Jul 03, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Peace Studies

  
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    PAX 491 - Forgiveness: Creating a Culture of Peace and Reconciliation


    How do we forgive those we consider enemies? Are there limits to forgiveness? Can we learn forgiveness? These questions form the core of the class journey as it explores forgiveness from academic, personal, historical and cultural perspectives. Through reading, writing, conversation and other forums, it looks at forgiveness as a tool for peace building.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: PAX 201 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PAX 495 - Advanced Topics in Peace and Reconciliation Studies


    An advanced, interdisciplinary study of topics such as “Peace Education,” “Conflict Resolution in the Schools,” “Diversity Education,” etc. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: PAX 201 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PAX 498 - Special Projects in Peace and Reconciliation Studies


    Advanced individual study, research and written projects in Peace and Reconciliation Studies and related areas, conducted under the guidance of a faculty member associated with the Peace and Reconciliation Studies Program. Arranged on request. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: PAX 201 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-6

Philosophy

  
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    PHI 100 - Contemporary Moral Problems


    Examines a variety of moral problems causing controversy in contemporary society. Focuses on evaluating arguments for and against competing solutions to these problems. Also discusses different philosophical strategies for thinking about moral obligations and relationships. Topics surveyed may include: abortion, affirmative action, euthanasia, feminism, the environment, capital punishment, welfare and aid to the needy, technology, war and racism, among others.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 102 - Introduction to Philosophy


    An introduction to philosophical thought and critical thinking through a reading of works from the philosophical tradition. Readings might include works from philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Descartes, Hume, Locke, Kant, Marx, Nietzche and/or other great works of philosophy. Questions will be asked about the nature of wisdom and knowledge, the essence of reality and of ideas, human nature, virtue and community, justice and political life.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Western Cultural Tradition

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 103 - Methods of Reasoning


    A study of principles used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning including the nature of thought, uses of language, recognition of arguments, informal fallacies, purposes and types of definition, deduction and induction. Emphasis on understanding and mastering through practice some fundamental techniques for testing the soundness of many different kinds of reasoning.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 104 - Existentialism and Literature


    A critical study of philosophical significance of individual choices and actions involving questions of personal identity, responsibility and authenticity as these themes are developed in existentialist literature. Special attention will be given to existentialist literary techniques.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 105 - Introduction to Religious Studies


    An analysis of religion as an expression of human culture past and present. Considers institutional and non-institutional manifestations of religion as conveyed through myth and symbol, religious experience, struggle for societal change, mysticism, and quests for the articulation of human values. Inquiry by various disciplines will be considered, e.g., anthropology, psychology, sociology, history, philosophy, and theology.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 132 - Life, Technology and Evolution


    A philosophical study of the relationship between our evolutionary past, the emergence of cultures and technologies that define our human present, and the sustainability of life given the environmental challenges of the future. Focus will be given to recent ethical and ecological issues in biotechnology, local climate change issues and inter-disciplinary thinking.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 210 - History of Ancient Philosophy


    An analysis of Hellenic philosophy with emphasis on Plato and Aristotle, including Presocratic philosophy, Platonism, Aristotelianism, Stoicism and Epicureanism.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: No first-year students or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 212 - Hegel and 19th Century Philosophy


    A study of the philosophy of Hegel and related 19th Century philosophies that consider the historical and situational character of consciousness and knowledge.  Explores the implications for areas of human existence such as ethics, politics, art, economics, and science.  Additional authors considered may include Kant, Schiller, Nietzsche, and Marx.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 214 - 20th Century Continental Philosophy


    A study of some of the most influential thinkers in 20th Century Continental Philosophy.  Explores themes central to this area of philosophy including the nature of self-identity, our ability to understand ourselves and our motivations, the social and political character of this understanding, and the implications of these themes for our understanding of such areas of human existence as ethics, art, and politics.  Authors considered in the course may include Freud, Sartre, Marcuse, Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida, de Beauvoir, and Judith Butler.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 221 - Classical Chinese Philosophy


