Jun 29, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Engineering Communication Project

  
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    ECP 341 - Technical Writing for Mechanical Engineers I


    This course offers guided practice and instruction in writing informal and formal lab reports for MEE 341.  The course focuses on applying technical writing strategies such as audience analyses, document organization and design, graphics design, stylistic choices, formatting practices, and self-editing skills.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Corequisites: MEE 341 or special permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    ECP 342 - Technical Writing Workshop for Electrical Networks II


    Consists of supervised workshops and exercises designed to assist students in preparing the technical documents required in ECE 342, Electronics I. Students will review and revise their work, as well as complete exercises that will emphasize the technical writing skills they will need in the classroom and on the job.  

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Requirement when taken with ECE 342.

    Corequisites: ECE 342

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    ECP 403 - Technical Writing Workshop for Electrical and Computer Engineering Design Project


    Consists of supervised workshops and exercises designed to assist students in preparing the technical documents required in ECE 403, Electrical and Computer Engineering Design Project.  Students will review and revise their work, as well as complete exercises that will emphasize the technical writing skills they will need in the classroom and on the job.

    Corequisites: ECE 403

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    ECP 411 - Civil Engineering Technical Writing III


    Technical writing laboratory for civil engineering seniors that culminates in the capstone report.  The topics covered include correspondence, report writing, document design and management, and professional writing style.  Most assignments are prepared and submitted by project teams, which meet frequently with the instructor.  Reports are also submitted to CIE 411.

    General Education Requirements: Together with ECP 225 and ECP 413, this course satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive requirement.

    Corequisites: CIE 411

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    ECP 413 - Civil Engineering Technical Writing II


    Technical writing course for civil engineers with focus on preparing persuasive professional documents and a significant proposal. Reports are also submitted to CIE 413. Lec 1.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive when taken with CIE 413.

    Prerequisites: Civil Engineering major or permission.

    Corequisites: CIE 413

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    ECP 487 - Technical Writing for Mechanical Engineers II


    This course offers instruction in writing documents related to mechanical engineering senior design projects. Instruction focuses on ethics in professional engineering, writing new project proposals, creating and maintaining a useful project website; and planning, organizing and writing of a design progress report.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ECP 341

    Corequisites:  MEE 487 unless otherwise approved by the instructor and the Department of Mechanical Engineering

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    ECP 488 - Technical Writing for Mechanical Engineers III


    This course offers guided practice and instruction in group writing strategies, performing oral presentations, creating technical posters, writing professional job applications materials, and writing formal design completion records for the MEE 488 capstone project. The course emphasizes small group communication and coordination and technical writing strategies, such as reader-centered document organization and formatting, page and graphics design, and stylistic choices.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Corequisites: MEE 488 or special permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 1

English

  
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    ENG 100 - College Composition Stretch, Part I


    This course provides intense practice with habits of reading, writing, thinking, and revising essential to postsecondary academic work.  Designed for students who want to create a strong foundation for themselves in academic reading and writing.  Available only during fall semester.  Students who complete ENG 100 move on to ENG 106 during the spring semester.  Students will not earn credit or grades for completing both ENG 101 and either course in the College Composition Stretch Sequence, ENG 100 and ENG 106.

     

    General Education Requirements: Students must complete both ENG 100 and ENG 106 with a minimum grade of C or better in each course to satisfy the General Education Writing Intensive requirement.  Neither course taken alone will satisfy this requirement.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
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    ENG 101 - College Composition


    Students practice the ways in which writing serves to expand, clarify, and order experience and knowledge, with particular attention to persuasive writing. Satisfactory completion of the course depends upon quality of weekly writing assignments as well as demonstration of proficiency in college-level writing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 106 - College Composition Stretch, Part II


    This course provides intense practice with habits of reading, writing, thinking, and revising essential to post secondary academic work.  Designed for students who want to create a strong foundation for themselves in academic reading and writing.  Available only during the spring semester.  Students will not earn credit or grades for completing both ENG 101 and either course in the College Composition Stretch Sequence, ENG 100 and ENG 106.

