Aug 14, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Naval Science

  
  •  

    NAV 411 - Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare


    Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare:  [Replaces NAV 410: Amphibious Warfare] Broad aspects of warfare and their interactions with maneuver warfare doctrine.  Focus on the United States Marine Corps as the premier maneuver warfare fighting institution.  Historical influences on current tactical, operational, and strategic implications of maneuver warfare practices.  Case studies.  Enrollment preference to NROTC students.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

New Media

  
  •  

    NMD 100 - Introduction to New Media


    NMD 100 explores the concepts that define new media, what new media are, how they are produced, who produces them, and why they challenge how we think, act, create, and relate to other people. We will explore the impact and disruptive effect emerging technologies have on society and institutions by studying both past and present technological developments. The course examines the benefits emerging technologies afford to individuals, organizations, and society; we will consider the challenges and consequences of society’s rapid embrace of these emerging technologies, including the need to raise user awareness of increasing privacy and security concerns. Lecture and Discussion format with hands-on laboratory.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 104 - New Media Design


    Essential tools for graphic design in the digital era.  From simple techniques such as creating shapes and type of more advanced tasks such as masks, gradients, and special effects.  Hands-on projects to produce common products of graphic design; from logos, infographics, and posters to designs for laser cutter and the Web.  Exposure to history, aesthetics, and ethical questions of graphic design in the Internet era, from Bauhaus color theory to memes based Photoshopped images.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 105 - Creative Coding I


    Introduction to programming as a new media art and design practice.  Use of creative processes in programming by writing code to generate images, sound, animations, text, and interactivity.  Use of computing environments such as processing for creating and developing software “sketches” that allow visual expression.  Understand and control how data is represented in computers (data types and structures), instruct computer how make decisions on the fly (conditionals), how and when to repeat instructions (loops), and structure and organize computer code (functions and objects).

    Prerequisites: New Media  Major or Minor or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 106 - Time-Based Media


    Introduction to principles and practice of video and audio production.  Students learn how to publish media and other course projects online as part of their New Media Portfolio Application of the computer as a tool for the development of both expressive and professional time-based media and audiovisual storytelling and as a venue for publishing and distributing creative work online. 

    Prerequisites: New Media  Major or Minor or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 160 - Creative Programming


    In this course, students will learn to use a creative process in programming a computer by developing code to generate images and sound, produce animations, manipulate text, and make media that respond interactively to user input.  The class will use computing programs such as Processing, an artist-designed programming language designed for visual and interactive applications, as a basis for creating and developing software “sketches” that allow visual expression.  Another environment introduced with be Pd (“pure data”, an open source version of Max/MSP), which is a visual programming language.  Pd enables musicians, visual artists, performers, researchers, and developers to create software graphically, without writing lines of code.  In the process, students will learn basic programming skills, including understanding and controlling how data is represented in computers (data types and structures), telling the computer how to make decisions on the fly (conditionals), how and when to repeat instructions (loops), structuring and organizing computer code (functions and objects), and techniques for debugging code.

    This course is designed particularly for students in New Media, Arts, Music, Humanities, and Social Sciences interested in understanding better how computers work and in learning to create their own digital media, through students of all backgrounds are welcome.  The course assumes basic high school math and no technical background. 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    NMD 200 - Designing Humane Tech


    Examines the goals and impacts of New Media technologies.  Topics include how design choices respond to and influence our bodies, our communities, and our political, economic and ecological systems.  Focus on how humane design choices enable us to create a healthier and more sustainable world.  A writing intensive class with reading, discussion, writing assignments and conceptual design projects.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 206 - Project Design Workshop I


    Explores creativity and problem solving using tools, techniques and tactics of new media.  Identifies critical social, economic, cultural and ecological problems in neighborhoods and communities.  Draws on creative skills and playful impulses to design and build solutions using new media strategies.  An ecologically mindful, whole systems approach is adopted, seeking out interdisciplinary partners across campus and community to achieve solutions.  Individual, peer, and team generated projects are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: NMD 200

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 211 - Creative Coding II


     

    Students are provided an introduction to and overview of new media and emerging technologies, interaction design, and software development. Topics covered include social networking, mobile computing, and physical computing.  Students develop skills in research, group collaboration, brainstorming practices, concept development, and rapid project prototyping.

