vector generation; transformation of two/and three-dimensional objects; clipping and windowing; hidden line removal; interrupt handling; interactive techniques; data structures for graphics; and various display algorithms.

    Prerequisites: COS 226 or equivalent and MAT 126 and junior standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 465 - Data Visualization


    Introduction to the goals, techniques, implementation, and evaluation of visual representations for large quantities of data.  Students work with a team to produce a novel visualization solution for a client with application domain data and goals.  COS 465 and COS 565 cannot both be taken for credit. COS 465 and COS 565 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: COS 226 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 470 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence


    Introduces the student to the field of artificial intelligence, including fundamental areas and concepts such as heuristic search, knowledge representation, automated reasoning and planning, deep learning, intelligent agents, and multiagent systems.  Experience in AI programming is provided by homework assignments and a semester project.

    Prerequisites: COS 226 or COS 221 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 480 - Database Management Systems


    Covers database management systems from the perspective of database designers and database application programmers.  Topics include Entity-Relationship modeling, relational databases, transactions and isolation, and Web-database applications.  Includes both individual programming assignments and semester-long group projects culminating in demonstrations of substantial database application.

    Prerequisites: COS 301 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 490 - Computers, Ethics and Society


    Consideration of human and social consequences of technological development and application of computers, ethical questions of computer use, professional ethics.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Ethics and Writing Intensive Requirements.

    Prerequisites: COS 226 and Junior Standing or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 497 - Computer Science Capstone 2


    The second of a two-course sequence, designed to guide students in completing the Capstone project in either an independent study, group project, or field experience format.  The focus is on the later stages of project work, including completing the programming tasks, evaluating the implemented systems, documenting all work in a project report, demonstrating the work in action, and making a public oral presentation.  The relevant skills are covered and practiced by studying a collection of classic and topical papers.

    General Education Requirements: Upon completion of the two course sequence (COS 397 & COS 497), satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience Requirements.

    Prerequisites: COS Majors with Senior standing, COS 397, and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    COS 498 - Topics in Computer Science


    Topics not regularly covered in other courses. Content varies to suit current needs. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: One semester of programming.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    COS 499 - Senior Project


    An undergraduate research project in computer science under the direction of an approved advisor. An individual or small group will work on the conception, design and implementation of a significant computer science project. A presentation, open to interested faculty, staff and students may be required at the completion of the project.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    HCI 395 - Human Computer Interaction Internship


    Experiential learning and opportunities to work on research projects is a key foundation to studying Human Computer Interaction. In collaboration with and with the permission of the professor, undergraduate students may engage in designated or independent project work on any number of research projects sponsored by faculty. Students must complete an Independent Study Proposal, negotiate the number of unites to be earned, complete a contract, and present a tangible deliverable. The Undergraduate Program Advisors signature is required for HCI undergraduate-level Independent Study courses.

    Through a substantial team project, students apply classroom knowledge in analysis and evaluation, implementation and design, and develop skills working in multidisciplinary teams. Students will work a qualified Lab, Department, or Company for university-based research or external clients to participate in an area of research, design, development and evaluation of assigned projects.

    Prerequisites: Departmental Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3


Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 114 - Survey of Criminal Justice


    This course is designed to provide an overview of the justice process and the criminal justice system in general. Concepts of crime, deviance and justice will be discussed. Individual rights in a democratic society will be explored, as will the legal definitions of various crimes.  The law enforcement, judicial, juvenile justice and corrections subsystems will also be explored, and a number of reform proposals presented.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CRJ 214 - Introduction to Criminology


    This course examines the causes, extent, and nature of crime in American society. Emphasis given to the measurement of crime, the social patterning of criminal behavior, theories of criminal behavior, and the dynamics of types of crime.

    Prerequisites: CRJ 114 or SOC 101 

    Course Typically Offered: Variable 

    Credits: 3
  
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    CRJ 220 - Corrections


    This course will introduce students to the goals, purpose, and history of the corrections system within the United States.  Students will learn how the American correctional system became a hallmark for the punishment and management of offenders with one of the highest incarceration rates in the world.  Students will also examine current issues that professionals in the field of corrections encounter, such as the management of inmates with mental health needs.  Examples of topics covered in this class include the establishment of community corrections, the societal impact of mass imprisonment, and the management of inmates with special needs.

    Prerequisites: CRJ 114

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CRJ 301 - Gender and Crime


    This course will focus on the four major roles of women in  the criminal justice system-women as criminal justice professionals/practitioners.  Each of these roles will be examined against the backdrop of the socialization of gender within our culture.

    Prerequisites: CJR 114, CRJ 214 and SOC 101

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Alternating years

    Credits: 3
  
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    CRJ 302 - Race and Crime


    This course examines race, crime, and criminal justice in the United States.  Topics will include racial/ethnic differences in criminal behavior, in victimization, and in criminal justice involvement.  A major focus of the course will concern the issue of possible racial bias in the operation of the criminal justice system and the criminal justice system’s disparate impact on people of color.

