Dec 03, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Spanish

  
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    SPA 308 - Readings in Spanish American Literature


    Emphasis on changes in the cultural phenomena, styles, themes and ideological position of texts from the beginnings of Hispanic American literature through romanticism, naturalism, the novel of the land, the “Boom” and avant-garde movements. May be taken before or after SPA 307.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: SPA 306 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 309 - Spanish for the Professions


    Designed to provide students who have an intermediate-level knowledge of Spanish familiarity with specialized language and conventions in professional situations. Emphasis will be given to vocabulary and writing skills for professional use as well as awareness of Hispanic culture, cross-cultural communications and applications in Spanish speaking countries. Authentic up-to-date information will require regular use of the Internet as a source of reading. All classes are conducted in Spanish.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: SPA 204 or SPA 217

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 310 - Contemporary Latin American Cultures


    This course will show students the contrasting and diverse cultures of Latin America.  Students will learn about Latin American peoples’ knowledge, technological development, modern life, and traditional cultures.  The themes for reading and discussion will be about patrimony (what a people has from their past), art, enterprises, products, market, personalities, syncretism (mixing of cultures), migrations, history, science and society.  Students will improve listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: SPA 204 or SPA 217

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 311 - Latinos in the U.S.


    Hispanics are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, and much of that growth is driven by immigration. In this course we cover: the definition of immigration, the Latino experience in the United States, and Latinos in Maine. We approach these topics through different types of authentic material: literature (stories, poems, and excerpts from novels), newspaper and magazine articles, blogs, songs, plays, movies, television, radio, video clips, audio clips (podcasts) and art (graffiti, mural, painting, digital art, cartoon, and photo). We also talk with Latino immigrants from different countries of origin. Students will improve listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish.

    The course will be taught entirely in Spanish and the readings will be in the target language.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity or International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: SPA 204 or SPA 217

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate years.

    Credits: 3

  
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    SPA 350 - Multi-disciplinary Readings in Spanish


    This course is intended to be taken in conjunction with an approved co-requisite course in another discipline, where key texts are originally written in Spanish.   SPA 350 supplements the content of the course with appropriate readings in Spanish and promotes increased proficiency in Spanish through reading and discussion in Spanish of texts important to other disciplines.  May be repeated for credit for a total of three credit hours.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Credits: 1
  
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    SPA 390 - Topics in Spanish


    May include the study of literature, culture, cinema, the arts and media as expressed in Spanish-speaking countries.  Topics vary.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: SPA 204 or SPA 217

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    SPA 401 - Golden Age


    A survey of the rich cultural output of one of the most powerful and complicated empires in human history.  Through critical readings in the lyric poetry, drama, and prose fiction of the 16th and 17th centuries, this course seeks to investigate the lasting cultural legacies of the Spanish empire’s projects of colonial exploration and expansion.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: SPA 307 or SPA 308 or permission of the instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 403 - Cervantes


    A careful reading of the Spanish masterpiece, Don Quixote, including its historical background and continuing influence.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: SPA 307 or SPA 308 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 409 - Contemporary Latin-American Short Story


    A study of Latin-American short story writers including discussion of such significant contemporary concerns as poverty, politics and religion, and such themes as the interplay of fantasy and reality and the relativity of madness.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: SPA 307 or SPA 308 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 410 - Latin American Novel


    The contemporary novel in Spanish America, with special attention on some of the novelists of the “Boom.”

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: SPA 307 or SPA 308 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 414 - History of the Spanish Language


    An historical panorama of the development of Spanish from late Latin on the Iberian Peninsula to the globally dynamic language of our present. Students will study the modern Spanish language in Europe, Africa, the Americas, and around the world, how this language came to be, and how it continues to change. Linguistic notions gleaned in this course have relevance to other modern languages, including English, as well as to the idiosyncrasies and common points of confusion in Spanish. 