    This course provides an introduction to major philosophical schools in the “classical” period of (pre-Qin) China, including Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism.  We will concentrate on early debates over human nature and the best practices of self-cultivation, the general nature of the cosmos and the human role in it, and the proper ordering of society.  We will read not only the original texts by early Chinese philosophers, but also contemporary discussions and developments of their views.  These different philosophical positions greatly influenced later Chinese intellectual and social history, including the development of Buddhism, and shaped cultures and religions in Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia as well. Thus, understanding these early debates is an important stepping-stone for understanding East Asian thought and culture generally.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Ethics

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternating years

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 230 - Ethics


    Readings and discussions of works by Aristotle, Mill, Kant, Nietzsche and other moral philosophers. In each case, the nature of the system, its summum bonum and defense is examined, criticized, and tested for its applicability to personal and public ethical predicaments.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: No first-year students or one course in philosophy.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 231 - Topics in Applied Ethics


     

    Deals with the ethical issues in various professions and practices such as business, law, agriculture, government, science, teaching and journalism. Different sections may focus on specific professions or problem areas (e.g.., Business Ethics, Environmental Ethics, etc..)

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: One course in Philosophy or Sophomore Standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3

  
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    PHI 232 - Environmental Ethics


    A critical survey of major contemporary discussions of human relationships to nature and the causes of the environmental crisis. Topics will include animal rights, biocentrism, deep ecology, ecofeminism, bio-regionalism, social ecology and sustainability. Special attention will be given to building an ethical vocabulary for interpreting the place of humans in relation to the non-human.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Social Contexts and Institutions and Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: No first-year students or one course in philosophy.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 233 - Business Ethics


    Corporations and commerce exert a powerful influence on contemporary societies. Examines ethical and political problems created by a commercial culture and discusses related ethical and political theories. Addresses such questions as: Is the only business of business to make a profit? What ethical obligations should corporations respect? Should business be expected to work for an environmentally sustainable society? Is our commercial culture just? What are the rights of employees and communities? What are the appropriate roles of business and politics in a just society? Case studies provide some real world examples for discussion.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Ethics

    Prerequisites: No first-year students.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 235 - Biomedical Ethics


    Investigates physician, nursing, and hospital codes of conduct, the physician/patient relationship, concepts of health/disease, procreation/abortion decisions, genetics/reproductive technologies, health resources/social justice allocations, medical humanities, ethics in a pandemic, and other ethical dimensions of medical practice.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, or Nursing major, or permission 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 240 - Social and Political Philosophy


    A critical study of major social and political philosophers from Plato to the present in light of their ethical and metaphysical systems. Topics include the problem of justice, the nature of the state and its relationship to other social institutions, and the individual. The primary focus will be on normative rather than descriptive theory.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: No first-year students or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 242 - Ethics in Professional Life


    Examines what it means to be a good professional, with a focus on nursing, social work, and counseling. Explores roles and responsibilities of professionals as viewed through different ethical frameworks. Emphasizes interprofessional relationships and effective teamwork in settings of interagency/interorganization collaboration. Encourages reflection and articulation of personal values and goals, and includes strategies for cultivating key professional virtues while integrating professional ethics with personal moral convictions.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 244 - Philosophy of Law


    Topics include the nature and limits of law, sovereignty and legal duty. Special emphasis on theories of jurisprudence, the relationship between morality and law, the constitutional role of courts, and critical legal studies, including feminism, critical race theory, environmental law and deconstruction.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 250 - Formal Logic


    An introductory course in modern symbolic logic. Techniques of deductive inference, including decision procedures and axiomatization, are studied in developing the propositional and predicative logics. Some attention is given to metalogic and the philosophy of logic.

    General Education Requirements:  Quantitative Literacy and Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: No first-year students.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 287 - Religions and Philosophies of the East: Buddhism


    The religious and philosophical foundations of Buddhism including the basic teachings of the Buddha (Four Noble Truths, Noble Eightfold Path, Dependent Origination, etc.), Buddhist ethics, Buddhist meditation, and some later religious and philosophical developments.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: No first-year students.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 312 - History of Modern Philosophy


    An interpretation of modern philosophy from Bacon and Descartes in the 17th century, developing through 18th century rationalism and empiricism and culminating in the system of Kant.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 317 - Existentialism and Phenomenology


    A critical study of the philosophical significance of individual choices and actions, including questions of personal identity, responsibility, authenticity and the ways in which those aspects of human experience are described. Readings include texts by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and contemporary authors, who conduct existential and phenomenological investigations of race, class and gender.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: At least one course in philosophy, excluding PHI 103.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 332 - Environmental Philosophy


