Jul 03, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Plant, Soil and Environmental Sciences

  
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    PSE 457 - Plant Pathology


    This course provides an understanding of the biology of plant diseases, the agents that cause them, the conditions that affect their severity, and the methods used to manage them. Students should develop the ability to recognize or diagnose particular diseases and an understanding of the principles of disease management. PSE 457 and PSE 557 cannot both be taken for credit. Course may include field trips during class hours.

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing and either BIO 100 or PSE 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    PSE 469 - Soil Microbiology


    This course considers the physiological, biochemical and ecological diversity of soil microorganisms and their interactions with other organisms and the environment. Topics include microbial cycling of organic matter and nutrients in soil, sustainable soil management, microbial interactions with important resources such as energy, and pathogenic organisms.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 and BMB 207/209 or CHY 121/123 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSE 479 - Crop Ecology and Physiology


    An examination of agricultural systems focusing on the physiological responses of plant communities and the critical role of nitrogen, water relations and photosynthesis within these communities. Extensive reading and a written project are required.

    Prerequisites: PSE 100 and PSE 105 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3

Political Science

  
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    POS 100 - American Government


    Introduces the major principles, structures, processes and policies of United States government. Covers the Constitution and its development, civil liberties, federalism, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the nature of the presidency, the bureaucracy, the Congress and the national courts.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 120 - Introduction to World Politics


    A study of contemporary international politics focusing on the interaction of nation-states and including a review of the patterns of global politics from World War II to the present.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 201 - Introduction to Political Theory


    An introduction to the fundamental questions of political philosophy–what is justice? how ought we to live our lives? what is the best regime?–through detailed study of a few central books in the history of political thought, such as Plato’s Republic and Machiavelli’s Prince.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Ethics

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 203 - American State and Local Government


    Examines the structure and activities of sub-national governments, with particular attention to state modernization, intergovernmental relations, and comparisons between Maine and other states.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 241 - Introduction to Comparative Politics


    Provides an introduction to the major themes of comparative politics, including: comparative political legacies, processes of modernization, comparative governmental institutions, modern political parties and interest groups, comparative policymaking processes, and problems of establishing and maintaining democratic government.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 282 - Introduction to American Law


    Examines the nature and function of law in America, emphasizing its evolution and incorporation as a dynamic social instrument.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 301 - Classical Political Thought


    A survey of ancient political philosophy through detailed study of selected writings of Plato, Xenophon, Aristotle, Thucydides and others.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: POS 201 or permission or junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 303 - Early Modern Political Thought


    A survey of early modern political philosophy from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment through detailed study of selected writings of Machiavelli, Descartes, F. Bacon, Hobbes, Locke and others.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: POS 201 or junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 304 - American Political Thought


    The development of political ideas in America from the founding period to the present as expounded in the writings of American statesmen and political theorists, and foreign commentators such as Tocqueville.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 306 - Crafting the American Constitution


    This course will engage students in a substantive, detailed, and critical examination of the debates surrounding the drafting, ratification, and early implementation of the Constitution of the United States.  It will begin with an examination of the important thinkers who influenced the American Founders, move to a detailed analysis of the critical issues at the Constitutional Convention and in the state ratification debates, and conclude with a look at some early government actions and Supreme Court decisions that put flesh on the bones of the Constitution.  During the entirety of this course, students will be asked to reflect on the degree to which the founding debates are still relevant to contemporary American politics and government.