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity or International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: INT 410 or permission. 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 415 - Feminism and Literature


    Feminism is one of the most consequential intellectual traditions of the West. This course will examine this far-reaching current of thought in the global literature of the Spanish language, from medieval precursors to twenty-first-century texts.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions 

    Prerequisites: SPA 307 or SPA 308

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 416 - Modernism(o) and Avant-Garde


    Across the Hispanic world, writers like Cesar Vallejo, Federico Garcia Lorca, Ruben Dario, Roas Chacel, and Jorge Luis Borges, along with visual artists like Salvador Dali, Maruja Mallo, and Pablo Picasso define what it means to be modern at the beginning of the twentieth century.  This course examines and explores the complicated topic of modernity by surveying Hispanic art and literature from about 1898 to 1945.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creativity Expression and Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: SPA 307 or SPA 308

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, alternating years

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 420 - Spanish Film


    Areas covered may vary and could include the following topics: national cinemas; director of note; the social, political, historic and economic factors that influence both the creation and content of films; and an analysis of the components of cinematography. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: Any 300-level Spanish course or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 444 - Theory and Techniques of Translation


    Designed to develop awareness of linguistic styles and structures and emphasize the complex relationship between a language and its context. Taught as workshop, with regular assignments of texts for translation, comparison and evaluation. Selections from literature and general topics, although this is not a literature course. Attention given to theories of translation both past and present and how these theories respond to cultural and ideological perspectives; and relate to Spanish translation.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspective and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: SPA 306 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    SPA 490 - Topics and Individual Authors in Spanish


    Specific topic varies semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Any 300-level Spanish course or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    SPA 495 - Senior Project in Spanish


    Capstone Experience in which majors in Spanish and in International Affairs with a concentration in Spanish, or in Cultures, Languages and the Humanities, apply language skills and knowledge gained from all prior language study.  Students work closely with a faculty advisor on an approved project and give a public presentation of the project in Spanish. When taken as a stand-alone course, the coursework will reflect the work of three credit hours, regardless of number of credits taken. When taken in conjunction with another Spanish course at the 400 level, the course will carry no credit and will be graded Pass/Fail only.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, Western Cultural Tradition and Capstone Experience

    Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

    Credits: 0-3
  
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    SPA 498 - Projects in Spanish II


    Independent study on topics selected by student and instructor.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1-3

Statistics

  
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    STS 215 - Introduction to Statistics for Business and Economics


    For students in the Maine Business School and for others concentrating in business or economics. A limited introduction to probability theory leading to discussion of distributions of random variables, in particular the normal and binomial families; a brief treatment of descriptive methods; an introduction to inferential statistics, including one- and two-sample procedures for estimation of parameters and for hypothesis testing; fundamentals of regression analysis or contingency table analysis or contingency table analysis as time permits. 

    Due to overlapping content, course repeat rules are applicable for STS 215 and STS 232.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    STS 232 - Principles of Statistical Inference


    Intended for students who will use statistics as an aid to the comprehension of quantitative work done by others and for students who will follow this course by an intermediate level applied statistics course. An introduction to the language and methods of statistical analysis, probability, graphic and numeric descriptive methods and inference from sample data. 

    Due to overlapping content, course repeat rules are applicable for STS 215 and STS 232.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school math required.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3

  
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    STS 332 - Statistics for Engineers


    Statistical methods applicable to engineering including theory and application of classical and nonparametric methods.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 228.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    STS 434 - Introduction to Statistics


    Topics include probability, random variables, continuous and discrete distributions, point and interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, analysis of variance.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MAT 228.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    STS 435 - Introduction to Mathematical Statistics


    Topics include moment generating functions, distribution of functions of random variables, sampling distributions, principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, limit theorems and order statistics.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in STS 434.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    STS 436 - Nonparametric Statistics


    Surveys nonparametric alternatives to standard parametric techniques. Emphasis on situations in which the use of a parametric technique is incorrect or, at best, marginal.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in STS 434 or STS 437.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    STS 437 - Statistical Methods in Research


    An introduction to analysis of variance and regression analysis using a unifying approach to theory; application and illustrations from many fields.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in STS 232 or STS 434 or Department permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

Surveying Engineering Technology

  
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    SVT 100 - Introduction to Surveying Technology