    A focused study of texts, perspectives and issues concerning the philosophy of nature, environmentalism and climate change from historical, cross-cultural and humanities perspectives.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment

    Prerequisites: One Philosophy course or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Alternating years

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 342 - Marxist Philosophy I: The Philosophy of Karl Marx


    Special attention is given to the Marxist theory of knowledge, ethics, political and social philosophy as formulated by Karl Marx in his theory of knowledge, ethics, economics and political philosophy. Additional readings from Friedrich Engels and Mao Zedong.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 344 - Theories of Justice


    A critical study of recent theories of social justice including utilitarian, social contract, entitlement, communitarian, feminist and postmodern approaches, and spanning the political spectrum from libertarianism to socialism. Topics include distribution of wealth and power, affirmative action, censorship and pornography and international justice.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Western Cultural Tradition and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 345 - Global Justice


    A study of moral and political philosophies developed in response to the issues and challenges raised by political, economic, and technological globalization.  These include such topics as sovereignty and self-determination, global institutions and democracy, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, poverty and international or global distributive justice, fair trade, intellectual property rights, global environmental justice, domestic institutions and responsibility for global injustice, human rights and cultural diversity, women and global justice, immigration, war, humanitarian intervention and terrorism.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: One course in Philosophy.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 346 - The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi


    With a major focus on Gandhi’s ethics as the basis of his philosophy and religion, this course uses writings by Gandhi and Gandhi’s scholars to examine his philosophy of truth and nonviolence, nonviolent activism, social and political philosophy, religious philosophy, multiculturalism and unity with a respect for diversity.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: One course in Philosophy.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 360 - Metaphysics


    Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that concerns itself with the fundamental nature of the world.  Questions that metaphysics attempts to answer include: What do we mean when we say something exists? Do any things other than physical objects (numbers, qualities, God, etc.) exist? Why is there anything rather than nothing? What are human beings: material organisms, immaterial souls, or something else?  What makes you the same person as you were ten years ago? Are we really free to choose our actions, or are our actions (even thoughts) predetermined by something else in the world? What is the nature of time and space? Is time travel possible?  

    In this course, we will focus on some of those questions and evaluate arguments for different answers that are proposed by philosophers from different philosophical traditions.  This will not only give us a deep understanding of those metaphysical disputes but also help us approach other branches of philosophy.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition 

    Prerequisites: One Philosophy course or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternating years

    Credits: 3

  
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    PHI 420 - Topics in Recent Continental Philosophy


    A critical study of topics addressed by major movements and thinkers in continental philosophy since the turn of the century. Readings include works by Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty, Levi-Strauss, Derrida, Lacan, Foucault, Habermas and Gadamer.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 431 - Advanced Topics in the Philosophy of Art


    A study of issues relating to the nature of art, its political and cultural significance, and its place in human life.  Readings will be drawn from the history of philosophy and also from art history and art criticism.  In different years, the course could focus on debates in the history of philosophy, on current approaches to art, on a particular artistic theory, or on a specialized theme in the philosophy of art.  This course is valuable both for students in philosophy and for students working in art history or fine art.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 432 - Environmental Justice


    A critical study of historical and multicultural perspectives on environmental justice. This course will focus on environmental intersectionality, the theory that environmental burdens disproportionately affect oppressed social groups. Attention will be given to environmental philosophy, ethics and policy, ranging from local indigenous struggles, to national and global issues.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics, Social Contexts and Institutions, Population and the Environment and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior, senior or graduate standing or PHI 232.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 465 - Advanced Topics in Philosophy


    Individual and small group study of problems or systems of philosophical concern relying on careful use of major philosophical resources, as well as attempts at fresh exploration of fundamental topics. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit when different philosophers or problems are studied.

    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or permission; junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHI 466 - Readings in Philosophy


    Individual study of a selected topic, agreed upon by the student and the instructor. Designed to address advanced issues not covered in normal offerings.