     

    General Education Requirements: Students must complete both ENG 100 and ENG 106 with a minimum grade of C or better in each course to satisfy the General Education Writing Intensive requirement.  Neither course taken alone will satisfy this requirement.

    Prerequisites: C or better in ENG 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    ENG 129 - Topics in English


    Offers small-group discussions of literature focusing on a common theme. Each division takes up a different theme, such as utopianism, the quest myth, growing up in America and the like. Students can expect to read texts closely and write regularly about them. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Open to first-year students only. May be taken before or after ENG 101 or concurrently with permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 131 - The Nature of Story


    Explores the fundamental activity of why and how we create, tell and read/listen to stories. Readings may include selections from folk tale and myth, saga and epic, drama and novel, film and song, poetry and essay–from the ancient world to the modern, from the western cultural tradition and from a variety of other cultures.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 170 - Foundations of Literary Analysis


    An introduction to the close reading of literature. Students write frequently, exploring how conventions of genre, form, and style work in literature. Required of English majors.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 is strongly recommended.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 201 - Strategies for Writing Across Contexts


    Builds upon ENG 101’s introduction to post secondary writing by developing students’ facility with a range of strategies for tailoring rhetorical style and tone to a range of academic, transactional, and public genres

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Corequisites: Sophomore Standing and ENG 101.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 205 - An Introduction to Creative Writing


    Offers students experience in writing in three major forms: autobiographical narrative, fiction, and poetry.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 is strongly recommended.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 206 - Descriptive and Narrative Writing


    Special emphasis on the informal, autobiographical essay.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 222 - Reading Poems


    Focuses on helping students develop critical skills particularly suited to the interpretation and analysis of poetry. Readings will include poems from different eras in both traditional and innovative forms. May cover a range of poetic practices and a variety of media: including, for example, poetry readings, little magazines and presses, digital texts, and poetic movements.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Artistic and Creative Expression and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 229 - Topics in Literature


    Subject matter varies with faculty interest.  Previous topics have included: scandalous women, detective fiction, vampires in literature, dark humor in literature, and literature of the Vietnam War.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 235 - Literature and the Modern World


    An examination of the modern sensibility as it has manifested itself in 20th century literature. Some attention also to the history, music, visual arts, social thought, and science of the contemporary epoch.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Artistic and Creative Expression and Ethics

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 236 - Intro to Canadian Literature


    A survey of Canadian literature from 1850 to the present. Interpretation and analysis of the poetry and prose of major literary figures. Some examination of the impact of British and American models upon the tradition of Canadian literature.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, Artistic and Creative Expression and Ethics

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 238 - Nature and Literature


    Looks at the many different ways people have looked at nature and examines the philosophies and values which inform humans’ interactions with their environment. Authors will be drawn from traditional literary figures, American nature writers, environmentalists and especially, authors from Maine. Assignment may include field experience.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 243 - Topics in Multicultural Literature


    Topics will vary, including such titles as Ethnicity and Race in American Literature; Caribbean Literature; Third World Literature; and other topics in African, Asian, Francophone, Native American, Chicano and ethnic literatures in the English language.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Ethics

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 244 - Writers of Maine


    An exploration of the varied nature of the Maine experience as exemplified by writers of fiction, poetry, essays, and other creative genres.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Artistic and Creative Expression and Ethics

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English, or permission of instructor.

     

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    ENG 245 - American Short Fiction


    A study of genre, form, and theme in representative works of American short fiction from Irving to the present.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Artistic and Creative Expression and Ethics

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 246 - American Women’s Literature


    A survey of the main traditions and writers in American women’s literature from the origins to the present.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Ethics

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 249 - American Sports Literature and Film


    Uses readings in fiction, poetry, drama, essays and films to explore social, humanistic, ethical and aesthetic issues in sports and its literature. Examines ways writers capture physical action and the role of sports in various genres and media.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 253 - Shakespeare: Selected Plays


    A study of ten to twelve plays, selected to represent the range of Shakespeare’s achievement as a playwright. Recommended for non-majors. Not open to students who have taken ENG 453.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Artistic and Creative Expression and Ethics

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 256 - British Women’s Literature


    A survey of British women writers and their traditions from the origins to the present.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 271 - The Act of Interpretation


    An introduction to critical theory. Study of individual critics or schools of literary theory. Application of these interpretative strategies to literary texts.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 170.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 280 - Introduction to Film


    A survey of the history of motion pictures and an exploration of the rhetoric of film, designed to give students with no prior film study an integrated approach to understanding the moving image and how it functions.

