Jul 03, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Chemical Engineering

  
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    CHE 386 - Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II


    A continuation of CHE 385. Emphasis on homogeneous mixtures, multi-component vapor-liquid equilibria, chemical reaction equilibria and the thermodynamic analysis of chemical processes. Lec 3. (Fall and Summer.)

    Prerequisites: CHE 385 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 410 - Advanced Materials


    Covers the basic structure, processing and properties of metals, polymers and ceramics and stresses the application of chemical engineering principles to the problems of materials fabrication with emphasis on emerging technologies such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Lec 3. (Fall.)

    Prerequisites: CHY 122, MAT 126 and PHY 122 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 420 - Colloid Technology


    Designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of colloid and surface chemistry from various types of colloids and colloidal phenomena, commonly encountered in chemical process industry and classical and modern measurement techniques to applications of colloids and surface chemistry. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: CHE 385 or CHY 471 and MAT 127 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 430 - Introduction to Polymer Science and Technology


    Concept of macromolecules and synthesis of polymers from monomers. Step-growth and addition polymerization. Polymer structure, molecular size and shape and characterization techniques. Polymer solutions and phase equilibria. Solid state properties. Polymer morphology and transitional phenomena. Crystalline and amorphous states. Glassy, rubbery and viscous behavior. Rheological aspects. Viscoelasticity. Survey of commodity thermoplastics, engineering polymers and uses. Polymer additives and blends. Basic processing techniques. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: CHY 122 and CHY 251 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 460 - Biochemical Engineering


    Application of chemical engineering principles to systems utilizing microorganisms, tissue culture and enzymes for processing. Applications to food, pharmaceutical and fermentation industries will be discussed. No previous background in biological sciences required.

    Prerequisites: BEN 202 or CHE 368 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 461 - Combustion and Fuel Processing


    The aim of the course is to provide the scientific and practical background for the operation of combustion systems and for combustion gas pollution abatement. New developments as a result of the availability of new biofuels and combustion technologies will be outlined. Conversion of fossil fuels and biomass into heat, steam, power, transportation fuels, and chemicals will be describe with the emphasis on mass and energy balances.

    Prerequisites: CHY 121 and MEE 230 or CHE 385 or MET 233 or MET 433.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 477 - Elements of Chemical Engineering Design


    Introduction to chemical engineering design and economics.  Considers principles of design, process flow diagrams, heat and material balances, rate equations, transport phenomena, materials compatibility, material selection, and cost estimating techniques as well as principles of engineering economics involving time value of money, taxes, depreciation, profitability indicators, alternative investment and optimization.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHE 111, CHE 493, & CHE 479, this course satisfies the General Education Ethics requirement.

    Prerequisites: CHE 360 and CHE 362

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 478 - Analysis, Simulation and Synthesis of Chemical Processes


    Covers three areas: process analysis, steady state process simulation and process synthesis. Analysis of process flowsheets to understand material flows, unit operation function and interactions between units. Simulation and design of unit operations and complete chemical processes using process simulation software. Synthesis of chemical processes including chemical reactor and separation system configuration based on heuristic methods. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: CHE 360, CHE 362, CHE 368 and CHE 386 or permission. 

    Corequisites: CHE 477.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 479 - Chemical Engineering Design Projects


    Application of engineering principles to the solution of complex, open-ended, design problems involving feasibility, analysis, design and optimization of chemical or biological systems, processes, instrumentation and techniques.  Emphasis on oral and written communications and working in small design groups.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience requirement. Together with CHE 111, CHE 493, & CHE 477, this course satisfies the General Education Ethics requirement.

    Prerequisites: CHE 477 and CHE 478

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    CHE 493 - Chemical Engineering Seminar


    Discussion of recent developments in the chemical engineering field, in addition to related fields.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHE 111, CHE 477, & CHE 479, this course satisfies the General Education Ethics requirement.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 0-1
  
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    CHE 494 - Chemical Engineering Practice


    A cooperative work experience in a commercial operation of the chemical process industry. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 credit hours. (Offered by arrangement.)

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar

  
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    CHE 497 - Independent Study


    Individual, independent study of a specialized topic under supervision of an advisor and at least one other faculty member. A formal report is required upon completion of the study. Maximum of 3 accumulated credit hours.

    Prerequisites: CHE 477 and CHE 478 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: Ar
  
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    CHE 498 - Special Topics in Chemical Engineering


    Class work in selected subjects in the field of chemical engineering, or related areas of science and technology, not covered in other courses. May be repeated for credit. (Offered by arrangement.)