    Prerequisites: NMD 105

    Corequisites: NMD 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    NMD 212 - Rapid Prototyping


    Basic analog and digital electronics, laser cutting and 3D Printing techniques as they apply to New Media art and design framework.  Taught via a studio lab format.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 245 - Film Criticism and Theory


    Students will develop skills in the analysis of form and content so that they will achieve proficiency in the use of film studies vocabulary. Participants will learn to think critically about the media industry and to evaluate film as an art form, individual psychological experience, technology, social text, and commodity. (CMJ 245 and NMD 245 are identical courses.)

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 250 - Electronic Music Composition I: Item and Arrangement


    Designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore the ideas and techniques of audio composition with recorded media.  Item and Arrangement refers to the style of composition that creatively places recorded sounds in a fixed timeline.  Starting with Musique Concrete in the late 1940’s, this technique continues today as a foundation for many contemporary and popular forms, including acoustic ecology and hip-hop.  Students can expect to learn how to work with sound in the digital environment including fundamentals in field recording technique, waveform editing, filtering and digital processing.  Students will be expected to regularly produce and discuss work in relation to the theoretical history of Electronic Music.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 251 - Electronic Music Composition II: Composing a Process


    A companion of NMD 250.  Offers an introduction to creating Electronic Music, and electronic art in general, in the form of a process rather than as a fixed object.  From John Cage through Conceptualism, viewing art-making as “composing a process” is central to much contemporary art, particularly in New Media.  Students will be introduced to compositional methods such as indeterminacy, algorithmic composition, systems analysis and interactivity as well as fundamentals of digital audio synthesis and composing in the Max/MSP environment.  Students will be expected to regularly produce and discuss work in relation to the theoretical history of Electronic Music.

     

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    NMD 295 - Topics in New Media


    Topics not regularly covered in other new media courses. Content varies to suit current needs. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: New Media Majors or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    NMD 306 - Community Collaboration and Development


    New Media project design, with emphasis on team-based research and development.  Requires students to think across a variety of platforms, from analog tools to stand alone devices to online applications. Students will be challenged to think creatively and rigorously about the objective, structure, and form of a community client project; the work of each team will culminate in a new media proposal and/or prototype, preparing them for the New Media capstone sequence.

    Prerequisites: NMD 200 and NMD 211 and NMD 341 or NMD 342 or NMD 343 or NMD 344 or NMD 345 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 324 - Introduction to Narrative Film Making


    The first part in a two-semester course in the process, theory, practice and problems of digital filmmaking. Through the examination of films, narrative fiction and the completion of out-of-class assignments, students will gain insight into the realm of digital filmmaking. Structured as both an academic and “hands-on” approach to the language, method and theory of digital filmmaking through applied concepts and process. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 341 - Documentary Photography and Storytelling


    An overview of photojournalism history, theory and ethics. Exercises teach skills and strategies used by newspaper, magazine and on-line photographers and editors and  challenge students to deal responsibly with issues of invasion of privacy, subject representation, copyright and fair use and image manipulation.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 342 - Interaction Design and Physical Computing


    Interaction Design and Physical Computing will explore opportunities for physical interaction with our environment.  The course focuses on materials and methods used within interaction design to combine hardware, software and physical materials into working prototypes.  Students will learn fundamentals of physical computing to design and build interactive objects and environments using sensors, actuators and microcontrollers.

    Prerequisites: NMD 211 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 343 - SL: Digital Narrative Workshop I


    Explores emerging forms of digital storytelling and how these new forms transform authorship, audience, interaction and publishing. Students produce their own original narratives using digital storytelling techniques, web based media, and non-linear game-like environments. Team projects and skill sharing encouraged. Field work outside the classroom and publication of a storytelling project for community partners. This course has been designated as a  UMaine service-learning course.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expressions. 

    Prerequisites: NMD 200 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 344 - Time-Based Art and Design I


    An introduction in the concepts, process, methods, principles and theories posed by digital video, animation, and audio. Students investigate unique problems in design and production presented by time-based media as well as apply the aesthetic and design principles in the creation of artistic, expressive and/or conceptual structures in time-based media.

    Prerequisites: NMD 104 and NMD 106 or permission 

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 345 - Web Applications


    This class trains students in creating compelling Web designs and interactive Web pages using advanced HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.  Although the focus will be designing and scripting for the Web, the class will apply these easy-to-learn techniques to other contexts, such as bookmarklets and browser extensions.  In addition to this practical know-how, students in this class learn today’s legal and cultural context for sharing, and prototype a creative application of their own choosing.