    Prerequisites: 9 hours in philosophy and permission of department and instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    PHI 475 - Junior/Senior Philosophy Seminar


    One semester of study is required for all philosophy majors. Normally offered each semester with topics of study varied depending upon the instructor and student interest. Provides upper-level philosophical study shared by philosophy majors and other students with an interest in advanced philosophical learning.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: 3 courses in philosophy; junior or senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

Physics

  
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    PHY 100 - Introduction to Physics and Astronomy


    Introduces first-year physics and engineering physics students to the professions and opportunities in physics, engineering physics, and astronomy, including departmental faculty, research opportunities, and facilities. In addition to discipline specific information, the course will introduce students to departmental, college, and university resources that will help them succeed in their education.

     (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: First-year standing within the BA or BS in Physics or the BS in Engineering Physics or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1

  
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    PHY 101 - Physics by Inquiry I


    A basic “hands-on” inquiry course. Students make observations in the laboratory which provide a basis for constructing physical concepts and developing the reasoning skills necessary to apply them to simple phenomena. Each semester, two or three topics will be chosen from the following list: properties of matter, observational astronomy, heat and temperature, light and optics (including color), electricity and magnetism and kinematics.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: Education majors or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    PHY 105 - Descriptive Physics


    An introduction to basic concepts of physics intended for the non-science major. Lec w/dem 3, Lab 3.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in Basic or Applied Sciences

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    PHY 107 - Technical Physics I


    An introduction to the basic concepts of mechanics and heat with illustrations taken from technical applications. Algebra and trigonometry are used. Intended for Engineering Technology students. NOTE: Because of overlapping subject matter, no more than four (4) degree credits are allowed for any combination of PHY 107, PHY 111 and PHY 121.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in Basic or Applied Sciences

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    PHY 108 - Technical Physics II


    An introduction to the basic concepts of electricity, magnetism and light with illustrations taken from technical applications. Algebra and trigonometry are used. Intended for Engineering Technology students. NOTE: Because of overlapping subject matter, no more than four (4) degree credits are allowed for any combination of PHY 108, PHY 112 and PHY 122.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: PHY 107

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    PHY 111 - General Physics I


    An introduction to the principles of mechanics, energy, heat, sound and properties of matter. Designed for science majors as well as premedical and predental students. No calculus. A working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required. NOTE: Because of overlapping subject matter, no more than four (4) degree credits are allowed for any combination of PHY 107, PHY 111 and PHY 121.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in Basic or Applied Sciences

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    PHY 112 - General Physics II


    A continuation of PHY 111. Introducing electricity, magnetism, optics and atomic, nuclear, and quantum physics. NOTE: Because of overlapping subject matter, no more than four (4) degree credits are allowed for any combination of PHY 108, PHY 112 and PHY 122.

    General Education Requirements: Lab in Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: PHY 111

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    PHY 121 - Physics for Engineers and Physical Scientists I


    An introductory calculus-based physics course, primarily serving students majoring in engineering or the physical sciences. Treats mechanics and acoustics. NOTE: Because of overlapping subject matter, no more than four (4) degree credits are allowed for any combination of PHY 107, PHY 111 and PHY 121.

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: MAT 126 or concurrently

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    PHY 122 - Physics for Engineers and Physical Scientists II


    A continuation of PHY 121 including electricity, magnetism, and optics. While not required, it is recommended that MAT 127 be taken concurrently with, or prior to PHY 122.  NOTE: Because of overlapping subject matter, no more than four (4) degree credits are allowed for any combination of PHY 108, PHY 112 and PHY 122.

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better  in PHY 121 and a grade of C or better  in MAT 126

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    PHY 200 - Career Preparation in Physics and Engineering Physics I


    A sophomore level course required of all physics and engineering physics majors. An introduction to the professions of physics and engineering physics, including the ethical standards of professional practice. Technical communication skills and practice in working on teams are developed through projects, presentations, and class discussions of contemporary issues and strategies to enhance professional qualifications.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    PHY 223 - Special Relativity


    The basic principles of special relativity with a primary emphasis on mechanics.

    Prerequisites: MAT 126, and a grade of C- or better in either PHY 112 or PHY 122

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    PHY 224 - Special Relativity Laboratory


    Experiments illustrating the major predictions of the Theory of Special Relativity.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in both PHY 261 and PHY 236 or permission of instructor.