    Prerequisites: permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    CHE 499 - Undergraduate Thesis


    Original investigation of a chemical engineering problem. The topic must be chosen prior to the senior year. A committee of at least three faculty members will supervise the thesis and its defense. Maximum of 3-6 accumulated credit hours. (Offered by arrangement).

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1-6

Chemistry

  
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    CHY 101 - Chemistry for Everyday Living


    A non-mathematical introduction to the basic principles of chemistry with an emphasis on chemistry relevant to everyday life. Topics will include nuclear, food, agricultural, drug, cosmetic and polymer chemistry. May be taken without CHY 102.  Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHY 102, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge Requirement when taken without CHY 102.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
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    CHY 102 - Chemistry for Everyday Living Laboratory


    Accompanies CHY 101. Experiments will emphasize chemical topics relevant to everyday living. Lab 3.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHY 101, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    CHY 104 - The Chemistry of Food and Cooking


    A non-mathematical approach to basic chemistry and chemical principles using food and cooking as the common theme.  During the course of the semester, we will use different food and cooking topics to explore a variety of themes in chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on understanding why and how something works in a laboratory and the application to the “real world”, in this case, the kitchen. The lab will complement the course by providing hands-on experience with topics covered in lecture and by emphasizing the scientific method through examination of food and cooking.  Lec 3, Lab 1

    General Education Requirements: Basic or Applied Lab Science

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Alternating years

    Credits: 4
  
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    CHY 105 - Majoring in Chemistry


    Introduces students to the faculty, students, facilities and resources central to their major in chemistry. Topics covered include requirements and advising for the major, library resources, research laboratories and projects, and the special expertise of the faculty.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: First-year students only.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1

  
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    CHY 121 - General Chemistry I


    First semester of a two-semester sequence covering fundamental principles in chemical science presented in quantitative terms. Topics include matter, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, quantum theory, atomic structure, electronic configurations, periodic properties of elements, bonding theories, and molecular geometries. This course and CHY 123 (taken concurrently) provide the basis for further study of chemistry. Lec 3

    General Education Requirements: General Education Requirement: Together with CHY 123, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.  

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 111, 116, 122 or 126, or no grade in any of these and a passing score on part 2 or 3 of the Math Placement Exam.

    Corequisites: CHY 123

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 122 - General Chemistry II


    Second semester of a two-semester sequence covering fundamental principles in chemical science presented in quantitative terms. Topics include gases, intermolecular forces, properties of solutions and solids, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, aqueous ionic equilibria, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. This course and CHY 124 (taken concurrently) provide the foundation for all further studies in chemistry.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHY 124, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement. Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge Requirement when taken without CHY 124.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in both CHY 121 and CHY 123.

    Corequisites: CHY 124

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 123 - General Chemistry Laboratory I


    Introduction to experimental techniques and the process of scientific inquiry in chemistry. Emphasis is placed on making connections between macroscopic experimental observations and chemistry occurring at the atomic scale. Laboratory investigations are designed to help strengthen chemical understanding of concepts such as conservation of mass, limiting reactants, heats of reaction, greenhouse gases, chemical redox reactions, chromatography, and spectroscopy. CHY 123 is taken concurrently with CHY 121.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHY 121, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Corequisites: CHY 121

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1
  
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    CHY 124 - General Chemistry Laboratory II


    A continuation of CHY 123.  Emphasis is placed on making connections between macroscopic experimental observations and chemistry occurring at the atomic scale. Laboratory investigations are designed to help strengthen chemical understanding of concepts such as properties of gases, phases of water, freezing point depression, chemical kinetics, acids and bases, chemical equilibria, buffers, dissolved oxygen, and spectroscopy. CHY 124 is taken concurrently with CHY 122.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHY 122, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in both CHY 121 and CHY 123.

    Corequisites: CHY 122.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1
  
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    CHY 131 - Chemistry for Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineers


    A one-semester course in general chemistry designed for civil, mechanical, and electrical engineering majors.  Topics in solution chemistry, aqueous equilibria, kinetics, modern materials, and electrochemistry are emphasized.  Enrollment is restricted to civil, electrical and mechanical engineering majors.  This course does not serve as a prerequisite for other chemistry courses.

    Prerequisites: MAT 122 (or MAT 126 or MAT 127) and only Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering majors. 