    Discussion of the major topics in surveying engineering technology including field instrumentation, boundary surveying, topographic surveying, computer-aided drafting, route surveying, global positioning system and geodesy, map projections, photogrammetry, remote sensing, and geographic information systems. Will include lectures from practicing professionals in their respective disciplines. Lec 1.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    SVT 101 - Basic Surveying Field and Office Processes


    A beginning course studying surveying instruments and their use in the measurement of angles, distances and elevations.  Also includes mathematics, computational methods, adjustments and measurement analysis used in plane surveying.  RTK GPS and creating ground surfaces is included.

    Corequisites: MAT 122 or equivalent

     

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    SVT 102 - Surveying Principles for Civil Engineers


    The course is a study of surveying instruments, procedures and computations. The course will cover grade, cross-section, construction stakeout, horizontal curves, reverse curves, compound curves, area computations, volume computations, mapping, introduction to geographic information systems, and introduction to global positioning systems. Lec. 2 Lab 2

    Prerequisites: None.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 110 - Instrumentation and Data Collectors


    Instrumentation used in various aspects of surveying engineering technology and the systems that communicate with those systems (generically known as data collectors) will be discussed. Systems for processing, display, and presentation of results will also be demonstrated. Photogrammetric data collection will be examined as an alternative to direct field methods. Lec 1.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    SVT 121 - AutoCAD for Surveyors I


    Provides an introduction to computer aided drafting and design using AutoCAD. Covers concepts, techniques and procedures of menu systems, drawing setup, coordinate systems, draw and modify commands, display control, creating and working with layers and file management. Also covers editing, viewing, dimensioning commands, paper space, xrefs, and attributes. Lec 2, Lab 2. Students who take SVT 121 after CIE 101 will only receive credit and grade for SVT 121.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 122 - AutoCAD for Surveyors II


    Using Autodesk Land Desktop 2006, Autodesk Survey 2006 and Civil 3D 2006 software, land surveying applications will be studied, including terrain modeling, surface boundaries, breaklines and contours; horizontal alignment and vertical alignment design; route surveying including road sections using templates; construction surveying including grading and volume calculations; downloading, creating, and analyzing survey data and performing data adjustments, and dynamic engineering models. Lec 2, Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: SVT 121.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 201 - Adjustment Computations


    Basic statistics as applied to surveying, error estimation, error propagation, basic matrix algebra, level network analysis, 3-D traverse analysis, GPS vector network analysis, combined traditional total station and GPS network analysis, blunder detection, positional tolerance, hypothesis testing. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: CET 202, STS 215  or STS 232, MAT 117 or MAT 127 and SVT 110 or equivalent

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 202 - Route & Site Surveying


    Study of surveying procedures in construction.  Includes volume computations, horizontal curves, compound curves, reverse curves, vertical curves, stakeout, grade layouts, profile and cross sections, and surface modeling.  Instrument experience is emphasized using total stations, laser levels and G.P.S.

    Prerequisites: SVT 101 and MAT 116 or MAT 126

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 221 - Boundary Law


    Covers historical to present United States land title conveyancing, historical surveying procedures, colonial and pre-colonial land grants, the United States public land survey system, rules of construction and procedures for boundary retracement, recording systems, interpretation of property descriptions, and professional responsibility. Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: CET 101 or SFR 208, or two years of surveying practice

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 322 - Preparing Effective Property Descriptions


    Covers principles of interpretation, techniques and forms for descriptions and preparation of land descriptions. Layout, content, and display of plats and descriptions will be covered. Web-based. Lec 1.

    Prerequisites: SVT 221; Prerequisite or Corequisite: SVT 122; or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    SVT 329 - Site Planning and Subdivision Design


    Subdivision rules and regulations, creating lots of esthetic value, satisfying minimum lot requirements, acreage calculations, cul-de-sacs, integration of site features to optimum development, application of civil engineering principles to land development and land development software. Lec 1.