    Corequisites: PHY 223

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1 - 3
  
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    PHY 231 - Mathematical Methods in Physics


    Mathematical methods with applications to physics.  Topics include: infinite series, power series, complex numbers, linear algebra, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, vector analysis, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, ordinary and partial different equations. If this course was taken as a topics course in PHY 497, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 228

    Corequisites: MAT 259 or permission of instructor

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHY 236 - Introductory Quantum Physics


    The basic principles of quantum theory, atomic structure, nuclear structure, and some aspects of molecular, solid state, and elementary particle physics.

    Prerequisites: MAT 127,  a grade of C- or better in either PHY 112 or PHY 122

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHY 241 - Computational Physics


    This course is a problem-solving course, developing the ability to solve numerical problems in physics and astronomy using computer programming methods with the Python language. Upon completion of this course, the student will possess the basic knowledge of numerical modeling that may be required for graduate school or in a position at a technical corporation.

     

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in PHY 236

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    PHY 261 - Physical Measurements Laboratory


    Experiments primarily in modern physics. Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: MAT 127,  a grade of C- or better in either PHY 112 or PHY 122

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    PHY 262 - Electronics


    A laboratory-based introduction to analog and digital electronics and to the collaborative design and testing of circuits for a variety of practical applications.  Primarily for physics and engineering physics majors; others admitted by permission.  If this course was taken as a topics course in PHY 497, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: MAT 127, A grade of C- or better in either PHY 112 or PHY 122

    Corequisites: PHY 231

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    PHY 364 - Modern Experimental Physics


    Experiments selected from various topics in physics including x-ray diffraction, microwaves, nuclear magnetic resonance, Hall effect, etc.  Students develop their own experimental methods.  Normally taken by junior physics and engineering physics majors. 

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Requirement.

    Prerequisites: MAT 228  and a grade of C- or better in PHY 236

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    PHY 365 - Mechanics Laboratory


    Theories and practices in the measurement of physical quantities in mechanics.  Primarily for physics and engineering physics majors; others admitted by permission.  

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Requirement.

    Prerequisites: MAT 259 and a grade of C- or better in PHY 451

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    PHY 400 - Career Preparation in Physics and Engineering Physics II


    A senior level course required of all physics and engineering physics majors. Refinement of technical communication skills through projects, presentations and class discussions of contemporary issues in science and engineering and strategies for career enhancement after graduation.

    General Education Requirements: Together with PHY 481 or PHY 482, this course Satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in PHY 200; senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    PHY 447 - Molecular Biophysics


    An introduction to physical properties of biological macromolecules including proteins, nucleic acids and membranes. Solution thermodynamics developed as needed. Some statistical mechanics introduced. Topics include macromolecular structure, dynamics and functions, inter- and intra-molecular interactions, ligand binding equilibria, helix-coil transitions, physical techniques used in biophysics such as calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Four credit version contains additional term project to be arranged with instructor.

    Prerequisites: MAT 126, CHY 121, and a grade of C- or better in either PHY 112 or PHY 122 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3 - 4
  
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    PHY 451 - Mechanics


    A detailed treatment of mechanics using Newtonian and Lagrangian methods.  Newton’s laws, particle motion in a plane, linear oscillations, damped oscillations, coupled oscillators, rigid body rotation, and potential methods.

    Prerequisites: A Grade of C- or better in PHY 231

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHY 454 - Electricity and Magnetism I


    An intermediate level course in the fundamentals of the theory of electricity and magnetism. Treats electrostatics and magnetostatics, both in vacuum and in matter. Rec 3.

    Prerequisites: A grade of  C- or better in either PHY 112 or PHY 122 and in PHY 231

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHY 455 - Electricity and Magnetism II


    A continuation of PHY 454. Treats electrodynamics by developing Maxwell’s equations and applying them to systems of general interest. Rec 3.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in PHY 454.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHY 463 - Statistical Mechanics


    Introduces statistical mechanics and thermodynamics with examples chosen from magnetic systems, ideal gases, metals, superfluidity, chemical reactions, phase transformations, mixtures, semiconductors, kinetic theory or related topics. Normally taken as a junior or senior elective by students in the sciences or engineering. Rec 3.