    Prerequisites: POS 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 307 - Democratic Theory


    Surveys the major theoretical perspectives of democracy, emphasizing core positions such as liberalism and civic republicanism.  Examines competing articulations of more participatory and engaged democratic political systems.  Also considers critical perspectives which analyze democracy’s exclusions with regard to race, class, gender, and power.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition and Ethics

    Prerequisites: POS 201

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 336 - Government and Politics in Russia


    Examines the historical Russian political legacy, the experience of Soviet rule from 1917 until 1991, and explores in-depth current domestic and foreign politics in the Russian Federation. Focuses primarily on the development of the post-Soviet Russian political system.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: POS 100. Junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 337 - Government and Politics in Eurasia


    Examines contemporary government and politics in Eurasia, the general region from Central Asia to the Balkan peninsula of Europe. Major themes will include the formation of independent nation-states in Central Asia, the Caucasus mountain region and Ukraine following the dissolution of the USSR in 1991; and government and politics in Turkey. Also considers patterns of international relations within Eurasia and relations between these countries and the larger world.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 348 - The Politics of Sport in America


    The primary purpose of POS 348 is to engage students in a substantive, detailed, and critical examination of the intersection of sport and American society through the lens of political science. Sports and American politics and government are closely connected in myriad ways.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Summers.

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 349 - Topics in Comparative Politics


    Offers a detailed examination of a selected topic in comparative politics. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: POS 241.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 352 - American Public Opinion


    Covers the role of public opinion in shaping the American political system. It focuses on defining and measuring citizen opinion, the way citizens develop their political views and the linkages between public opinion and public policy.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions Requirement.

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 353 - The U.S. Congress


    Examines the legislative process and its components, with special attention to congressional elections, the committee structure, the impact of institutional reform and the influence of bicameralism.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or Junior or Senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 354 - The U.S. Presidency


    Examines presidential leadership in contemporary American politics. Devotes special attention to institutional, constitutional, and historical influences on the presidency. Other topics include: presidential decision-making, psychological aspects of the presidency, and the sources of cooperation and conflict between the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government. Analysis of the president’s role in foreign and domestic policy.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 355 - Music and Politics in the American Context


    Examines the intersections and interactions of music and politics in the United States.  Topics of investigation and discussion include (but are not limited to): the role of music in society, why the state might be interested in music, how music contributes to identity, and the political messages and activism produced by music.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 357 - Film and Politics


    Examines the relationship between film and politics. Explores the portrayal of American and international politics in film through a series of common, politically-relevant themes. Also considers how film has been used as an outlet for political messages, as well as an entertainment medium, and examines how political films inform society’s understanding of politics.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: None.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 359 - Topics in American Government


    Offers a detailed examination of a selected topic in American politics. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: POS 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 362 - Maine Government


    Analyzes changes in the institutions and policies of the state of Maine in recent times.  Covers the role of Maine in the federal system, the impact of institutional and organizational reform, and state policymaking.

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or Junior or Senior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 363 - Urban Government and Politics


    Examines the politics and government of urban areas in the United States, in both historical and contemporary contexts. Topics of investigation and discussion include (but are not limited to): the functions and roles of American cities, the responsibilities of urban governments, the issue of power in the metropolis, the American federal system and urban governance, race, ethnicity, and class in urban America, and the challenges facing contemporary urban society.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 368 - China


    Examines contemporary China; its recent history, political system, economic and social development, and China’s relations with its Asian neighbors and the United States.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: One HTY or POS course at the 200 level or above.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 369 - Topics in International Relations


    Offers a detailed examination of a selected topic in International Relations.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: POS 120

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 370 - International Terrorism: The Challenges for America


    Analyzes the impact of international terrorism on U.S. national security and the ethical dilemmas arising from counter-terrorism.  Topics include the evolution of terrorism, especially in Afghanistan and the Middle East; the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; and the formulation of U.S. national security strategy.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or POS 120 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 372 - Canadian Foreign Policy


    Canadian theory and practice of foreign policy, with emphasis on the major international problems which Canada faces today. Special attention is directed to Canada’s relations with the United States and other Western Hemisphere countries.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or POS 120 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 374 - American Foreign Policy


    American foreign policy and the major international problems facing the United States today. Special focus will be on United States relations with Europe, Russia, Japan and the Third World.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or POS 120.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 376 - Politics of the Global Economy