    General Education Requirements: Social Context and Institutions and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: 3 hours of English.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 301 - Seminar in Writing Studies


    A writing-intensive seminar that combines substantial reflective practice with an introduction to research and scholarship in literacy and writing studies.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 201, ENG 315, or ENG 395.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 307 - Writing Fiction


    The writing of fiction, for students of demonstrated ability. Submission of writing sample.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 206 and approval of a portfolio by instructor

    .

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    ENG 308 - Writing Poetry


    A course in the writing of poetry, for students of demonstrated ability.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Requirement.

    Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 206 or permission of instructor. Submission of writing sample.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 309 - Writing Creative Nonfiction


    An intermediate course in such forms of creative nonfiction as memoir, travel literature, autobiography and personal essays.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 201 or ENG 205 or ENG 206 or ENG 315 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 315 - Research Writing in the Disciplines


    Builds on ENG 101 by preparing students for writing-intensive coursework and for senior capstone projects. This course focuses on similarities and differences among the types of peer-reviewed academic research articles that researchers and scholars use to advance knowledge in their fields. Class projects will develop familiarity with and contribute to students’ own academic research writing in their chosen field of study.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and a declared major.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 317 - Business and Technical Writing


    Supervised practice in the writing of business and technical reports, professional correspondence, and related materials.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent and junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 320 - Technical Communication for Engineering


    Technical Communication for Engineering provides theory and extended practice in the major categories of communication used by engineers in professional and academic settings. Students will learn the principles of ethically communicating technical concepts to audiences with varying levels of technical background. Students will produce genres commonly used by engineers, such as memos, analytical reports, and presentations.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Social Context and Institutions

    Prerequisites: MEE or CIE Majors, ENG 101 or equivalent and Sophomore Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 336 - Canadian Literature


    An intensive study of a major Canadian writer or small group of Canadian writers, or an examination of a major theme in Canadian literature. Specific topic varies from semester to semester. This reading-intensive course is designed to teach students about Canadian literature while giving them the opportunity to practice their reading and research skills in order to better prepare them for work in advanced seminars.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 341 - Colonial and Early National American Literature


    The literatures of colonial America began almost immediately after contact between Europeans and Native Americans in the fifteenth century, disseminated in multiple languages across Europe. These earliest writings were advertisements for empire: tales of adventure, catalogues of wonders, justifications and warnings. By the seventeenth century, new immigrants and American-born settlers were creating a local literature for local consumption, including the great devotional works of the New England Puritans and the first examples of that long-lived American genre, the captivity narrative. This colonial period culminated in the eighteenth century’s American Enlightenment, which gave rise to the Revolution, and was soon followed by the first stirrings of literary nationalism in the early republic. Encompassing three hundred years of history and an international range of authors, this introductory course may include works translated into English and taking such representative forms as the memoir, travel narrative, sermon, and political tract, as well as the more expected literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama. A reading-intensive course, it is designed to teach students about a crucial epoch in world history and American literature while creating an opportunity for students to practice reading and research skills in order to better prepare them for work in advances seminars.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity or International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 342 - Native American Literature


    Surveys literature by Native American authors from a wide range of tribal backgrounds and culture areas. Considers the development of written traditions over time in relation to oral genres, traditional themes and story forms, and situates writing by Native American people in the context of historical and socio-political events and trends in Turtle Island (North America). Provides the opportunity to reconsider stories of colonization and the Anglo-American culture/nation in the light of indigenous perspectives and experience. This reading-intensive course is designed to teach you about the history of Native American writing in English, while giving you the opportunity to practice your reading and research skills in order to prepare you for work in advanced seminars.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 343 - Nineteenth-Century American Literature