    Prerequisites: NMD 200 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 347 - Artificial Intelligence for Art and Design


    Introduction to techniques, historical contexts, and conceptual approaches to artificial intelligence as a creative medium.  Cognitive science debate on theories of the mind impacts of AI on society as intellectual labor is replaced by algorithms, and the divide between autonomy and authorship in working with AI for artmaking.  Introduction to different movements and techniques within AI, such as cybernetics, artificial life, nouvelle AI, expressive AI, neural networks, genetic algorithms, machine learning, and deep learning. Students directly apply understanding in creating original works using different approaches.

    Prerequisites: NMD 200 and NMD 211

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 358 - Documentary Film Criticism and Theory


    Centered around the Camden International Film Festival, this course engages students in critically assessing documentary films through an understanding of the genre’s history, theoretical foundations, and means of production, aspects particularly relevant in this age of rapidly evolving media.  Students will be exposed to various new technologies during the festival on the development, production and distribution of contemporary non-fiction film.  Besides periodic class meetings across the semester and four days attendance at the Festival, students will have opportunities to discuss documentaries in public forums and meetings with documentary professionals in seminar conferences.  Students will develop in-depth research projects, either developing their own documentaries or writing analytic papers on issues core to the field. If this course was taken under as a topics course in NMD 398, it cannot be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 370 - 3D Modeling and Animation


    An introduction to the concepts and tools of 3D modeling and animation on the computer. Includes techniques to create narratives and provides hands-on experience with appropriate hardware and software.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 398 - Topics in New Media


    Topics not regularly covered in other new media courses. Content varies to suit current needs. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Department consent.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    NMD 424 - Narrative Film Making


    The second part in a two-semester course in the process, theory, practice and problems of digital filmmaking.  Concentrates on practical experience.  Students will learn the cinematic process through direct development and production of short subject digital films.  Structured as both an academic and “hands-on” approach to the language, method and theory of digital filmmaking.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: NMD 324 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 430 - Topics in New Media


    An exploration of intermediate and advanced topics in multimedia production and design, including, among others, digital video production, software and hardware design or, electronic publishing. Designed to provide students with a deeper and more sophisticated experience with a multimedia issue, tool, or skill–or combination of all three.

    Prerequisites: Department consent.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    NMD 440 - Video Projection Mapping


    Students learn to use video projection to creative immersive environments that wrap 2D video onto 3D surfaces as a New Media tool for exploring digital storytelling, data visualization and site specific multimedia installations.  Course is taught via a studio lab format.

    Prerequisites: NMD 200 and NMD 211

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 441 - Documentary Video and Storytelling


    Provides the essential skills, concepts and processes used by documentary still photographers and audio producers to create professional quality digital mixed media products for the Internet and other interactive media.

    Prerequisites:  NMD 341 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 442 - User Experience Design


    This is a course that explores major concepts in designing the User Experience (UX).  UX Design plays a critical role in the successes and effectiveness of any product, application and service.  It’s just not enough to have technologically advanced and aesthetically appealing products, applications and services - it is critical that they deliver a good user experience to their end users.

    In order to understand the foundations of UX Design, this course will provide a comprehensive overview of the user experience design process and is intended to familiarize students with the methods, concepts, and techniques necessary to make user experience design an integral part of developing effective interactions.  The course provides students with an opportunity to acquire the resources, skills, and hands-on experience they need to design, develop, and evaluate information interfaces from a user-centered design perspective. 

    Prerequisites: NMD 211 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    NMD 443 - Digital Narrative Workshop II


    Students explore interactive authorship, seek audience participation, develop interactive environments, and publish final pieces in an online magazine.  Exploration and reflection on larger cultural metanarratives, many of which are in the process of transition.  Students may continue community partnerships begun in Digital Narrative I, and further develop their projects in reach or in depth.  They may also seek alternative ways of either crafting or publishing and sharing community stories, such as through Virtual Museums, Community Archives, Social Media campaigns, or Storytelling peer-to-peer workshops.  Final projects will culminate in online publication and/or a community/public audience engagement.

    Prerequisites: NMD 343

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 444 - Time-Based Art and Design II


    Advanced level exploration of the principles of design and the creative process relative to time-based media.  Focus is on the design of imaginative, and/or metaphorical structures combining text, image and sound into self-contained digital works.  Students experiment with the transmission of creative and expressive information through sequential and time-based formats, including fixed-image sequence, digital video, and animations.