    Prerequisites: SOC 101 and CRJ 114 and CRJ 214

    Course Typically Offered: Alternating years

    Credits: 3
  
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    CRJ 321 - Criminal Courts


    This course examines the operation of the criminal courts in the United States.  Topics will include the purpose and structure of the criminal courts; the courtroom workgroups and the roles played by its criminal actors; and the operation of the criminal courts from pretrial processes through the appellate process. A major focus of the course will concern the extent to which the criminal courts achieve their goal of impartial treatment of suspects and defendants without bias or prejudice based on these persons’ race, ethnicity, or other personal factors.

    Prerequisites: CRJ 114 and CRJ 214

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    CRJ 322 - Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure


    This course examines criminal law and criminal procedures in the United States. Topics will include the elements of criminal law; the elements of crimes against the person, crimes against property, and crimes against the public; legal defenses to charges of criminal misconduct; and the rules of criminal procedure from search and arrest through trial and sentencing.

    Prerequisites: CRJ 114 and CRJ 214

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate years

    Credits: 3

Critical Language

  
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    VOX 100 - Beginning Spoken Arabic I


    Beginning Arabic language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers in the target language, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement. 

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 101 - Beginning Spoken Chinese I


    Beginning Chinese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers in the target language, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 105 - Beginning Spoken Irish Gaelic I


    Beginning Irish Gaelic language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers in the target language, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 106 - Beginning Spoken Italian I


    Beginning Italian language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers in the target language, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement. 

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 107 - Beginning Spoken Japanese I


    Beginning Japanese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers in the target language, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 108 - Beginning Spoken Korean I


    Beginning Korean language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers in the target language, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 109 - Beginning Spoken Portuguese I


    Beginning Portuguese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers in the target language, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 110 - Beginning Spoken Russian I


    Beginning Russian language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers in the target language, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 130 - Beginning Spoken Arabic II


    Beginning Arabic language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 100 and Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 131 - Beginning Spoken Chinese II


    Beginning Chinese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 101 and Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 135 - Beginning Spoken Irish Gaelic II


    Beginning Irish Gaelic language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 105 and Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 136 - Beginning Spoken Italian II


    Beginning Italian language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 106 and Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 137 - Beginning Spoken Japanese II


    Beginning Japanese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 107 and Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 138 - Beginning Spoken Korean II


    Beginning Korean language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 108 and Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 139 - Beginning Spoken Portuguese II


     

    Beginning Portuguese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 109 and Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

  
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    VOX 140 - Beginning Spoken Russian II


    Beginning Russian language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class is taught by native speakers, and includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 110 and Permission of Coordinator of Critical Language Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 160 - Beginning Spoken Arabic III


    Beginning Arabic language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class focuses on oral communication and is taught by a native speaker.  Includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 130 or equivalent and permission of Critical Languages Coordinator

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 161 - Beginning Spoken Chinese III


    Beginning Chinese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class focuses on oral communication and is taught by a native speaker.  Includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 131

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 167 - Beginning Spoken Japanese III


    Beginning Japanese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class focuses on oral communication and is taught by a native speaker.  Includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 137

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 190 - Critical Languages (Other)


    Specific topics determined by current interests of students and staff.  May be repeated for credit if different topic is taken.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission of Critical Languages Coordinator.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 207 - Intermediate Spoken Japanese I


    Intermediate Japanese language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class focuses on oral communication and is taught by a native speaker.  Includes a high degree of cultural engagement. 

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 137 and Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 210 - Intermediate Spoken Russian I


    Intermediate Russian language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation.  Class focuses on oral communication and is taught by a native speaker.  Includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 140 and permission of Critical Languages Coordinator.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 240 - Intermediate Spoken Russian II


    Intermediate Russian language study using a combination of self-instruction and recitation. Class focuses on oral communication and it taught by a native speaker.  Includes a high degree of cultural engagement.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: VOX 210 and Permission

    Credits: 3
  
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    VOX 290 - Intermediate Critical Languages (Other)


    Specific languages determined by current interests of students and staff.  May be repeated for credit if taking a higher level of the same language or a different language.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

Dance

  
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    DAN 101 - Beginner Modern Dance I


    Fundamental concepts and practice of modern dance technique: body alignment, stretch/strengthening, movement vocabulary, body coordination, musicality and spatial awareness. For the general student at the beginning dance level.  May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 102 - Beginner Ballet I


    An introduction to classical ballet dance training. Traditional exercises at the barre and on center floor emphasize body placement, flow of energy, and the creation of expressive movement in space. For the performing artist or general student. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 103 - Beginner Jazz I


    Fundamentals of jazz dance technique with emphasis on body alignment, coordination and movement vocabulary. Preparation for expressive movement in relation to modern jazz music. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 105 - Beginner Tap


    Teaches the fundamentals of Rhythm tap and Broadway Styles technique with emphasis on body alignment, flexibility, strength, rhythm, coordination and movement vocabulary. Expressive movement is encouraged. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 112 - Production/Rehearsal


    Dance production and performance with emphasis on repertory, costuming, lighting in relation to choreography, staging, publicity and rehearsal. May be repeated with permission.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Audition or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1