    Prerequisites: MAT 258 or MAT 259 and a grade of C- or better in PHY 236.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHY 469 - Quantum and Atomic Physics


    Basic principles of quantum mechanics. Exploration of canonical systems and the postulates of quantum mechanics using Dirac, vector-matrix, and wavefunction notations.  Analysis of spin, energy, position, and momentum eigenstates, both time independent and time dependent, for several bound and scattering state systems.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in both PHY 231 and PHY 236

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    PHY 470 - Nuclear Physics


    Properties of the nucleus, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay, nuclear models, nuclear reactors and nuclear health physics. May be taken without the laboratory, PHY 471.

    Prerequisites: MAT 259 and a grade of C- or better in PHY 236

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    PHY 471 - Nuclear Physics Laboratory


    Laboratory exercises to accompany PHY 470. Lab 2.

    Corequisites: PHY 470

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHY 472 - Geometrical and Fourier Optics


    Covers geometrical optics, refraction and reflection at plane and spherical surfaces, optical instruments; Fourier optics, interference of waves and diffraction by a single and a double aperture; Lasers - theory of their operation, mode locking and pulse formation. Rec 3.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in either PHY 112 or PHY 122.

    Corequisites: MAT 228

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHY 480 - Physics of Materials


     An Introductory courses in the physics of materials, primarily solid state physics. The structural, mechanical, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of materials are discussed. This course is appropriate for upper level undergraduates and graduate students in the field of physical sciences and engineering. The topics will build upon and utilize concepts from materials science, quantum physics, mechanics, and electricity and magnetism.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in both PHY 231 and PHY 236

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHY 481 - Project Laboratory in Physics I


    An individual project laboratory tailored to the student’s particular interests. In consultation with a faculty sponsor, each student is expected to develop a suitable project, approved by the sponsor and the course coordinator. The project may or may not be related to the sponsor’s research. Full written reports are required.

    General Education Requirements: Together with PHY 400, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement.

    Prerequisites: Open to Physics or Engineering Physics majors with senior standing; others by permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHY 482 - Project Laboratory in Physics II


    Completion of the project begun in PHY 481.

    General Education Requirements: Together with PHY 400, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in PHY 481

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHY 495 - Engineering Physics Practice


    Supervised engineering practice in an industrial setting. Placement is off-campus and usually of several month’s duration. Prior approval of department chairperson is required.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing with successful completion of 16 hours of physics courses and a declared major in Engineering Physics.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6
  
  •  

    PHY 496 - Field Experience in Physics


    Supervised research or development in an academic laboratory, government laboratory, or industrial environment. Placements are usually off-campus and of several month’s duration. Prior approval of the department chairman is required.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing with successful completion of 16 hours of physics courses and a declared major in Engineering Physics.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-6
  
  •  

    PHY 497 - Topics in Physics


    Selected topics in areas not already covered by regular course offerings in the department. Primarily for undergraduates.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar
  
  •  

    PHY 499 - Problems in Physics


    A thesis project primarily for undergraduates and ordinarily of an experimental nature.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

Plant, Soil and Environmental Sciences

  
  •  

    PSE 100 - Plant Science


    Basics of plant anatomy, morphology, ecology, physiology and taxonomy with examples drawn from common agricultural and horticultural plants are discussed. Labs include hands-on investigations of local plants. Lec 3, Lab 2.  Course may include field trips during class hours.

    General Education Requirements:  Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PSE 101 - Cropping Systems


    An introduction to agronomic and horticultural cropping systems using local, regional, national and global examples. Lec. 3

    Prerequisites: PSE 100 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 105 - Principles of Sustainable Agriculture


    Basic design principles and examples of environmentally and economically sustainable agricultural systems. Describes the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, but emphasis will be placed on identifying management practices that a) biologically improve soil structure, organic matter content, and fertility; and b) minimize or eliminate the need for chemical interventions for control of insect pests, pathogens, and weeds. Rec 3.

    General Education Requirements:  Application of Scientific Knowledge and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 110 - Introduction to Horticulture


    Students will understand the science of growing plants.  They will apply botany and soil science to produce horticulture crops.  Students will work independently on hands-on projects to apply basic science principles in order to understand horticultural concepts including fruit and leaf morphology, seed germination, and plant growth.