    Prerequisites: SVT 122, SVT 322 and SVT 332 or equivalent, or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    SVT 331 - Photogrammetry


    Includes procedures and methods used for deriving metric information from photographs, analog processes for using serial photographs in production of topographic maps, flight planning and cost estimation in aerial mapping work. Introduction to photo-coordinate measurement devices and their calibration.
     

    Prerequisites: CET 101 and MAT 116 or MAT 126

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 332 - Engineering for Surveyors


    The study of topics related to engineering site work, highway design, drainage, hydrology, hydraulics, on-site sewer design, water system design, erosion control, sedimentation control, conduits, wetlands delineation, soil mapping, and flood plain mapping. This is an on-line course. Prepared videos containing lecture material will be made available for viewing by students. Students may view the videos within a prescribed period of time.

    Prerequisites: CET 101 or SFR 208

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 341 - Advanced Surveying


    Geodetic horizontal and vertical datums, plane projection systems, localization of projection coordinates, datum transformations, astronomic observations, cadastral surveying as applied to the U.S. Public Land Survey System, creation of survey products in a computer-aided drafting environment, engineering related photogrammetry (job planning, control aspects, map collection and processing, and image based products). Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: CET 202 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 352 - Practical Field Operations


    Making optimal use of a survey data collection system in creation of office survey products, building checks in survey collection, automated field techniques which create office linework, optimizing feature coding and descriptive abilities, deciding between use of GPS and optical survey devices for survey projects, optimization of stakeout and building checks in that process, surveying documentation and reporting. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: CET 202, ENG 317 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 418 - Fundamentals of Surveying Exam Overview


    A review of all elements of the “day #1” nationwide element of the examination which leads to licensure as a professional land surveyor. Practice examinations on all topics covered in this exam. Lec 1.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    SVT 437 - Practical GPS


    Presentation of all types of GPS equipment with their uses and limitations, GPS observation planning based on satellite geometry and obstructions, review of geodetic coordinate systems and datums, the geoid and how it relates to the production of elevations from GPS, execution of all components (planning, field collection, downloading, processing, and adjustment) of a GPS survey where raw data is collected, real time kinematic (RTK) GPS filed execution and adjustment for control work, use of RTK GPS in collection of a topographic survey. Lec 2, Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: SVT 341 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 451 - Survey Business Law


    Studies the fundamental legal concepts and the development and application of law on society, business, engineering and surveying. Covers legal structure, business entities, agency, mechanics liens, torts, bonding, contract administration, contracts, contract formation, contract codification, liability, indemnification, warranties, remedies, damages, the uniform commercial code, alternate dispute resolution, international law, legal research, and land use restrictions. Lec 3. (Fall.)

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 475 - Small Business Management


    Provides a broad overview of the skills necessary to operate a small business. Focuses on teaching basic marketing, accounting and management skills with an emphasis on topics that impact the small business owner. Lec 3. (Fall.)

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 490 - SL: Surveying Capstone


    A class project type course which integrates all components of previous surveying coursework and emphasizes working with others on a long term project; project description, project planning, field collection, office processing, computer-aided drafting, final product preparation, oral presentation of results. Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone

    Prerequisites: SVT 341, SVT 437, SVT 352 or equivalent.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SVT 498 - Selected Topics in Surveying Engineering Technology


    Topics that are not regularly covered in other courses. Content varies to suit individual needs. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: Ar

Theatre

  
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    THE 111 - Introduction to Theatre


    A basic appreciation course for the general student as well as prospective theatre majors that explores the process of theatrical expression throughout history and its relationship to culture.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 112 - Survey of Dramatic Literature


    Survey of drama from its early development up to the present as literature and as theatre. Stress on dramatic form and content and on the uniqueness of the drama to reflect the philosophical, social and political environment.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 117 - Fundamentals of Acting


    Focus on the basic skills of acting, including internal preparation for playing a role, character analysis, vocal and physical development and techniques for projecting to an audience.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 120 - Introduction to Stagecraft


    Designed to provide a foundation in the practice of technical theatre and preparation for work in scenery, lighting and sound. Emphasis is placed on procedures, practice and nomenclature. The required lab, that accompanies this course, provides hands-on experience, through special projects, designed to reinforce specific technical skills discussed and demonstrated in class.