    An introduction to American literature and culture of the nineteenth century, a period of unprecedented violence, vision, and change encompassing some of the most storied names in poetry and prose. Because the historical events and social turmoil of the century is so crucial for an understanding of its greatest authors, the course may include writers and thinkers whose primary significance is not literary-men and women who witnessed or acted in the great events of the age. This reading-intensive course is designed to teach students about a rich, exciting epoch in literary history while giving them the opportunity to practice their reading and research skills in order to better prepare them for work in advanced seminars.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 351 - Medieval English Literature


    An introduction to Medieval Literature which involves reading the wild, beautiful, idiosyncratic, and foreign yet strangely familiar works of Chaucer and his English contemporaries. The class will focus on understanding the nature of the medieval world and its expression in the literature of the time, and on developing reading skill in Middle English. This reading-intensive course is designed to teach students about a crucial epoch in literary and linguistic history while giving them the opportunity to practice their reading and research skills in order to better prepare them for work in advanced seminars. For more details see course descriptions on the English Department website.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 353 - Shakespeare and the English Renaissance


    Renaissance suggests a rebirth of classical models, but this period (late 16th and early 17th centuries) is also one of startling innovation. The literature of Shakespeare and his contemporaries can be wildly comic and tragic, lyrical and grotesque, epic and domestic, rewriting the medieval and anticipating the modern worlds. Emphasis may vary among genres (drama, lyric, narrative poetry), theme (romance, revenge, rebellion, reverence), and authors (Shakespeare, Spenser, Marlowe, Donne, Milton for example). This reading intensive course introduces representative texts from a crucial period in literary history, and it provides students the opportunity to practice reading and research skills in preparation for work in advanced seminars.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 355 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature


    From sentiment to sadism, astounding change ignited the Restoration and Eighteenth Century, making this period a watershed that marks the transition from Renaissance to Modern. This reading-intensive class will consider literature against the background of this historical change, inheritance, and influence. Works by Pope, Behn, Cavendish, Finch, Congreve, Dryden, Swift, Defoe, Richardson, Johnson, and Radcliffe, among others. The focus on reading and research skills will prepare students for work in advance seminars.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 357 - Nineteenth-Century British Literature


    This reading intensive course introduces Nineteenth-century British literature in the context of larger political, technological, cultural, and social changes: The expanding publishing market, the growing influence of a literate middle-class, industrialization, urbanization, global capitalism and modern warfare, Britain’s imperial power. Because of the sheer variety of works and genres, emphasis will vary from instructor to instructor, but along with well-known writers like Wordsworth, Austen, or Dickens, students will be introduced to lesser-known authors, popular and influential in their day but too often forgotten since. This course provides students with the opportunity to practice reading and research skills and prepares students for work in advanced seminars. For more details see Course Descriptions on the English Department website.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 361 - Modernism


    An introduction to modernism, the revolution in literature and culture that took place during the end of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century. Because modernism was an international movement expressed in multiple genres, this introductory course may include writers and artists from around the world working in poetry, prose, drama, and film. This reading-intensive course is designed to teach students about a crucial period in literary history while giving them the opportunity to practice their reading and research skills in order to better prepare them for work in advanced seminars.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 363 - Literature of the Postmodern Period


    An introduction to literature of the postmodern period, roughly defined as 1945-1989. To call the historical-literary period and writing styles that emerged after WWII “postmodern” can spark a lively argument. But, whatever your position, the fact remains that during this extraordinary times poets, playwrights, and novelists responded to a world changed by WWII in intelligent and challenging ways. Continuing modernist-period fluidity across national borders as well as genres, this reading-intensive course may include writers from around the world working in poetry, prose, and drama. It is designed to teach students about a crucial period in recent literary history while giving them the opportunity to practice their reading and research skills in order to better prepare them for work in advanced seminars. For more details, see course descriptions on the English Department website.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 364 - Contemporary Literature


    An introduction to literature after 1989 and up to the present. Studying the living tradition can be incredibly exciting. From writers working in our moment we can gain a unique perspective on our world, which may help us to develop a nuanced reading of the broader culture we both consume and participate in. Because contemporary literature often defies easy genre distinctions, and sometimes even the conventional idea of the book, this course may include multiple genres and cross-genre forms, and a variety of media, from sound files to digital literature. This reading-intensive course is designed to teach students about literature emerging in our time while giving them the opportunity to practice their reading and research skills in order to better prepare them for work in advanced seminars.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 371 - Readings in Literary Theory and Criticism