    The world is deeply integrated through cross-border financial flows and international economic institutions.  This course introduces the field of international political economy, the study of the interplay between domestic and international politics and economic policies and developments and examines the politics of trade, sovereign debt, finance, multinational corporations, global economic inequality and more.  This course can be counted either in the International Relations or Comparative Politics subfield within Political Science.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity/International Perspectives and Social Context and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 120

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 378 - Theories of War and Peace


    This course is the study of the causes and effects of the major events of conflict and cooperation which occur among and across countries. The major theme is understanding patterns of war and peace through an examination of foreign policy decision-making, international trade and investment, economic development, human rights, global environmental concerns, terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, globalization, and international organizations and institutions.

    Prerequisites: POS 120 or INA 101 or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 380 - Interest Groups and American Politics


    Every day millions of Americans act politically to defend their interests, yet Americans as a whole overwhelmingly have a negative opinion of interest groups and their involvement in the political process. How can this be? This course will examine the purposes, roles, and ultimately the results produced by interest groups in the American political process. Students will finish with a much more complete understanding of the place that interest groups occupy in the American political universe.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 381 - Political Parties and Elections


    Analyzes the development of, and current theories regarding, political parties and elections in American politics. Topics include theories of party realignment, voting behavior, party composition and behavior, and the relationship between parties, elections and democracy. Covers both presidential and congressional elections.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer & Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 383 - American Constitutional Law


    Examines the evolving nature of the U.S. Constitution through consideration of major Supreme Court decisions in areas such as federalism, legislative power, executive authority and judicial autonomy.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 384 - American Civil Liberties


    Examines the tension between individual rights and the social order through consideration of major Supreme Court decisions involving the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 385 - Women and Politics


    Examines women as citizens and leaders and also examines movements to increase women’s public role in U.S. politics. Considers racial, ethnic, partisan and class dimensions of those movements and political activities and the influence of government policies on gender relations.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 386 - Religion and Politics in the United States


    Religion has historically played a substantial role in the government and politics of the United States, and continues to do so in contemporary American society. Focuses on the intersections and interactions between religion and politics in the United States. Areas of examination include, (but are not limited to): religion and American culture, religion and the Constitution, religion and public policy, religion and individual political behavior, and religion and violence in the United States.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 453 - Political Behavior and Participation


    Looks at which citizens get involved in politics and why they do so. Examines theories involving individual choice and resources, community organizations, interest group activities and social movements. Additional topics include participation and democratic theory, historical reasons why participation has changed and proposals to increase citizen involvement in politics.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 460 - Seminar in American Politics


    Seminar in American Politics. Detailed examination of a topic or set of topics in American politics.

    Can be repeated for credit so long as it is a different seminar.

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or permission of the instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable.

    Credits: 3

  
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    POS 467 - African Politics


    Analysis of the transition from colonialism to independence in selected countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. Discussion of nation-building, the one-party system, military intervention in politics, and neo-colonialism.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: 6 hours of Political Science.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 469 - Politics of the Middle East


    The politics of the Middle East from World War I to the present. Special attention to problems of Palestine and the creation of Israel, the interplay between the politics of the great powers and Middle East conflicts, and problems of nationalism, modernization, and revolution.

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or POS 120 and junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 470 - International Law


    Examines international legal principles relating to state territory and jurisdiction, the oceans, human rights and war.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing, POS 120 or POS 374 or POS 241

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 474 - Conduct of Foreign Policy


    Examines the formulation and implementation of American foreign policy. Special focus will be placed on American Political culture; Presidential and congressional powers in foreign policy; government bureaucracies, such as the Departments of State, Defense and Treasury; and conceptual and theoretical approaches to policy making.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or POS 120 and junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 475 - International Security


    Examines national and international factors affecting the survival and security of states. Topics include components and use of military power, arms control and proliferation, the cause and resolution of conflict, negotiation and decision-making processes and structures.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or POS 120 and junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 476 - Seminar in World Politics