    Corequisites: THE 121

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 121 - Introduction to Stagecraft Laboratory I


    Provides hands-on experience, through special projects, designed to reinforce specific technical skills discussed and demonstrated in THE 120.

    Corequisites: THE 120

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    THE 122 - Introduction to Stagecraft Laboratory II


    Provides hands-on experience, through special projects, designed to reinforce specific technical skills discussed and demonstrated in THE 120.

    Prerequisites: THE 120 and THE 121

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    THE 130 - Introduction to Costume Construction


    Basic processes of theatre costume construction. Includes measuring, building and fitting techniques, safety in the costume studio and fabric properties and selection. Skills are developed through construction of a personal project and participation in building costumes for productions.

    Corequisites: THE 131

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 131 - Introduction to Costume Construction Laboratory


     

    Laboratory in costume production work.

    Prerequisites: Required for theatre majors.

    Corequisites: THE 130

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1

  
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    THE 200 - Design for Performance


    This course is a study of the theory and principles of designing light and space for performance.  It takes an interdisciplinary view of design and includes lectures, demonstrations, and practical application of ideas, techniques, and methods used in designing many types of performance in the political, legal, business, religious, sporting, and artistic arenas.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 201 - Fundamentals of Characterization


    Designed to help student actors develop a methodology and technique for analyzing character and performing scenes from the modern theatre repertoire.

    Prerequisites: THE 117 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 216 - Play Production


    Covers the basic principles of stage directing including choosing and analyzing plays, scheduling rehearsals, blocking action, and determining stage business.  The class culminates in a showcase of student-directed works.  Consequently, this is a “hands-on” course, in which students get to choose, possibly write, cast work, with actors, and direct their own small stage production.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: THE 117

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 268 - Theatre Practicum, Technical


    Supervised experience in Theatre and Dance Division productions in the areas of stage managing, publicity, scenery, lighting, costumes and makeup. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    THE 269 - Theatre Practicum in Acting


    Laboratory work in acting. Credit assigned by agreement of advisor and show director, based on learning opportunities of role. May be repeated for a maximum of three hours.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    THE 300 - Introduction to Performance Studies


    This course takes the broad spectrum approach to the study of performance, examining all of human behavior and events through a social-scientific approach that employs various means of cultural analyses.  Through an intercultural, intergeneric, and interdisciplinary approach, all of human behavior is viewed as performance and the impulses and agendas behind it are examined on an individual as well as cultural level.  Ultimately, this course focuses upon the many ways in which “performativity” is evident in human transactions in the arts, business, technology, politics, and religion. Lecture and discussion format.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 310 - Topics in Theatre Technology


    An advanced study in specific areas of technical theatre. Subjects vary from year to year but may include lighting technology, sound, scenic painting and properties, costume pattern drafting, costume crafts or stage management. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 311 - Drafting for the Theatre


    This class is designed as an introduction to theatrical drafting.  Topics covered will include hand and computer drafting for scenery and lights.  Students will gain the ability to communicate in the theatre through proper vocabulary and with an understanding of standardized drafting techniques.  They will also have the ability to read, understand and work from draftings and translate a design into a shop drafting.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years.

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 313 - Stage Management


    This class is designed to provide a student with the fundamental knowledge to pursue stage management at the University of Maine and to understand the basic small group dynamics and diplomacy tactics necessary for a successful stage manager.  Students will gain a practical working knowledge of theatre and its relationship to stage management as well as a general understanding of what a stage manager does and why.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 320 - Topics in Theatre Design


    Study of the theatre design process in a specific area, including costume, lighting, scenic or sound design. Encompasses research, drafting or drawing, script analysis, budgeting and organizational skills required to design in the specified field. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 321 - Lighting Design


    This course explores the principles and theory of elements related to theatrical lighting design.  It includes demonstrations, and practical application of ideas, techniques and methods employed in the theatre production process.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate years

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 322 - Scene Painting


    This course explores the craft of the theatre scenic artist.  It includes lectures, demonstrations, and practical application of ideas, techniques, and methods used to paint scenery for the stage.  Properties of light, color, texture, and line will be discussed as well as techniques in antiquing, wood graining, and marbling.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate years
     

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 400 - Voice and Speech for the Actor


    A studio course in the principles of voice production and speech for the stage. Focus is on the development of the actor’s voice and speech through exercises that heighten awareness of breath, encourage freer expression and expand vocal range and clarity.