    This reading-intensive course is designed to acquaint students with a wider range of theoretical and critical texts, concepts, and perspectives than can typically be covered in core requirement classes such as English 170 and 271 (both of which are strongly recommended). Emphasis will be given to theories of signification (semiotics), representation (mimesis), and interpretation (hermeneutics) that have informed the practice of literary analysis from antiquity to the present day. The course will also provide students with the opportunity to practice their reading and research skills in order to better prepare them for work in advances seminars such as English 470: Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 381 - Themes in Literature


    When we approach study of literature thematically, surprising connections can emerge.  In this reading-intensive course, we will trace a single, defined theme through multiple literary works. This journey through a particular theme is a delightful way for you to practice your reading and research skills in preparation for advanced seminars. 

    This course can be taken twice for credit provided that the theme covered is different for a maximum of six credits earned. 

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
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    ENG 382 - Major Genres in Historical Perspective


    Tragedy, comedy, lyric, novel, play or film: these are just a few of the divisions, called “genres” that we use to distinguish one kind of literary art from another. Continuing and deepening the work begun in 170 and/or 222, Major Genres in Historical Perspectives is a reading-intensive course on the thematic and technical developments of one specific genre within a broader cultural and historical framework. This theoretical approach to genre studies will allow students to spend more time reading in a genre they love, while giving them the opportunity to practice their research skills in preparation for work in advanced seminars. May be taken more than once for credit, provided the genre covered is different.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: 6 credits beyond ENG 101 (ENG 170 and ENG 222 recommended) or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 395 - English Internship


    An advanced course in writing and collaborative learning. Students first experience collaborative work in essay writing, critical reading of peers’ essays, and rigorous practice in written and oral criticism. They participate in supervised tutoring in the English Department’s writing center.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent and at least one other writing intensive course, a recommendation from a UM faculty member, submission of writing sample and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 402 - Topics in Writing and Research


    A seminar concentrating on a specific topic or concern in undergraduate research and writing.  This course emphasizes theoretical and practical approaches to research by engaging participants in a sustained research project.  May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: English Majors with Junior or Senior standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 405 - Topics in Creative Writing


    A senior level course designed to provide students with an opportunity to work intensively in a specifically defined genre, form, or methods of creative writing.  May also address the broader issues of production and publication.  Sample topics: graphic novel, hypertext, mixed-media, electronic writing, translation, traditional poetic forms, the epic, publication, book-making, magazine editing, the serial poem, the long poem, collaboration. ENG 405 and/or ENG 406 may be taken for credit up to a total of 6 credit hours.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 407 - Advanced Fiction Writing


    A fiction workshop at the advanced level.  This is the advanced level course for fiction writers in the English concentration in creative writing, and may be taken in tandem with ENG 499 (capstone experience).  May be repeated once for credit.

    Prerequisites: ENG 307 and permission of Instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 408 - Advanced Poetry Writing


    A poetry workshop at the advanced level.  This is the advanced level course for poets in the English concentration in creative writing, and may be taken in tandem with ENG 499 (capstone experience).  May be repeated once for credit.

    Prerequisites: ENG 308 and permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 415 - Advanced Report & Proposal Writing


    Prepares students to write workplace proposals and reports.  Students will spend approximately four weeks analyzing proposals - including grant proposals - and reports.  Students will spend the next eight weeks researching and writing a grant proposal, a project proposal, or an analytical report.  When possible, students will work on projects for campus clients.  The last three weeks of the semester will focus on exploring visual and audio reports, including designing electronic materials that support oral presentations and preparing audio reports using podcast technology.  This course will be taught as a workshop with student writers sharing drafts, providing peer feedback, and working as collaborators.  Appropriate for senior students in the Technical/Professional Writing track; for graduate students; and for professionals interested in examining the genre of report writing.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 317 or permission.  