    A topical survey of conceptual and theoretical developments in the field of world politics. Examination of these developments in the context of contemporary issues and controversies will be emphasized. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or POS 120 and junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 484 - The American Constitution and Criminal Due Process


    Examines the development of Supreme Court doctrines governing the jurisprudence of constitutional rights afforded the criminally accused. Areas examined include the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th Amendments to the Constitution and their applicability to the states via the 14th Amendment.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: POS 100 or junior standing

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    POS 487 - SL: Practicum in Engaged Policy Studies I


    Focuses upon the critical application of analytical research skills to a community policy issue.  Examines different conceptions of community engagement and the university’s role in serving the community.  Culminates with design of an engaged research project, with a community-based organization or policy outlet serving as a research partner.   The results of this research will be shared publicly with the general public and will shape and inform future policy thinking and action on this issue or challenge. Designed to be taken as the initial course in a two-course sequence prior to POS 488, Practicum in Engaged Policy Studies II, which will be offered the following semester.  This course is a UMaine service-learning designated course.
     

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive Requirement

     

    Successful completion of both POS 487 and POS 488 satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience.

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
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    POS 493 - American Politics Internship


    Provides students with the opportunity to gain experience in a department or agency at the national, state, or local level, or to conduct a major research project. Reports and a research paper are normally required for an agency internship.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3, 6 or 9
  
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    POS 495 - Congressional Internship


    Assignment to the Washington, D.C. office of a member of Congress, normally from the Maine delegation, during the spring semester. Readings and reports are required in addition to performing staff work in a congressional office. The internship is open to juniors and seniors on a competitive basis; applications and interviews are conducted each fall to fill the spring internship positions.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 6 or 9
  
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    POS 496 - International Affairs Internship


    Provides students the opportunity to gain experience in a department or agency, either in the United States or abroad, that deals with international affairs. Students may not receive more than 9 credit hours for this internship. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

    Credits: 3, 6 or 9
  
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    POS 498 - Independent Study in Political Science


    Provides students the opportunity to work closely with an individual member of the faculty, either as a research assistant or as the author of a major independent study paper. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    POS 499 - Senior Seminar in Political Science


    Examines selected theoretical and empirical topics in Political Science. Assumes a knowledge of, and builds upon, a body of knowledge developed by students in the major and represents the culmination of majors’ concentration of study within the major. Students can write an Honors thesis instead of taking the capstone course.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience

    Prerequisites: Senior standing and Political Science major or International Affairs major with a concentration in Political Science.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

Psychology

  
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    PSY 100 - General Psychology


    Lecture on and discussions of basic psychological processes, including learning, perception, motivation and emotion, higher mental processes, individual differences, personality and additional selected topics.

    General Education Requirements: Social Context and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 208 - Theories of Personality


    Examines the chief contemporary approaches to the study of personality including critical issues in personality. Also considers assessment techniques and research methods.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 212 - Abnormal Psychology


    Examines the origin, development, and manifestations of abnormal behavior with emphasis on the biological, social, and psychological determinants of deviant behavior.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 223 - Psychology of Childhood


    A systematic study of childhood behavior and psychological development. Emphasis on principles underlying development, methods of child study and practical implications.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 224 - Psychology of Adolescence


    A study of adolescent development in the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social spheres. Adolescent personality and problems of adjustment considered in relation to the family, the school and the community, and the world of work. Covers delinquency and abnormality in adolescents.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 230 - Social Psychology


    An introduction to the study of social behavior from a psychological perspective. Representative topics include culture and personality, attitude formation and change, conformity, leadership and prejudice.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: PSY 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 232 - Environmental Psychology


    The study of the transactions between people and their physical environments. Representative topics include territoriality, crowding, personal space, privacy, architectural design of space and self-control and development phenomena.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 241 - Statistics in Psychology


    A survey of techniques used to obtain, display, analyze, and interpret data in psychology. The lecture section will emphasize the theoretical bases of the topics, while the recitation section will allow students to focus upon the computational procedures involved in the various statistical techniques.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: PSY 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    PSY 245 - Principles of Psychological Research