  
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    DAN 121 - Beginner Modern Dance II


    Builds upon the fundamental concepts and practice of modern dance technique focusing on body alignment, stretch, strengthening, movement vocabulary, coordination, musicality and spatial awareness. Further emphasis on longer dance phrases and musicality. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative

    Prerequisites: DAN 101 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 122 - Beginner Ballet II


    Builds upon the fundamentals of classical ballet technique with emphasis on alignment, flexibility, strength, coordination and movement vocabulary. Expressive movement, the execution of ballet ‘line’, and performance of longer dance phrases will be encouraged. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative

    Prerequisites: DAN 102 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 123 - Beginner Jazz II


    Builds upon the fundamentals of lyrical jazz technique and contemporary jazz styles with emphasis on alignment, coordination, and movement vocabulary. Expressive movement in relation to modern jazz music and performance of longer dance phrases will be encouraged. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: DAN 103 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 130 - Ballroom and World Dance Forms


    From swing to salsa and waltz to tango, basic social and Latin dance, with emphasis on alignment, coordination, and movement vocabulary. Additional exposure to Afro-Caribbean roots of today’s dance forms. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Artistic and Creative Expression Requirement.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 201 - Intermediate Modern Dance


    Continuation of DAN 121. Emphasis on solving more complex movement problems. Provides an enhanced movement vocabulary and further principles of body alignment, stretch/strengthening and musicality and expressiveness. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: DAN 121 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2-3
  
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    DAN 202 - Intermediate Ballet


    A detailed study of ballet form for the student with some previous training. Students master the execution of exercises and steps with speed, clarity and grace in order to achieve a fuller kinesthetic awareness. Can be used as a base for professional training or general artistic enrichment. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: DAN 122 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2-3
  
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    DAN 205 - Intermediate Tap


    Expands upon the fundamentals of Rhythm Tap and Broadway Styles technique. Complex rhythmic patterns, breaks, and longer combinations are encouraged. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: DAN 105 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 250 - Dance Composition I


    Study of the principles and elements of choreography. Provides guided practice in the construction of movement phrases, and studies for solo and group dances. Includes an informal studio presentation of student pieces.

    Prerequisites: Prior dance experience or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    DAN 297 - Introductory Topics in Dance


    Provides an opportunity for introductory level exploration within a particular dance form, tradition or innovation not covered within the existing course offerings. Specific topics will vary semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    DAN 397 - Intermediate Topics in Dance


    Provides an opportunity for intermediate level exploration within a particular dance form, tradition or innovation not covered within the existing course offerings. Specific topics will vary semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 2

Disability Studies

  
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    DIS 300 - Disability: Interaction of Human Diversity and Global Environment


    Designed to introduce the student to disability as an element of human diversity that has a significant reciprocal relationship with the environment. We begin by discussing prevalence and incidence of disability across the globe, examine the historical changes in concepts of disability over time, and then study disability as a human phenomenon which both emerges from and influences biological, economic, physical, social, political, spiritual, cultural, technological and virtual environments.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    DIS 400 - Disability as Diversity I


    Examines disability history, theory and current thinking in the field of disability studies. Through interdisciplinary interchange and experiential learning, students will explore the lived experience of people with disabilities and their families across the lifespan, examine and debate ethical dilemmas related to disability, and analyze implicit disability related values reflected in diverse academic and professional fields. Students will apply their learning to their own disciplines.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Ethics

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    DIS 450 - Disability: Population-Environment Diversity


    Consistent with contemporary literature and research in the interdisciplinary field of disability studies, students will examine and analyze disability as an interactive disjuncture between the environment, the human body and population groups.  Students will analyze how environments shape and are shaped by disability populations and will focus on realigning bodies, populations and environments to advance full participation, reduce personal and environmental harm reductions, and preserve just and safe environments.  Included will be natural, virtual, service, economic, social, policy, and community environments across the globe.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    DIS 480 - Independent Project in Disability Studies


    Individual work on a topic or problem selected by the student. Primarily for students in the Interdisciplinary Concentration in Disability Studies.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6

Earth Sciences

  
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    ERS 101 - Introduction to Geology


    A study of earth materials and processes, including their impact on humans.  Topics include mineralogy, formation of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, geologic time, weathering and soil formation, glaciation, deserts and desertification, coastlines, earthquakes and seismology, and evolution of mountain belts and plate tectonics.  Laboratory work includes the study of rocks, minerals, topographic maps and aerial photographs in preparation for a one-day weekend field trip to Acadia National Park.  

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    ERS 102 - Environmental Geology


    Environmental Geology explores the interaction of humans with the Earth’s systems. The course begins with discussions of earth materials and human population dynamics. The science underlying geologic hazards (earthquakes, floods, landslides, etc.) is described and the interaction between geologic hazards and humans is explored. Human impacts on earth systems are identified and evaluated with a focus on pollution and climate change. Sources of energy used by humans and the associated environmental consequences of different energy sources are discussed. May include a one day field trip.

    General Education Requirements:  Laboratory in the Basic or Applied Sciences and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 4
 

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