    Prerequisites: NMD 344

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 445 - Mobile Applications


    Mobile applications have become one of the predominant ways that people interact with each other.  Yet designing and developing apps for phones and tables typically requires a mastery of a half-dozen languages and platforms.  This course, by contrast, builds on familiar Web design and development skills taught in NMD 345, Web Applications, to produce a working app for common mobile platforms such as iOS and Android by using a full-stack approach.  Students conceive and produce an app that interchanges data with the cloud to offer access to new information or connect people in new ways.

    Prerequisites: NMD 345

    Course Typically Offered: Every Year

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 446 - Advanced Rapid Protoyping


    Intermediate and advanced exploration of laser cutting, 3D printing and CNC milling as students apply to New Media art and design frameworks. Course is taught via a studio lab format.

    Prerequisites: NMD 212

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 490 - Independent Study in New Media


    Topics not regularly covered in other courses. Content varies to suit current needs. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 498 - New Media Capstone I


    In this first semester of a two-part course, students conceive and build a complex, self-determined new media project.  Students are expected to bring an ambitious yet feasible idea to the course.  The first semester emphasizes extensive research, writing, and in-class presentations, followed by a series of working prototypes developed in an iterative fashion.  This semester fulfills the Writing Intensive general education requirement.  High levels of maturity, creativity, self-discipline and personal organization are expected.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive requirement. Together with NMD 499, this course also satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirements.

    Prerequisites: Senior Standing and a grade of C- or better in NMD 306.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NMD 499 - New Media Capstone II


    In this second semester of a two-part course, students expand and refine the prototype developed in the first semester.  After students test their applications in class and with an outside target audience, the course culminates in a final presentation at year’s end.  High levels of maturity, creativity, self-discipline and personal organization are expected.

    General Education Requirements: Together with NMD 498, this course satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience requirement.

    Prerequisites: NMD 498.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

Nursing

  
  •  

    NUR 101 - Issues and Opportunities in Nursing


    Introduces first-year Nursing students to issues in nursing education and University resources. Assists with the development of writing and critical thinking skills. Seeks to enhance cultural growth and understanding and to influence the establishment of self-care and wellness as a priority for nursing students. Discussion of legal and ethical aspects and professional organizations in nursing. Students meet clinical faculty in order to explore their education and experiences in nursing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    NUR 102 - Foundations of Nursing Practice I


    This course is designed to introduce students to professional nursing practice.  Offers students the opportunity to apply nursing concepts and attitudes in a collaborative, classroom setting.  Students will develop nursing strategies to explore patient centered care, safety, comfort, and communication that will meet the selected Maine nurse core competencies.  Guiding course principles include foundations of the nursing profession, quality and safety towards delivering evidence-based healthcare.  This course will meet the learning objectives as it relates to Quantitative Literacy by significant application of math skills required to provide safe patient are in assessment, interventions, data analysis, medication administration and measurable patient evaluation/outcomes.

    General Education Requirements: Students can satisfy three credits of the General Education Quantitative Literacy requirement by successfully completing NUR 102, NUR 201 and NUR 302.

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major; minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, and a minimum grade of C or better in BIO 100 and NUR 101

    Corequisites: NUR 106

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1.5
  
  •  

    NUR 103 - Foundations of Nursing Practice II


    Along with NUR 101 and NUR 102, this foundational nursing course introduces students to nursing theory, the nursing process, ethical principles, the nurse’s role in advocacy, health policy, quality improvement and self-care.  In addition, the course also expands on patient-centered care, evidence-based practice, communication and collaboration among inter-professional teams, and the use of informatics.  Global health issues and their impact on nursing practice as well as the future of nursing practice will be covered.

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major; minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, and a minimum grade of C or better in BIO 100 and NUR 101

    Corequisites: BIO 208

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 106 - Foundations of Nursing Practice I LAB


    This course is designed to introduce fundamentals of nursing practice by applying an evidence-based approach within a laboratory learning environment. Students will develop foundational nursing skills for clinical practice to promote quality-based patient care that aligns with selected core competencies. Essential medication delivery mechanisms and mathematics will be emphasized

    Course Note:  A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 is required.

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major, minimum grade of C in either BIO 100, or both BMB 207 and BMB 209. Completion of at least one semester of the nursing program of study. 