    Discussion of various research methods used in the scientific approach to the study of behavior. Laboratory will demonstrate these methods and develop skills in statistically analyzing data using computers. Students will learn to interpret the statistical analyses and write papers discussing the results of the experiments. Lec 2, Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: PSY 241.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    PSY 251 - Psychology of Motivation


    A survey of theory, research methodology and experimentally obtained facts related to the activation and direction of behavior.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 320 - Child Study Laboratory I


    Observation and study of preschool children, as well as participation in guiding activities. Students undertake individual projects, supplemented by reading and class discussion. Emphasis on social development in early childhood. PSY 241, PSY 245 and PSY 223 recommended.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 321 - Child Study Laboratory II


    Observation and study of preschool children. Individual projects, supplemented by reading and class discussions. Opportunity to assist in guiding the children’s activities. Emphasis on cognitive development. PSY 241, PSY 245 and PSY 223 recommended.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 350 - Cognition


    An introduction to the psychological study of human information processing and thinking. Representative topics included attention, pattern recognition, short and long-term memory, semantic memory, visual memory, mental imagery, problem solving and creativity.

    Prerequisites: PSY 245 or BIO 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 361 - Sensation and Perception


    Principles and theories of the ways we make contact with our environment by seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting and feeling. Psychophysics is covered.

    Prerequisites: PSY 241, PSY 245.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 365 - Biopsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience


    Explores the biological bases and brain mechanisms of human and animal behavior. Considers the neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and neuropharmacological foundations of sensation and perception, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, learning and memory, and psychiatric disorders.

    Prerequisites: PSY 245 or BIO 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 401 - Health Psychology


    Presents a biopsychosocial approach to the study of lifestyles, behaviors, response styles and personality factors that may impact an individual’s health. Research comes from the areas of psychology, neuroscience, public health and medicine. Topics will include the relationship of psychological and social factors on physical conditions and recent research in these areas.

    Prerequisites: PSY 212, PSY 241, PSY 245.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 412 - Foundations of Clinical Psychology


    Provides an overview of clinical psychology. Topics include the helping professions, historical development of clinical psychology, approaches to psychological assessment and psychotherapy, controversies in the field, and new directions in the field.

    Prerequisites: PSY 212, PSY 241, PSY 245; junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 422 - Infancy: Neurobehavioral Development


    Surveys current concepts and findings in infancy research with an emphasis on understanding brain-development from the perspective of behavioral and functional systems.  Areas of focus typically include perinatal behavioral adaptations, development of motor and sensory systems, early parent-infant interactions, cognition, and research on assessment methods for evaluating developmental delay.

    Prerequisites: PSY 223, PSY 241, PSY 245.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 424 - Abnormal Child Psychology


    Examines the origin, development, and manifestation of abnormal child behavior with emphasis on the biological, emotional, social, and psychological determinants of deviant behavior.

    Prerequisites: PSY 223, PSY 241, PSY 245 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 425 - Social Issues in Developmental Psychology


    An introduction to the research on current social issues in developmental psychology. Topic areas may include sex-role development, maternal employment, day care, mass media effects, the role of fathers, compensatory education, the effects of poverty, teacher expectancy effects.

    Prerequisites: PSY 223, PSY 241, PSY 245.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 430 - Current Topics in Social Psychology


    An introduction to one of several current topics in social psychology.  Topic areas may include applied social psychology, attitudes and persuasion, prejudice and stereotyping, social cognition, the self, and social influence.  May be repeated for credit. (This course is identical to PSY 630.)

    Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 230 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 465 - Hormones, Brain and Behavior


    An introduction to behavioral neuroendocrinology: the study of hormonal effects on brain and behavior in both humans and animals. Topics include the role of hormones in gender differences, parental and aggressive behaviors, stress, and cognitive processes.