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 121 - Human Societies, Soil and Water: The Unbreakable Link


    Considers the soil and water resources upon which human societies depend. Begins with a survey of basic properties and processes important in understanding soil and water resources. Ethical approaches to resource decision-making are introduced and used. Through the use of many case studies and examples, students are encouraged to clarify and develop their own personal values with respect to human use of the environment. Lec 3.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 203 - Weed Biology and Identification


    This course offers students an introduction to the characteristics and strategies of weedy and invasive plants, followed by study of weed communities in turf and urban landscapes, roadsides and waste areas, and agricultural fields.  Students will learn to identify, in the field, approximately seventy-five weedy plant species and will know the principle weedy traits and/or strategies for each species. Course may include field trips during class hours.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 210 - Digital Landscape Graphics


    An introduction to 2D/3D computer-aided design (CAD) with a focus on landscape design using Vectorworks Landmark.  Exercises relevant to landscape design and horticulture fields include topography manipulation, plan graphics, construction documentation, site modeling, and use of the software’s construction schedules and plant libraries.

    Prerequisites: ENH majors or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Odd Years

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PSE 215 - Vegetable and Fruit Production


    The course will provide students with a practical introduction to growing vegetable and fruit crops of local importance with an emphasis on organic and sustainable production systems. Lectures will focus on particular species, or group of related species, and will include information on cultivar selection, field preparation, fertility and pest management, cultural practices, and harvesting. This course may include off campus field trips during class hours.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or PSE 100 or SFR 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 216 - UMaine Greens Practicum


    UMaine Greens Practicum offers students a hands-on opportunity to manage a small agricultural enterprise focused on greenhouse production of salad greens, and possibly other crops. Classroom activities include a weekly discussion featuring topics related to heated and high-tunnel greenhouse production, food safety, and production economics. Students are responsible for coordinating all activities related to the planting, harvest, delivery, billing, and financial management of the UMaine Greens enterprise.

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    PSE 219 - SL: Herbaceous Landscape Plants


    The study of fundamental principles and practices of identifying, growing and using perennial and annual herbaceous ornamental plants in the landscape.  Students will work with Cooperative Extension and Penobscot County Master Gardeners to manage herbaceous plant gardens that serve the community for education and demonstration.  Students will participate in extensive outdoor labs and may participate in field trips.  This course has been designated as an UMaine service-learning course. Course may include field trips during class hours.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in PSE 100 or BIO 200 or SFR 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 221 - Woody Landscape Plants


    The study of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines, and groundcovers for use in the New England landscape; including identification skills, culture, and function in the landscape.  Extensive outdoor labs.  Lec 3, Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in PSE 100 or BIO 200 or SFR 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PSE 224 - Site Analysis, Grading and Drainage


    An introduction to the landscape design site planning process, this course introduces students to reading the landscape in topographic map form and the principles of site manipulation to control hydrological function.  Topics and exercises include recognizing existing site hydrology, directing surface water flow around structures and through subsurface systems, layout and grading for circulation, calculating cut and fill, retaining wall design and slope design.  Course may include field trips outside of class on weekdays.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better  in PSE 100 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 227 - Landscape Design I


    The first Landscape Design course in a series of two. An introduction to fundamental principles and practices of landscape design including hand graphics techniques, design process, design composition, development of space, hardscape construction materials and basic planting design.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PSE 260 - Pesticide Applicator Certification


    Prepares students for careers in horticulture, agriculture, forestry, and biological sciences in which pesticides are applied.  Students must pass two written exams and are expected to obtain a private applicator license for the state of Maine.  Students who enroll for a second semester must pass two commodity exams to earn another credit for the course.

     

    Prerequisites: BTY-BS Major or EES-BS Major or ENV-BS Major or FTY-BS Major or SAG-BS Major or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    PSE 305 - Problems in Plant, Soil and Environmental Sciences


    Opportunity is provided for specialization in specific areas of plant, soil and environmental sciences.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 0-16
  
  •  

    PSE 312 - Sustainable Food Systems: Challenges and Opportunities


    Students will read about, and discuss various aspects of our food system:  what makes up a food system, how agriculture influences a food system, agricultural history, agricultural efficiencies, threats to a sustainable food system, genetic engineering, and human values and food.