    Corequisites: NUR 102

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    NUR 165 - Introduction to Care of the Older Adult


    This course provides a foundation of essential knowledge, skills and attitudes in the provision of care to older adults.  The content focuses on aging as a normal development process and includes analysis of issues confronting this population.  The course focuses on older adults as vibrant and essential members of society with an emphasis on the health professionals’ role in promoting older adult wellness and health.   Key recommendations and evidence-based practice from leading geriatric organizations are embedded into
    the course.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    NUR 200 - Care of Adults I


    This course introduces nursing concepts necessary for novice care of adult clients with selected illness and disease conditions, with the use of the nursing process to promote health and healing.  Students apply pathophysiology and health assessment principles to focus nursing assessment and care planning to implement care and evaluate outcomes. Patient-centered care, safety, teamwork and collaboration, and evidence-based practice are highlighted through case studies, active learning tasks, lecture, and discussion.

    NOTE: students must have a cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0

    Prerequisites: Nursing major. Overall cumulative GPA of a 3.0; cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0;  Minimum grade of C in BIO 100, BIO 208, BMB 207, BMB 209, BMB 240, BMB 241 and MAT 111.

    Corequisites: NUR 202, 265, 300 and 303

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    NUR 201 - Care of Adults I Clinical


    This course introduces the student to the professional nursing role in direct care learning experiences. Students will build on knowledge, skills and attitudes gained from the science and humanities, previous and concurrent nursing courses in the provision of professional nursing care to adults. This clinical experience will provide students with the opportunities to apply theoretical knowledge, critical thinking, and basic nursing skills when implementing safe patient care.

    NOTE: Note: Nursing Major. Overall cumulative GPA 3.0 and cumulative lab/science GPA of 3.0 Minimum grade of “C” in BIO 100, BMB, 207, BMB 209, BIO 208, BMB 241/240 and MAT 111.

    General Education Requirements: Together with NUR102 & NUR 302, this course satisfies 3 credits of the General Education Quantitative Literacy requirement for Nursing majors only.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Corequisites: NUR 200, NUR 202, NUR 265, NUR 300 and NUR 303

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1.5

  
  •  

    NUR 202 - Application of Theory to Nursing Practice I


    This course prepares students to provide holistic evidence-based nursing care through laboratory learning experiences.  Students will develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to meet selected core competencies for safe patient care.  Lab: 2

     

    NOTE: students must have a cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major with an overall cumulative GPA of 3.0 and cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0; minimum grade of C in BIO 100, BIO 208, BMB 207, BMB 209, BMB 240, BMB 241 and MAT 111.

    Corequisites: NUR 200, NUR 265, NUR 300 and NUR 303

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Summer

    Credits: 1.5

  
  •  

    NUR 265 - Human Genetics and Genomics for Nursing Practice


    Genomic applications have become increasingly more relevant to the delivery of healthcare across all health settings. This course introduces students to genetic/genomics information in various applications within healthcare. Students are provided an overview of genomic concepts that relate to caring for persons, families, communities, and/or populations throughout the lifespan. Students will acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to meet selected core competencies outlined in the Essentials of Genetic and Genomic Nursing: Competencies, Curricula Guidelines and Outcome Indicators, 2nd edition. Special emphasis will be given to current events that utilize clinical guidelines and follow evidence-based practice.

    Prerequisites: C or higher in BIO 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    NUR 300 - Health Assessment Through the Lifespan


    Develops the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct an individual assessment. Emphasis on data collection through the development of communication, interviewing, history-taking and physical examination skills. Lec 3, Lab 3.

    NOTE: students must have a cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major; Overall cumulative GPA 3.0; cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0; Minimum grade of C in BIO 100, BIO 208, BMB 207, BMB 209, BMB 240, BMB 241, CHF 201 and MAT 111. 

    Corequisites: NUR 308

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    NUR 301 - Care of Adults II


    This course builds on the knowledge, skills and attitudes mastered in all preceding nursing courses, sciences and social sciences.   Students will develop the ability to collaborate with other members of the health care team in providing comprehensive care to adults in a variety of clinical settings.  Concepts of patient-centered care, quality improvement, evidence-based practice, safety, informatics, team-work and collaboration are further developed in the context of care of adults with acute and chronic health problems.

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major; Minimum grade of “C” in NUR 200, NUR 201, NUR 202, NUR 300, NUR 303

    Corequisites: NUR 302,  NUR 316 and NUR 415

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 302 - Application of Theory to Nursing Practice II


    This laboratory based, skill building course prepares students to provide complex patient-centered care of adults with acute and chronic health problems. Students will develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes to meet selected core competencies of safe, high quality, evidence-based patient care. This laboratory course also provides students with the mathematics skills necessary to provide safe patient care.