    Prerequisites: THE 117 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 402 - Movement Training for Actors


    A studio course in movement training and development for actors. Focus is on the use of the elements of movement and Laban’s effort-shapes to explore text and its expression and to expand the movement vocabulary of the actor.

    Prerequisites: THE 117 and two credits in DAN or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 403 - Styles and Techniques of Comedy


     

    Concentrates on the nature of comedy and comedic character addressing challenges such as timing, movement and relationship from all sources of dramatic literature from verse to modern comedy, from absurdism to tragic comedy.

    Prerequisites: THE 117, THE 301 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3

  
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    THE 415 - Capstone Experience in Theatre


    A synthesis of the major’s knowledge in a selected area of interest within theatre or dance. Students develop a professional portfolio based on their cumulative experiences in Theatre or Dance while working with a faculty member. May include a research paper, design, direction, performance or choreography. Project must have been generated as part of a student’s coursework or under the supervision of a faculty member. A final presentation of the Capstone project to Theatre/Dance faculty is required.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone Experience and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: Senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    THE 460 - Theatre History


    The development of performance and its relation to culture, from the ancient world to contemporary theatre and performance, including Asian, and African theatre.  Examines the evolution of styles and modes of production through the major theatrical figures, performance events and institutions of each period.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 466 - Stage Directing


    Studies the task of all aspects of the theatre production into an artistic unity with emphasis on theatre aesthetics. Provides practice in the directing of short plays, with particular attention to working with actors.

    Prerequisites: THE 216.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    THE 480 - Topics in Theatre


    Advanced study of selected topics in Theatre. Explores the particular approaches, thematic content or contemporary issues related to acting, performance theory, genre, directing, costume and make-up design, set and lighting design or other areas of technical theatre. Specific topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    THE 497 - Independent Study in Theatre I


    No description available.

    Prerequisites: permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    THE 498 - Independent Study in Theatre II


    No description available.

    Prerequisites: permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

University Studies

  
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    UST 100 - Introduction to the Bachelor of University Studies


    Introduces the student to the nature of higher education as a learning community. Particular emphasis given to academic resources, the learning process, academic skills, developmental advising and career counseling. Students participate in extensive reading and writing assignments relevant to their college transition and degree goals.

    Prerequisites: Bachelor of University Studies major; others by permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    UST 300 - Core Course in University Studies


    Provides understanding and insight into skills in critical thinking, analysis, and writing across disciplines.  Emphasis on research analysis and integrative thinking.
     

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    UST 400 - Advance Topics in University Studies


    This independent study course allows students enrolled in the Bachelor of University Studies Program to focus more deeply in an area of their choice.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Bachelor of University Studies Majors and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-6.
  
  •  

    UST 499 - Senior Capstone


    Interdisciplinary senior research project. Senior students will use their areas of foci to build on their knowledge and apply it to a specific senior project or internship. Students will integrate program knowledge and demonstrate synthesis, analysis and critical evaluation of their specific project.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone

    Prerequisites: senior standing, Bachelor of University Studies major.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

Wildlife Ecology

  
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    WLE 100 - Introduction to Wildlife Resources


    A seminar introducing the opportunities, concerns, and professional responsibilities of the wildlife profession. Intended for first-year and transfer students interested in wildlife management. Lec 1. Course will include field trips during class hours and on weekends.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Wildlife Ecology major or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    WLE 150 - Wildlife Field Trip


    A one-week field course to introduce wildlife ecology students to various aspects of fish and wildlife management.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: WLE 100; first-year Wildlife Ecology major.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    WLE 200 - Ecology


    Ecology is the study of how distribution and abundances of organisms over time and space relate to major physical, chemical, geological, historical, biological, evolutionary, and energetic factors. This course provides students with a sound and relevant ecological framework through which they can better understand and explain the past and present, and prepare for the future, on a complex and rapidly changing planet whose productivity and life-support capacity is increasingly eroded by the industrialized human economy. WLE 200 is required for undergraduates majoring in Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology but is suitable for students in most majors.