    Corequisites: CHY 133

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 133 - Chemistry for Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineers Laboratory


    A one-semester laboratory course in general chemistry designed for civil, mechanical, and electrical engineering majors.  Topics in solution chemistry, aqueous equilibria, kinetics materials, and electrochemistry are emphasized.  Enrollment is restricted to civil, electrical and mechanical engineering majors.  This course does not serve as a prerequisite for other chemistry courses.

    Prerequisites: Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering majors. 

    Corequisites: CHY 131

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    CHY 242 - Principles of Quantitative Analysis and Solution Equilibria


    Topics covered include gravimetric and titrimetric methods of analysis and acid-base, complex formation, precipitation and oxidation-reduction equilibria. Spectrophotometric, potentiometric and chromatographic methods of analysis will be introduced. Laboratory determinations will provide examples of the above. Lec 3, Lab 4.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in both CHY 122 and CHY 124.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 5
  
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    CHY 251 - Organic Chemistry I


    Properties and reactivity of organic compounds with emphasis placed on functional groups, bonding, stereochemistry, reaction pathways, and curved-arrow mechanisms. The topics in this class will complement the organic chemistry covered in other courses including biology, chemical synthesis, engineering, and microbiology.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in both CHY 122 and CHY 124.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 252 - Organic Chemistry II


    Reactivity of organic compounds and applications to synthesis. Spectroscopy is discussed in relation to compound characterization and structure elucidation. The topics in this class will complement the organic chemistry covered in other courses including biology, chemical synthesis, engineering, and microbiology. Emphasis will be placed on understanding why and how a chemical reaction takes place and the application to the “real-world.”

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in CHY 251.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 253 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I


    A laboratory course designed to complement the topics covered in CHY 251 by giving hands on experience with the concepts presented in class. Emphasis will be placed on introductory laboratory techniques, data analysis, and laboratory safety.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in CHY 251 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 2
  
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    CHY 254 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II


    A laboratory course designed to complement the topics covered in CHY 251 and CHY 252 by giving hands on experience with the concepts presented in class. Emphasis will be placed on reaction setup, data analysis (including spectroscopic methods), and laboratory safety.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in CHY 251 and CHY 253.  

    Corequisites: CHY 252

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 2
  
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    CHY 261 - Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry


    The primary purpose of this course is to explore a significant portion of the sub-discipline of inorganic chemistry, with an emphasis on the transition elements. The arrangement of elements in the periodic table will guide understanding of trends in structure and reactivity. Applications of inorganic chemistry to medicine, materials and catalysis will be discussed.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHY 122.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 298 - Introduction to Chemistry Research and the Chemistry Profession


    Topics covered will include introduction to chemical literature databases; data analysis tools; careers in chemistry; laboratory safety; and information about choosing a research project.  For students in BS degree programs that require a semester of research (CHY 498) this course is expected to result in the initiation of a research project. Students in the BA degree program have the option to focus more on exploring career opportunities for chemists.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    CHY 393 - Undergraduate Seminar in Chemistry


    Discussion of developments in chemistry and the chemical profession. Introduction to chemical literature and research methods. Oral presentations and written papers required.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Chemistry major; A grade of C- or better in CHY 122 and CHY 298.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 394 - Field Experience/Cooperative Education


    Supervised employment with relevance to the study of chemistry in the public or private sector. A proposed program of study, mutually agreed upon by the student, faculty adviser, and “Co-Op” sponsor may be carried out in the summertime or during the academic year. A written report is required.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing with a good academic record; permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-9

  
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    CHY 423 - Introductory Polymer Chemistry


    Fundamentals of polymer types, synthesis kinetics and mechanisms, characterization techniques, and molecular structure.

    Prerequisites: a grade of  C-  or better in CHY 252  and MAT 127 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 431 - Structure and Mechanism in Biological Chemistry


    Examination of biosynthetic pathways, structure and function of enzymes (including metalloenzymes) and other important biomolecules, methods of structure determination and synthetic pathway elucidation and mechanisms of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in CHY 252

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 443 - Instrumental Analysis


    Modern tools for acquiring qualitative and quantitative data about the composition and structure of matter. A blend of theoretical and experimental/hands on approaches to investigate modern spectroscopic and separation techniques for solving “real world” bioanalytical and environmental problems. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in CHY 242 and CHY 471.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 461 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I