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 416 - Technical Editing & Document Design


    Focuses on print and online editing, including the use of traditional proofreading marks and online techniques, document layout and design, principles of copywriting, and the study of style manuals.  Follows two lines of study: one of editing / text crunching practices and one of print document design principles and practices related to the editing of documents.  The cornerstone of the course is producing a newsletter or other document for a client.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 317 or permission.  

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 418 - Topics in Professional Writing


    Topics vary according to changes in the field, expertise of the faculty, and needs of the students. Possible topics include editing, document design and desktop publishing, and professional writing in intercultural contexts. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: 6 credits in writing, including ENG 317, and permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 429 - Topics in Literature and Language


    Studies in the various topics concerning literature connected to faculty research interests (for example, utopian literature, the graphic novel, revenge in literature) or in issues pertaining to questions of language and literature, such as modern grammar, history of the English language, Old and Middle English, or theories of semiotics and linguistics brought to literary analysis.  Specific topic varies from year to year.  May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. 

    Prerequisites:  ENG 271 plus 6 hours of 300-level literature courses or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 440 - American Seminar


    A seminar on an American writer or writers or a focused epoch or movement in American literature.  Topics vary, depending on the professor. Student research and writing will be emphasized.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 271 plus 6 hours of 300-level literature courses or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 445 - The American Novel


    Readings from the major American novelists: Stowe, Melville, James, Twain, Dreiser, Wharton, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Cather, and Faulkner, among others. Focus on thematic, technical, and narrative developments in the 19th and 20th century American novel.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: 6 hours of literature or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 459 - British Seminar


    A seminar on a British writer or writers or a focused epoch or movement in British literature.  Topics vary, depending on the professor.  Student research and writing will be emphasized. 

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 271 plus 6 hours of 300-level literature courses or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 460 - Major Authors


    An in-depth seminar of from one to three major writers.  Topics vary, depending on the professor.  Student research and writing will be emphasized.  May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and the Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 271 plus 6 hours of 300-level literature courses or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 470 - Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism


    Studies in the history of literary criticism, in selected theoretic perspectives, or in the application of specific critical approaches. Specific topic varies from year to year.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 271 plus 6 hours of 300-level literature courses or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENG 471 - Literature, Gender, and Gender Theory


    Introduction to gender theory and issues of gender as reflected in the reception, interpretations, and transmission of literary texts.  Emphasis on cultural assumptions surrounding gender, which involve both women and men.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ENG 271 plus 6 hours of 300-level literature courses or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 490 - Research Seminar in Literature


    A seminar course on a small body of primary literary texts and the critical communities concerned with them. Students propose and write original researched papers that demonstrate knowledge of current research in the field, using appropriate research methods and conventions of scholarly bibliography.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: ENG 271 and 6 hours of 300 or 400 level literature courses or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 496 - Field Experience in Professional Writing


    Students work with businesses, professions, and other organizations approved by the department. The work in the course varies with each student enrolled and with the needs of the cooperating employer but normally involves either research, public relations, reporting, editing, interviewing, indexing, or other allied activity requiring skill in reading and writing. May be repeated for credit up to 6 credit hours.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone

    Prerequisites: 9 hours of writing including ENG 317 and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6
  
  •  

    ENG 497 - Independent Study in English


    Advanced study and research in literature and/or theory not covered by other courses.

    Prerequisites: Senior Standing and permission of the instructor.  May not be repeated.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ENG 499 - Capstone Experience in English


    Pre-professional experience supervised by an English faculty member, attached to an appropriate 3 credit English course (i.e.  completion of a substantial critical paper based upon content of a 400-level literature course; a semester tutoring in the Writing Center after ENG 395: English Internship; ENG 496: Field Experience; or completion of a finished manuscript after an appropriate 400-level creative writing course. (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    General Education Requirements: Capstone

    Prerequisites: Senior English major and permission of department

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 0

Finance

  
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    FIN 257 - Introduction to the Bloomberg Terminal


    This course will train students in the use of the Bloomberg terminal software via hands-on application and analysis.  Students need not be finance majors.  However, given that Bloomberg is a financial tool, students should have some familiarity with, and interest in, finance when taking this course.  Some of all of the following topics will be explored at an introductory level via the terminal software:  stocks, bonds, charting, fund analysis, economics, supply chain analysis, and Excel integration.  Students will also use the software to analyze broader business issues in marketing and management. If this course was taken as a topics course in MGT 290, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FIN 350 - Business Finance