    Prerequisites: PSY 365 or BIO 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 466 - Cognitive Neuroscience


    Current theory and research on brain mechanisms underlying higher cognitive processes, including perception, attention, memory, and language. Considers converging evidence from experimental studies with animals, cognitive deficits in brain-damaged humans, and recent findings based on functional imaging of the living human brain.

    Prerequisites: PSY 350 or BIO 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 470 - History and Systems of Psychology


    Surveys the development of psychology as an experimental science. Beginning with Greek views of human nature through Christian theology, the Renaissance and British Associationism. Considers Scottish and German Faculty Psychology and the 19th century developments in physiology that led directly to the birth of experimental psychology. Brief consideration of Gestalt Psychology and Behaviorism, vitalism in the life sciences and the mind-body problem in psychology.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 241, PSY 245; junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 491 - Senior Seminar in Psychology


    One or more current topics in psychology, chosen by the instructor, will be discussed. Students will conduct library research, make oral presentations and write a comprehensive review paper on each topic.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: PSY 241 and PSY 245; senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PSY 492 - Problems in Psychology


    Provides the opportunity to carry out a particular research problem under supervision. Only 6 hours of credit will count toward the psychology major.

    Prerequisites: PSY 241, PSY 245 and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar
  
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    PSY 493 - Field Experience in Psychology


    Practical experiences in a wide variety of applied settings such as schools, psychological clinics, hospitals, and government and private agencies. Requirements include a written proposal outlining the experience planned, goals of the plan, relationship of the course to the student’s program, periodic conferences with the faculty supervisor and a final written report. Three credit hours may fulfill major requirements and only 6 hours may count toward graduation.

    Prerequisites: PSY 241, PSY 245; nine hours in psychology and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    PSY 494 - Senior Research Project


    Students will develop a research project in consultation with the instructor. The student will do an extensive library search of background material, write a proposal, conduct the research and write an APA style report.  May be repeated for credit but not more than 6 credit hours total will be allowed for degree credit.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: PSY 241, PSY 245 and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

Pulp and Paper

  
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    PPA 264 - Introduction to the Pulp and Paper Industry


    Considers the manufacture of paper from fibrous raw materials to the processing of finished products. Emphasis on papers produced from wood, non-wood, and secondary fibers. Recommended for CHE/BLE students taking the cooperative work experience within the Pulp and Paper industry. Lec 3. (Spring.)

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or greater.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PPA 466 - Paper Technology


    This course will focus on the application of engineering tools to processes that are found in the paper industry.  Examples include the flow of suspensions in equipment, filtration during washing and papermaking, and the drying of a porous web.  While the processes are related to the paper industry, the method to apply various aspects of engineering to actual processes should be of interest in a wide range of industries.

    Prerequisites: BEN 202, CHE 360 or MEE 360 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    PPA 499 - Undergraduate Thesis


    Original investigation of a pulp and paper problem and reporting of the results. (Offered by arrangement.)

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar

School of Forest Resources - Forest Ecosystem Science

  
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    SFR 100 - Introduction to Forest Biology


    Introductory concepts related to forest plants, animals, environment and ecology. Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences requirement when taken with SFR 102.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SFR 220 - Environment and Society


    Introduces the concepts and principles necessary to understand the connections between human behavior and environmental conditions.  The course includes a review of the conservation and environmental movements in the United States, tracing changing American values towards forests and other natural resources over time.  Students learn how to critically analyze the social, economic, and environmental aspects of various case studies concerning society-environment connections by evaluating diverse information sources.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SFR 407 - Forest Ecology


    Biological principles and environmental factors governing the natural establishment and development of forest trees and stands. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: SFR 107 or BIO 464 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SFR 408 - Silviculture


    Theory and practice of controlling the composition, growth, quality and regeneration of forest stands for human benefit.  NOTE: Because of overlap, SFR 408 and SFR 509 cannot both be taken for degree credit.