    Advanced theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry emphasizing covalent bonding and molecular orbital theory, transition metal complexes and coordination chemistry, symmetry and group theory, and applications to bioinorganic and materials chemistry.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in CHY 261 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 462 - Organometallic Chemistry


    Principles and applications of organotransition metal chemistry. Topics include coordination chemistry, group theory, organometallic reaction mechanisms, electrochemistry, photochemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, catalysis and applications to organic synthesis. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHY 252 and CHY 261.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring 

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 471 - Physical Chemistry I


    Applications of classical thermodynamics to the study of chemical systems. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHY 122; MAT 127 and PHY 112 or PHY 122 or equivalent

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 472 - Physical Chemistry II


    Covers electrochemistry, kinetic theory of gases, transport processes and reaction kinetics and an introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in CHY 122; MAT 228 and PHY 112 or PHY 122.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 475 - Physical Chemistry III


    An introduction to quantum mechanics, spectroscopy and chemical bonding. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: PHY 122, MAT 228 and MAT 258 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 477 - Nanoscience


    An introduction to nanoscience that details the basic principles and recent developments of nanoscale science and technology. Students will learn both the fundamental concepts of nanoscale science and its application to the development of new materials, processes technology and devices. Scientific explanations for the basis of nanoscale derived properties will be illustrated by specific research examples. Topics will include: nanoscale materials, micro/nano fabrication, nano instrumentation, atomic manipulations and nanorobotics. CHY 477 and ECE 457 are identical courses.

    Prerequisites: CHY 122 or CHY 131 and PHY 122 and MAT 258.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 483 - Introductory Wood Chemistry


    Emphasis on the chemical and physical properties of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and extractives. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in CHY 252 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 490 - Topics in Chemistry


    Advanced treatment of specialized topics in chemistry.  Topics vary.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 491 - Advanced Integrated Laboratory I


    An advanced laboratory environment integrating inorganic, instrumental and physical chemistry concepts. Synthetic techniques, instrumental methods, reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and spectroscopy will be included. As a writing intensive course, an emphasis is placed on developing skill in writing formal laboratory reports. Lab 6.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CHY 242, CHY 261, CHY 254, and CHY 471 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 492 - Advanced Integrated Laboratory II


    This course is the second semester of an advanced laboratory course that integrates inorganic, instrumental, and physical chemistry concepts. The purpose of the course is to build on and extend the laboratory and technical writing skills acquired in CHY 491, with an emphasis on more independent lab work. Students work collaboratively in teams and with faculty instructors to design and carry out an experimental plan that may be developed as a theme for CHY 491. Results will be presented using a combination of oral and written formats.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHY 498, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement for the BS degree. Together with an upper level chemistry elective CHY 4XX, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement for the BA degree.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CHY 491. Chemistry majors only or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHY 498 - Undergraduate Research


    Students will conduct a research project under the supervision of faculty member.  A total of three credit hours are required for the BS degree in Chemistry. It is recommended that students register for one credit in each of three different semesters to fulfill this requirement.

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHY 499, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience requirement for the BS degree (ACS certified). Together with CHY 492, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement for the BS degree.

    Prerequisites: CHY 298

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    CHY 499 - Undergraduate Thesis


    Written report of an original investigation carried out in the library and laboratory.  

    General Education Requirements: Together with CHY 498, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement for the BS degree (ACS certified).

    Prerequisites: CHY 498 and Senior Standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3

Child Development and Family Relations

  
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    CHF 200 - Family Interaction


    Interpersonal dynamics of dating, courtship, mate selection, and the development of family life. Changing patterns of personal interactions within the family life cycle and a pluralistic society.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 201 - Introduction to Child Development


    Influences on human development from conception through middle childhood. Theoretical perspectives, empirical evaluation and practical implications.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 203 - Practicum in Early Childhood Programs


    Introductory practicum combining child development and education theory with supervised weekly participation in the Child Development Learning Center. Focuses on the child under six years of age. Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201 and Permission of Instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 303 - Infant/Toddler Care and Development


    Examines issues related to quality care and early education for children ages 0-3. Emphasis on family diversity and inclusion integrated in course material. Includes six hours of lab observation.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 304 - Practicum in Early Childhood Education K-3


    Students will apply principles of child development to the education of children in grades K-3. Emphasis is placed on identifying scientifically-based practices and techniques associated with exemplary early childhood education programs. Skills in child observation, developing and modifying a range of approaches to instruction, child guidance, and family involvement in schools will be addresses in a participatory class and supervised field placement.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201, CHF 203 and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 311 - Creativity and the Young Child


    Exploration of theoretical and research evidence pertaining to the nature of creativity and the conditions requisite for its expression. Includes developmental stages, strategies, materials and workshops in specific areas including children’s art, music, creative movement, story telling, play and creative dramatics.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 316 - Literacy and the Youngest Learner


    Review of specific subject areas in the field. This subject area focuses on literacy development from birth to age 5, with particular emphasis on child care and school settings as sites for literacy-learning.  Previously offered as CHF 404 Literacy and the Youngest Learner.