     

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge requirement when taken without WLE 201.  Together with WLE 201, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences requirement.

    Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 100 and BIO 200 or SMS 201, or instructor’s permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    WLE 201 - Ecology Laboratory


    A course emphasizing field and laboratory studies of plants and animals and their environments. A diversity of organisms and ecosystems will be investigated.

    General Education Requirements: Together with WLE 200, this course satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.  WLE 201 alone satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Requirement.

    Prerequisites: Wildlife Ecology major or permission; an ecology lecture course (i.e. WLE 200) may be taken concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 220 - Introduction to Ecological Statistics


    An introduction to the use of quantitative statistical methods for the purpose of answering ecological questions that provides information and techniques useful for advanced courses in wildlife ecology and other environmental sciences, with emphasis on presenting and interpreting results verbally and in writing.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C or better in MAT 122 or in MAT 116, or C- in MAT 126, and Grade of C- in WLE 200 and WLE 201 or SMS 300 or BIO 319.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    WLE 230 - Introduction to Wildlife Conservation


    Basic principles of wildlife ecology and conservation are illustrated with examples from Maine and around the world.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 250 - Wildlife Field Survey


    Two week field course stressing the use and application of wildlife research and management techniques, collection and analysis of biological data and the recognition of wildlife species and their habitats.

    Prerequisites: Department Consent and student must meet these requirements: WLE 100 and a C- or better in WLE 200, WLE 201, and WLE 220. Wildlife Ecology major.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 323 - Introduction to Conservation Biology


    Maintaining the diversity of life forms in the face of environmental degradation involves the study of population ecology, population genetics, and ecosystem ecology plus the socioeconomic and political matrix in which conservation problems must be solved. Class ends before Thanksgiving.  Required attendance for one or two Saturday sessions.

    General Education Requirements:  Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: BIO 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 340 - Freshwater Fisheries Ecology and Management


    An ecological approach in studying freshwater fisheries and evaluating management tactics.  Topics include general fish ecology, population dynamics, bioenergetics, stock-recruitment, habitat quality, biotic interactions, anthropogenic effects, recreational fisheries, management tools, assessment methods, nongame species, and human dimensions.  Field-intensive, with emphasis on Maine fisheries and interaction with fishery professionals.

    Prerequisites: BIO 329 and BIO 319 or SFR 407 or SMS 300 or WLE 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 341 - Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory


    If taken with WLE 340, will be considered a Field Intensive course in WLE curriculum and will satisfy a requirement for WLE’s Fisheries Concentration. 

    Course Note: Occasionally, field trips will extend past 5:00 pm and one-weekend field trip is required

    Prerequisites: WLE 340 or concurrently

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    WLE 410 - Wildlife Population Dynamics and Conservation


    Characteristics of wildlife populations, including principles of population dynamics and population interactions, with application in wildlife population conservation. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: WLE 200 or SMS 300 or BIO 319, or permission.




    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 411 - Wildlife Population Dynamics Lab


    Focuses on field and quantitative techniques used to evaluate components of wildlife population ecology. Students will gain experience in methods commonly used to estimate animal occupancy, abundance, survival, reproduction, and rate of population growth through time. Students will collect data in the field, analyze data in a computer laboratory setting, and interpret and present results in formal reports and presentations. Course may have field trips during class times.

    Corequisites: WLE 410

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    WLE 423 - Wetland Ecology and Conservation


    Focuses on major concepts in wetland ecology, classification, policy and regulation and issues in wetland conservation. Lecture material focuses on wetland communities associated with hydric soils (forested, shrub and emergent ecosystems). Lecture and field studies. Lec 3, Lab 3. (Fall - even.)