    Corequisites: SFR 407

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    SFR 409 - Forest Ecology and Silviculture Field Laboratory


    Measurement, assessment and analysis of forest vegetation from a biological and silvicultural perspective. Designed to develop understanding and proficiency in: silvical properties of northeastern tree species; forest regeneration, succession and stand dynamics; prescribing silvicultural treatments; and formulating silvicultural systems. Weekly labs and several one-day field trips.

    Prerequisites: WLE 200 or concurrent enrollment in SFR 407. 

    Corequisites: SFR 408

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    SFR 439 - Biology of Woody Plants


    Advanced topics in woody plant biology including growth, development, and reproduction.  Emphasis on forest tree biology and tree responses to abiotic stressors.  (Because of overlap, SFR 439 and SFR 349 cannot both be taken for degree credit.)

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or SFR 100 or PSE 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    SFR 455 - Bioenergy Sources, Systems and Environmental Effects


    A detailed introduction to the use of biomass for bioenergy and includes a broad review of biomass sources, processing systems, human health effects, potential environmental damage, pollution abatement, energy generating systems and the general effects of using renewable and non-renewable sources of energy on the human population.  Common definitions, units and the basic thermodynamics of biomass use are discussed.  Environmental issues including greenhouse gas emissions are examined along with the benefits and environmental concerns related to using renewable sources of bioenergy.  Specific examples, volatile organic chemical release and energy use in drying forest resources are included.  Scheduled labs involve field trips.  Students enrolling in the course should have passed at least one course meeting the general requirement for science with lab or application of science.

    General Education Requirements:  Population and Environment

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years.

    Credits: 3
  
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    SFR 457 - Tree Pests and Disease


    Applies concepts of tree disease and its development to their roles in forest dynamics and management.  Relevant characteristics of tree pests are covered.  Concepts are applied to common disease complexes found in Maine and other regions of North America. (Because of overlap SFR 457 and SFR 557 cannot both be taken for degree credit) 

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 or SFR 100

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    SFR 458 - Tree Pests and Disease Lab


    Identification of tree health problems and their management options. Course may include field work during and outside of the course’s scheduled times.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 or SFR 100 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    SFR 498 - Senior Research I


    An original investigation of a problem in Forest Ecosystem Science, under the guidance of a faculty member. Students will select an area of study, perform a literature search and prepare a written study plan for their research.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: Permission and junior standing in Forest Ecosystem Science and Conservation.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    SFR 499 - Senior Research II


    Students will complete the research initiated in SFR 498 and prepare a written final report. The completed project should demonstrate the student’s ability to understand and apply scientific principles in research.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: SFR 498 and senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2

School of Forest Resources - Forestry

  
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    SFR 101 - Introduction to Forest Resources


    A week-long field course designed to introduce students to the forest and its components, its ecology, and its use by society.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement when taken with SFR 111 and SFR 112.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    SFR 102 - Structure and Function of Woody Plants Laboratory


    Introductory concepts on the anatomy and structure of woody plants with an emphasis on the relationship between form and function.

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences  when taken with SFR 100.

    Corequisites: SFR 100 or PSE 100 or BIO 100

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    SFR 103 - Introduction to Forest Resource Professions


    Introduction and overview of global, North American, and Maine forest resources, current and historical use by humans, history of forest regulation and policy, forest stewardship and land ethics, measurement and economics of forest resources, history and development of forest resource professions, and career options and professional societies in forest resources. Course may have field trips during class times.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    SFR 106 - Forest Land Navigation and Outdoor Preparedness


    A hands on, in the field introduction to the basics of forest land navigation for students majoring in natural resources.  Natural resource professionals often work alone or in small teams in remote locations and off trail.  Preparation and planning are the key to safe, successful fieldwork.   The course stresses the use of topographic maps and imagery commonly used by natural resource professionals and how to use them in conjunction with compasses and GPS units.  This course does not cover wilderness first aid.  Lec 1 Lab 3

    Prerequisites: SFR 101 or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
 

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