     

     

     

    Prerequisites: CHF 203 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    CHF 321 - Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Young Children Science


    Applies developmental theory to the construction of curriculum and methods in early childhood education. Students explore a range of curriculum models, approaches and strategies as they learn to apply theory to meeting children’s learning needs individually and in groups. Topics including role of teachers in promoting learning, assessment, documenting learning, inclusion and family involvement are stressed.  Science serves as the content anchor for discussing curriculum and methods issues.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201, CHF 203, EHD 204

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 322 - Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Social Studies


    Students will develop integrated curriculum focusing on social studies for young children.  Issues of inclusion, assessment, and family involvement are integrated into class content to promote social competence in young children.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: CHF 201, CHF 203, EHD 204

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 329 - Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Young Children Math


    Presents activities and instruction to support candidates’ lesson planning and assessment in math for teaching young children.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201, CHF 203, EHD 204

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 331 - Cognitive Development


    Introduction to the developmental processes involved in the acquisition, organization and processing of information, with an emphasis on the period between infancy and adolescence. Discussion of current theories and research on cognitive, memory and language development and their applications and implications for teaching and parenting.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201, PSY 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 351 - Human Sexuality


    Discusses sexuality and its social implications against a background of constantly changing sexual mores, sex role development, alternative conceptualizations of sexuality, and implications for future trends in human interaction.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 381 - Family Resource Management


    Analysis of the managerial process and its relationship to decision making. Emphasis on the use of resources including time, energy, and money to attain family goals.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 385 - Personal and Family Finance


    Influence of outside economic conditions and personal circumstances on family financial problems. The management process applied to family problems involving finances, economic position, meeting living costs, protection against financial contingencies, credit, developing a savings and investment program.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 401 - Peer Education


    Students are trained in the realities and consequences of critical social issues college students face and provide workshops on responsible behavior to campus and community groups.

    Prerequisites: CHF 351 and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 404 - Selected Topics in Child Development and Family Life


    Review of specific subject areas in the field. Subject areas vary by semester. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 406 - Introduction to Research Methods in Child Development and Family Relations


    An overview of research methods applicable to the study of children and families. An in-class research project is completed.   (This course is identical to HUD 556.)

    Prerequisites: CHF 200 and CHF 201, or Human Development Graduate students.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 409 - Special Problems in Child Development and Family Life


    As available.

    Prerequisites: permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar
  
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    CHF 421 - Student Teaching in Early Childhood


    Supervised student teaching in pre-kindergarten and K-3 settings.  (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Child Development and Family Relations major with senior standing and Teacher Candidacy.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 12
  
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    CHF 422 - Field Placement in Early Childhood Education


    Individual study in selected early childhood settings such as Pre-K classrooms or home visiting programs.  Includes developmental assessments, planning and implementation of education programs.

    Prerequisites: Junior, Senior or Graduate Standing and permission of instructor

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3-6
  
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    CHF 423 - Professional Seminar in Child Development and Family Relations


    An integrated examination of career-related roles, ethics, and responsibilities in research and service to individuals and families.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience Requirements.

    Prerequisites: Child Development and Family Relations major; senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 424 - Professional Seminar for Early Childhood Specialists


    Examination of issues such as ethics, advocacy, collaborating with families and other professionals and professional development.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement.

    Corequisites: CHF 421

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 431 - Parenting


    Parent behavior and the dynamics of parenthood are studied. Emphasis on interpersonal, familial, and societal roles of parents, and factors influencing role behaviors and expectations.