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: WLE 200 or equivalent or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    WLE 431 - Wildlife Management in Forestry


    Students apply knowledge of silviculture and forestry practices to management of habitat for forest wildlife species.  This course covers concepts of wildlife ecology, biological diversity, ecological forestry, and wildlife habitat management.  Science-based applications will focus on management practices, comparison of management options, and government guidance for managing forest wildlife habitat at varying spatial and temporal scales.  Time in class is divided between two lectures (2 hr) and one lab (3 hr) period each week.  Course may include field trips during class time.

     

    Prerequisites: SFR 408 or SFR 349 or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    WLE 435 - Field Experience


    A field experience in wildlife is a professional activity participated in by students under the supervision of a practicing professional in the field. A high degree of responsibility is placed on the student for developing learning objectives and securing the approval of a faculty member for academic credit for the learning involved in the experience. It may be paid or unpaid, it may last any length of time, and it may be repeated.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: Ar
  
  •  

    WLE 440 - Undergraduate Wildlife Seminar


    Current topics of interest will be explored in a seminar format.  Course may be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Wildlife Ecology major or permission; junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-12
  
  •  

    WLE 450 - Wildlife-Habitat Relationships


    A study of the interrelationships among wildlife species and their habitats stressing application to conservation of biological diversity and management of harvested species. Focuses on a review and critique of habitat objectives, an assessment of habitat components, a discussion of the influence of spatial scales and landscape pattern on habitat quality, a survey of procedures for evaluating habitat quality, a synopsis of inter-specific interactions as they influence habitat relationships, and discussions of the influence of natural and human-caused disturbances on habitat. Lec 3. Course will include field trips on weekends.

    General Education Requirements: Together with WLE 455, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience requirement.

    Prerequisites: WLE 250 and WLE 410 or permission.

    Corequisites: WLE 455

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 455 - Wildlife-Habitat Evaluation


    Focuses on field, analytical and laboratory techniques for evaluating habitat for wildlife. Students will be introduced to the applied approaches and techniques for evaluating habitats. Material is presented via lectures, reading, fieldwork and laboratory experience.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive.  Together with WLE 450, this course also satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience requirement.

    Prerequisites: WLE 250, WLE 410 or permission.

    Corequisites: WLE 450

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    WLE 457 - Ecology and Management of Game Birds


    This course provides a broad survey of topics relevant to the ecology and management of the ducks, geese, grouse, quail, and woodcock that are native to North America - species we typically consider “Game Birds” because of their popularity for human harvest.  We’ll place particular emphasis on species that regularly occur in Maine.  In doing so we will cover a number of areas related to avian biology in general, including taxonomy, physiology, behavior, and species’ conservation, and will synthesize across subjects that are relevant to wildlife ecology as a whole.  The course content will include a mix of lectures, class discussions, group and independent projects, and field trips.  This class is designed to meet the University requirement as a writing intensive general elective, and will means that you will required to complete a major written project as a component of the course and will receive feedback on your writing and have the opportunity to revise your work. One weekend field trip will be required.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone Experience and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: WLE Major; Senior Standing or instructor permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 461 - Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Conservation


    This course is a mix of lectures, invited presentations, hands-on group activities, and peer to peer exercises that provide students with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to effectively engage and communicate with diverse stakeholders in collaborative management. The course covers such topics as governance of wildlife, sense of place and community, trust and capacity development, wildlife management as a systems process, collective behavior, engagement of stakeholders, collaborative planning and decision-making, adaptive management and adaptive impact management, identity-based conflict resolution, communication planning, and human dimensions research methodology. Participating in one Saturday or Sunday workshop (TBD) is required. Course may have field trips during class times.

    Prerequisites: Junior, Senior or Graduate Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    WLE 470 - Wildlife Policy and Administration


    Development and state and federal wildlife policy in the United States. Procedures for establishing and implementing policy and current policy issues. Rec 3. Course may have field trips during class times.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
 

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