    Introduces the principles of finance including time value of money, security valuation, capital budgeting and measurement of risk. Emphasis is on financial decision-making in the corporate environment.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in ACC 201, ECO 120, ECO 121, and in one of the following: MAT 115, MAT 116, or MAT 126; junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FIN 351 - Valuation and Corporate Investment Decisions


    A course in advanced corporate finance with a focus on project and enterprise valuation.  Students explore advanced issues in capital budgeting and explore in depth the financing decisions of the corporation, which include raising capital both privately and publicly.  Other important topics may be introduced such as a capital structure and dividend policy.  Includes case studies.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in FIN 350 and in STS 215 or STS 232.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FIN 352 - Financial Institutions


    Analyzes the operations and economic roles of financial institutions, including commercial, savings and investment banks. Particular attention is paid to the changing nature of this industry, regulation and deregulation and management of risk.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in FIN 350; junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FIN 353 - Investment Strategy


    Examines the construction and management of investment portfolios.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in FIN 350 and STS 215 or STS 232.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FIN 454 - Financial Derivatives


    Examines the practices of futures, options and swaps markets, particularly the economic function of these markets and their application in banking, portfolio management, international finance and individual investment programs.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in FIN 350. Junior Standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FIN 455 - International Corporate Finance


    Applies the concepts and principles of corporate finance to the multinational corporation. Focuses on gaining an understanding of the international financial environment, the measurement and management of foreign exchange risk, global financing activities and foreign direct investment.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MGT 343, FIN 350.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FIN 456 - Financial Planning and Portfolio Management


    This course is designed to teach students skills common to the financial advising and portfolio management professions.  During the first half of the course, students learn how to make appropriate client recommendations around financial planning issues such as budgeting, insurance, retirement planning, and taxes.  These skills inform the second half of the class, where students learn how to build and rebalance portfolios for retail and institutional clients using a variety of investments, including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and EFTs.  Be the end, students should be able to develop an investment policy statement and a financial plan for a theoretical client.  The course includes case studies and group work. If this course was taken under as a topics course in MGT 490, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: FIN 350 and STS 215 or STS 232

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FIN 490 - Special Topics in Finance


    Study of various aspects of functional areas of finance.  Topics vary depending on faculty and student interests.  May be repeated for credit if the topics differ.

    Prerequisites: FIN 350 and Junior  Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

First-Year Experience

  
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    FYS 100 - First-Year Seminar


    Introduction to UMaine resources, academic programs and strategies for achieving academic success and is taught by students’ academic advisors. Activities designed to foster exploration and evaluation of interests, goal and abilities and their relationship to potential majors and careers.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1

Food Science and Nutrition

  
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    FSN 101 - Introduction to Food and Nutrition


    A survey of food and nutrition principles, including the influence of food patterns on health and physical performance; description of a balanced diet; study of the nutrients, interrelationships, sources, effects of processing and storage, food safety, fads, controversies.

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FSN 103 - Science of Food Preparation


    Basic food preparation skills. The relationship between structure, composition and nutritive value of foods. Lec 2, Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: FSN 101, Food Science and Human Nutrition major or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    FSN 121 - Brewing with Food Science


    This course is designed to utilize the process of making beer as a model to engage students in thinking about the biology, chemistry and processing aspects of the foods they consume.  The course will focus on the process of beer making as well as the ingredients that go into beer and their functions.  Other topics will include the history of beer (from world and U.S. perspectives), styles of beer and a beer judge’s perspective of beer.