    Prerequisites: CHF 200, CHF 201.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 432 - Socialization of the Child


    A study of normal development and behavior with emphasis on the impact of peers, school and family on the developing child. Theory in child development is also examined.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 433 - Adolescence


    Growth and development during the adolescent years. Conceptual models and recent research are discussed.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201 or PSY 100 and sophomore standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 434 - Adult Development and Aging


    Developmental processes and transitions from the early to later years of adulthood. Social, physical, cognitive, and familial aspects of adult growth and aging are examined.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 441 - Family Life Education Methods


    Provides students with an overview of the knowledge, skills, methods, current materials and resources to plan, implement and evaluate family life education programs for diverse learners including K-12 students, parents, community members, educators and other professionals. Students will practice developing and presenting educational programs.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 442 - Helping Skills


    Examines the nature of helping relationships including descriptions, characteristics, stages and ethics of effective helpers and helping relationships. Considerable attention will be focused on learning the nonverbal and verbal responses used in helping interactions. To assist in the development of these helping skills, students can expect to be engaged in extensive practice sessions with classmates.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHF 450 - Early Childhood Special Education - Inclusion in the Early Childhood Classroom


    The emphasis of this course is on early intervention for young children with disabilities in group settings. The course will focus on history and rationale, legal foundations, theoretical perspectives service delivery models, family-professional partnerships, assessment practices, and curriculum development.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201 and CHF 203.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHF 451 - Family Relationships


    The study of traditional and non-traditional family units as a system of interactions between individuals.

    Prerequisites: CHF 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHF 452 - Violence in the Family


    Major forms of family violence, including child abuse and neglect, sexual abuse, and spouse abuse, are examined to provide students with an understanding of the development of dysfunctional forms of family interaction, descriptive knowledge on the prevalence of violent relationships at the national and local level, the necessary skills for identifying victims of abuse and the services available to them, and a preliminary understanding of the challenge of designing intervention strategies.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, CHF 200 or SOC 318 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHF 488 - Family Legal Issues


    Issues of legal interest to consumers. Social and economic effects on families will be emphasized.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHF 496 - Field Experience in Human Development and Family Studies


    An approved program of work experience for department majors that involves the application of theory and research in applied settings. Requires a written proposal outlining the proposed experience, its relation to the student’s program of study, plan for faculty supervision and a final written report. No more than 6 credits may be used toward the departmental major and not more than 12 credits may be used toward the graduation requirements.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6


Chinese

  
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    CHI 101 - Elementary Chinese I


    A systematic study of the basics of the Chinese language. Equal emphasis is placed on developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Culture is also an integral component of this course. Intended for students with no prior study of Chinese or fewer than two years in high school. This course is the first of a 2-semester sequence.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 5
  
  •  

    CHI 102 - Elementary Chinese II


    A systematic study of the basics of the Chinese language.  Equal emphasis is placed on developing listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Culture is also an integral component of this course.  Intended for students who have successfully completed CHI 101.  This course is a second of the 2-semester sequence.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: CHI 101

    Credits: 5

Civil and Environmental Engineering

  
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    CIE 100 - Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering


    Introduces first-year and transfer students in Civil Engineering to the multifaceted field of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Each week a different faculty member will conduct the class. Challenging problems will be introduced and team work will be practiced. Lec 1. (Fall.)

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

     

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    CIE 101 - Civil Engineering Graphics


    Graphic principles, concepts and techniques involving civil engineering applications. Exercises will be done in 2D/3D using CADD software. 1.0 ED/2.0 ES. Lec 2, Lab 2. (Spring.)

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 110 - Materials


    The structure, properties, and testing of engineering materials and their use in constructed facilities. Analytical tools used to quantify material properties are covered along with appropriate statistical tools for quantifying uncertainty.  Basic microstructure-property relationships are established, as are the fundamental mechanisms for strength and toughness.  The production and properties of concrete, steel, wood and polymer composites are covered along with relative advantages and disadvantages of each as a construction material.  The bases for material selection are established using both technical and non-technical consideration. (0.0 ED/3.0 ES)

    Prerequisites: MAT 122, MAT 126 or concurrently or MAT 116

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 111 - Materials Laboratory


    Evaluation of material performance under applied loads for engineering applications. Physical properties of concrete, metals, plastics and wood. Exercises include study of the variability of materials, construction of probability density functions from test data and computation of the probability of failure. (1.0 ED/0.0 ES.) Lab 2 (Fall.)