    Prerequisites: PSE 105 or permission

     

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    PSE 320 - Soil Organic Matter Management


    Fundamental aspects of soil organic matter management. Principles of plant residue decomposition, tillage, use of organic soil amendments and environmental and agricultural implications of human soil management. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BMB 207 or CHY 121 and EES 140.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 325 - Turf and Grounds Management


    Investigation of the science and practice of turf and grounds management in residential, commercial, and public landscapes.  Topics include grass biology and identification, lawn establishment, turfgrass maintenance, site analysis and improvement, designing for effective maintenance, mulching and weed control, plant responses to pruning, and the ecological tension between native and managed landscapes.  Lab activities will be conducted within the campus landscape.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better is required in PSE 100 or BIO 200 or SFR 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 328 - Landscape Design II


    The second Landscape Design course in a series of two, this is a project-intensive course focusing on the culmination of previous course instruction where students produce multiple residential landscape plans with all supporting documentation.  Students will have hands-on opportunity to produce plans for real residential sites.  Layout plans and advanced planting design will be introduced.  Students are expected to integrate course knowledge in soils, site analysis, grading, drainage, hand drawn and CAD landscape graphics, landscape construction materials and details, woody and herbaceous plant material, and cost estimating schedules to supplement construction documentation.  Course may include field trips outside of class on weekdays.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better  in PSE 210 and PSE 219 and PSE 221 and PSE 227

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PSE 396 - Field Experience in Plant, Soil and Environmental Sciences


    An approved program of work experience which contributes to the academic major and for which academic credit is given. Students may work part time or full time for a semester in a job related to their professional career goals, including on-farm internships.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only)

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1 - 16

  
  •  

    PSE 403 - Weed Ecology and Management


    Ecological principles and their application in non-chemical and reduced input weed management strategies. Course may include field trips during class hours. Lec 2, Lab 2.  PSE 403 and PSE 513 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or PSE 100 or SFR 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 410 - Plant Propagation


    Principles and methods involved in the propagation of herbaceous and woody plants by seeds, division, layering, cutting, budding, grafting, and tissue culture.  Lec 3, Lab 3. 

    EES 140 is recommended.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in PSE 100 or BIO 200 or SFR 100, and Junior standing. 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSE 415 - Greenhouse Management


    The study of greenhouse management practices and principles. Specific areas of study will include greenhouse structure, operation, and the use of greenhouses for ornamental plant production. Extensive greenhouse work.  Lec 3, Lab 2. Course may include field trips during class hours. EES 140 is recommended.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in PSE 100 or BIO 200 or SFR 100, and Junior standing. 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PSE 424 - Nursery Management


    Covers the basic systems and methods for production of nursery corps, including container and field production, quality control, substrate management, irrigation, pest and diseases, financial considerations, retail and wholesale operations, selling and shipping nursery stock, overwintering, and the relationship between nursery and landscape industries.  Extensive outdoor labs include work on campus.  Course may include field trips on weekends.  Lec 2, Lab 2.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and a grade of C- or better in PSE 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 425 - Landscape Management


    Designed to provide students with the opportunity to bring together all aspects of theoretical and applied training.  Students develop an understanding of professional practice in landscape management, business management, project management and group collaboration.  Accomplished through interacting with a variety of professionals, field trips and real life hands-on projects.  Lec 2, Lab 2.  Course may include field trips outside of class time on weekdays.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in PSE 203 or PSE 221 or PSE 325 or PSE 403

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 430 - Environmental Horticulture


    Integrates previously covered topics with new information using class discussion, lectures, student papers, presentations and hands-on projects.  Some of the topics covered include: soil management for sustaining organic matter and preventing erosion, reducing water use in the managed landscape, incorporating native plants into agricultural and horticultural systems, eliminating invasive plants from the home and farm landscape, and creation/protection of wildlife habitat in the managed land/farmscape.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone

    Prerequisites: Senior Standing in Environmental Horticulture or Sustainable Agriculture.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PSE 440 - Environmental Soil Chemistry and Plant Nutrition


    A study of the origin and nature of soil chemical properties and how they influence plant growth and environmental quality.  The cycling of nutrients and carbon through soils, the biosphere, the hydrosphere, and the atmosphere is discussed.  The impacts of human practices such as fertilization, mining, fossil fuel consumption, irrigation, and waste disposal on the quality of soils in both managed and natural systems are considered.

    Prerequisites: BMB 208 or CHY 122 and EES 140.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
 

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