    General Education Requirements: Application of Scientific Knowledge

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FSN 202 - Foodservice Management


    An overview of the foodservice industry including quantity food production and service, designing physical facilities and administration of foodservice facilities. Topics covered include food and worker safety, menu planning, purchasing, receiving, storage, production, assembly, distribution, service, facility design and equipment, management functions and financial principles. Lec 3

    Prerequisites:  FSN 101 and MAT 115 or MAT 116  or MAT 122

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FSN 230 - Nutritional and Medical Terminology


    Fundamentals of vocabulary for nutritionists and other health professionals. Web-based.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FSN 238 - Applied Food Microbiology and Sanitation


    Microbiology as it applies to the causes and control of food spoilage; issues of food safety and sanitation in food systems. Upon completion of the course, students will be eligible for a ServSafe Manager certification. The official examination will be given on campus (Orono) during the week of final exams as scheduled.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FSN 265 - Functional Concepts in Nutrition


    A functional approach to food and nutrition principles, including detailed review of digestion and absorption; the influence of food patterns on health and physical performance; description of a balanced diet; study of the nutrients, interrelationships, sources and health benefits.

    Prerequisites: FSN 101 and BIO 100

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FSN 270 - World Food and Culture


    An investigation of the status of the world food supply, food in the developing world, and food in the developed world, with emphasis on sustainability of food systems, as well as an exploration of food selection and preparation in a cultural context.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FSN 290 - Career Pathways in Human Nutrition and Dietetics


    This course will focus on exposing students to career options with their degree in Food Science and Human Nutrition and concentration in Human Nutrition and Dietetics.  Students will develop knowledge and skills to succeed in pursuing their career choices.

    Prerequisites: FSN 101, Human Nutrition and Dietetics concentration or permission, Sophomore standing;

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FSN 301 - Life Cycle Nutrition


    Principles of nutrition applied to needs of individuals throughout life. Study of relationship among nutrition, growth, development, and aging with emphasis on physical and psychosocial influences on nutritional status. Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive Requirement.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing and a grade of C- or better in BMB207 or CHY 121; BIO 208 or BIO 200; BMB 208 or CHY 122; and FSN 101.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    FSN 305 - Foods Laboratory


    The Foods Laboratory will focus on principles of quantity cooking, recipe modification and standardization, food preservation, and food processing. Course will include field trips during class hours.

    Prerequisites: FSN 103 and FSN 202

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    FSN 330 - Introduction to Food Science


    Covers general characteristics of raw food materials, principles of food preservation, processing factors which influence quality, packaging, water and waste management and sanitation. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BMB 207 or CHY 121, BIO 100 (prerequisite or corequisite).

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FSN 340 - Food Processing Laboratory


    An introduction to thermal processing, freezing, dehydration, extrusion and curing as applied to food products in the laboratory. Lab 3

    Corequisites: FSN 330.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FSN 396 - Field Experience in Food Science and Human Nutrition


    An approved program of work experience which contributes to the academic major and for which academic credit is given.  Students may work part time or full time for a semester in a job related to their professional career goals.  May be taken more than once with departmental approval.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1 - 16

  
  •  

    FSN 397 - Independent Studies


    Independent studies in specific areas of food management, food science and human nutrition.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6
  
  •  

    FSN 401 - Community Nutrition


    Examines human needs and delivery systems within community setting. Focus on designing, implementing, and evaluating nutrition education programs or intervention projects. Field experience.  Course will include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone

    Prerequisites: FSN 410 and a grade of C or better in FSN 301

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    FSN 406 - Nutritional Care of Older Adults


    Overview of older adults’ nutritional challenges and common food-drug interactions.  Students will conduct an environmental scan of a community for nutrition services available to older adults and barriers to obtaining healthful food.  Students gain hands-on experience with the Nutrition-Focused Physical Exam, Mini-Mental State Examination, the International Dysphasia Diet Standardization Initiative.

    Prerequisites: FSN 301 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FSN 410 - Human Nutrition and Metabolism


    Science of human nutrition is studied, stressing body metabolism as integrated with organ function for normal individuals, and requirements for energy and nutrients.

    Prerequisites: BIO 208 or BIO 200, and a C- or better in BMB 322 or BMB 360.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    FSN 412 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I


    Develops skills in clinical nutrition assessment, therapeutic diet calculations, and nutrition support. Emerging areas of nutrition in relation to disease prevention and treatment will be discussed.

    Corequisites: FSN 410

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FSN 420 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II


    Metabolic and physiological alterations of disease processes. Modification of normal diets to treat specific diseases. Development of nutrition care plans. Lec 4.

    Prerequisites: FSN 412 and NUR 303.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
 

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