    Corequisites: CIE 110

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    CIE 115 - Computers in Civil Engineering


    Introduces the student to computers and computations by solving examples relevant to civil engineering. The algorithmic aspects of programming as well as the development of simple graphical user interfaces are taught. Approximately one half of the course time is allocated to programming with the remainder involving problems and applications. Specific examples typically include problems from structures, geotechnical, transportation and environmental engineering. Emphasis is placed on examples introducing statistical methods. Also introduces the use of spreadsheets, word processing and a mathematics program. (0.0 ED/3.0 ES.) Lec 2, Lab 3

    Prerequisites: MAT 126, Civil Engineering majors only.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 210 - Sustainability in Engineering


    Introduction to sustainability and sustainable development concepts; role of engineers in sustainable development; ethical dimension of sustainable development-engineers, technology and ethics; measuring sustainability; green and sustainable materials; engineers as problem solvers and curators of the planet. No specialized background in engineering, sciences or social sciences is required.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment and Ethics

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 225 - Transportation Engineering


    An introduction to the broad field of transportation with emphasis on the motor vehicle mode. Principles of roadway and urban transportation planning, economic analysis methods, and route design elements are discussed and related to the planning and design of highway transportation routes. Students design a section of roadway and prepare a technical paper on a current transportation engineering problem. (3.0 ED/0.0 ES.) Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: Civil Engineering majors or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    CIE 331 - Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering


    Introduction to environmental engineering including water quality, water and wastewater treatment plant design, solid and hazardous wastes, landfill design, radioactive waste control and air pollution abatement (1.0 ED/2.0 ES.) Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in CHY 131, CHY 133, and MAT 127.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 340 - Introduction to Structural Analysis


    The cyclic process of analysis and design. Structure idealization and modeling. Design methodologies and loads considerations. The analysis of determinate trusses, beams and frames. Introduction to indeterminate structures. (1.0 ED/3.0 ES.) Lec 3, Lab 3

    Prerequisites: C or better in MEE 150 and in MEE 251.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CIE 350 - Hydraulics


    An elementary course presenting fundamental principles of fluid flow and their applications to engineering problems. Includes study of hydrostatics, liquid measuring devices and channel and pipe flow. (0.0 ED/3.0 ES.) Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in  MEE 150

    Corequisites: Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 258 or MAT 259.  MAT 258 or MAT 259 may be taken concurrent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 351 - Hydraulics Laboratory


    Application of hydraulic principles in laboratory experiments. Includes experiments on buoyancy and flotation, forces on submerged planes, venturi meter calibration, pipe friction, losses, weirs and others. (0.0 ED/1.0 ES.) Lab 2

    Prerequisites: CIE 350 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CIE 365 - Soil Mechanics


    An introduction to fundamental physical properties, engineering behavior and performance of soils and rocks. (0.0 ED/3.0 ES.) Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: MEE 251 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 366 - Soil Mechanics Laboratory


    Covers geotechnical laboratory testing including classification, density, permeability, shear strength, and consolidation tests.  Project reports are also submitted to ECP 366. (0.0 ED/1.0 ES.) Lab 2.

    Corequisites: CIE 365 and ECP 366.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CIE 394 - Civil Engineering Practice


    Cooperative work experience in civil and environmental engineering. Up to three credits may count toward the degree.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 1-3

  
  •  

    CIE 411 - SL: Engineering Project Design


    Student design teams develop the conceptual design of an active civil engineering project. Topics include: consulting firm practice, the design process, evaluation of alternatives, regulatory constraints and the permit process, legal, ethical and social aspects of professional engineering practice, cost and scheduling estimations. Oral presentations and written technical reports are required. Open only to civil engineering students during their last spring semester. (3.0 ED/0.0 ES.) Lec 2, Lab 3.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone

    Prerequisites: CIE 413.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 412 - Engineering Decisions


    Application of various analysis methods to engineering design decisions.  Evaluation of economic, financial, legal, and ethical factors affecting engineering design.  Introduction to ethics theory, general concepts, and principles pertaining to engineering ethics and handling ethical situations in practice. Topics include: engineering ethics with case studies, engineering economy, consideration of risk and uncertainty, and evaluation of ambiguous and intangible factors in engineering design.  This is a writing intensive course.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Senior standing

    Corequisites: CIE 413

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CIE 413 - SL: Project Management


    Students study the role of civil engineers in the implementation process of engineering projects from project conceptualization through design, construction, commissioning, start-up and operations.  Students practice using project management themes by creating a proposal for providing a schematic design feasibility study for a community partner.  Topics include: project life-cycle, project management tools, quality and risk management, required deliverables of design, scheduling of resources and personnel, and work breakdown structure.

    Prerequisites: ENG 320 and Senior standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
 

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