    General Education Requirements: Students can satisfy three credits of the General Education Quantitative Literacy requirement by successfully completing NUR 102, NUR 201 and NUR 302.

    Prerequisites:  Nursing major, minimum of C in NUR 200, NUR 201, NUR 202, NUR 300, NUR 303

    Corequisites: NUR 301 and  NUR 316

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1.5
  
  •  

    NUR 303 - Pathophysiology


    A study of the physiological, genetic and biochemical basis of disease.

     

    NOTE: students must have a cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major; overall cumulative GPA 3.0; cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0; Minimum grade of C in BIO 100, BIO 208, BMB 207, BMB 209, BMB 240, BMB 241, and MAT 111

    Corequisites: NUR 200, NUR 202, NUR 265 and NUR 300 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    NUR 306 - Care of Adults II Clinical


    This course expands the student’s understanding of the professional nursing role through the direct care of adults with acute and chronic health problems in a variety of clinical settings.  Students continue to use knowledge, skills and attitudes gained from the sciences, humanities, and previous and concurrent nursing courses to provide high quality care that is based on standards of practice and current evidence.  Students apply theoretical knowledge, clinical reasoning and complex nursing skills when implementing safe patient care (six clinical hours per week). 

    Note:   This course is intended for Nursing majors who have a minimum grade of C in NUR 200, NUR 201, NUR 202, NUR 300 and NUR 303. 

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Corequisites: NUR 301, NUR 302, NUR 316, and NUR 415.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    NUR 308 - Health Assessment through the Life Span Lab


    Develops the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct an individual assessment through actual and virtual laboratory activities.  Emphasis on data collection through the development of communication, interviewing, history taking and physical examination skills.

    Course note:  Overall cumulative GPA 3.0; cumulative Lab/Science GPA of 3.0.

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major; minimum grade of C in BIO 100, BIO 208, BMB 207, BMB 209, BMB 240, BMB 241, CHF 201 and MAT 111. 

    Corequisites: NUR 300

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    NUR 310 - Evidence Based Prac Healthcare


    Methods of research and basic concepts to the research process will be introduced. Qualitative and quantitative approaches will be addressed. The student will evaluate research studies and consider the implications of research for nursing practice. Students will gain an appreciation of the role of research in the development of the discipline and profession of nursing. Emphasis will be placed on the role of evidence-based practice in the delivery of high quality, safe patient-centered care.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major with a minimum GPA of 3.0; STS 232 or equivalent, NUR 102 NUR 106 and NUR 103

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 316 - Pharmacology for Nursing Practice


    This course prepares students to apply principles of pharmacotherapeutics in provision of evidence-based nursing interventions. Emphasis is on patient-centered care across the lifespan with special focus on patient safety, the use of health informatics, and on education of patients and their families for optimal health outcomes.

    Prerequisites: Nursing major; minimum grade of C in NUR 200, NUR, 201, NUR 202, NUR 300, and NUR 303

    Corequisites: NUR 301, NUR 302, and NUR 415; or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall,  Spring and Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 320 - Nursing Care Management of Women, Infants and Families


    Focuses on the comprehensive care of women from adolescence through older adulthood.  The reproductive process is examined as a part of the life cycle continuum and family health.  Health promotion, and disease prevention and management concepts are emphasized as they apply to pregnancy, prenatal care, birth, and post-delivery period, newborn care, and parenting.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201 and FSN 101 and NUR 301 and NUR 303 and NUR 404 and PSY 212.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 321 - Maternal, Newborn, and Women’s Health Nursing Clinical


    Encompasses Obstetrical lab in the LRC for four hours and seven days (8 hrs per shift) on the maternity/newborn unit at Eastern Maine Medical Center.  Students will be assigned to a community hospital of their choice for two days (8 hrs per day) and a primary care setting that serves women and their families (8 hrs per day).  Total clinical hours 84. Students will register for one day of clinical per week and will complete all clinical assignments on that day.

    Prerequisites: NUR 320. 

    Corequisites: NUR 320

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    NUR 330 - Nursing Care Management of Children and Families


    Students develop a comprehensive approach to the care of infants, children, adolescents and families.  Utilize developmental approach in health promotion and care of pediatric patients with acute or chronic illness.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing in the School of Nursing. CHF 201 and NUR 301 and NUR 404 and PSY 212 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 331 - Nursing Care Management of Children and Families Clinical


    Students utilize the nursing process to provide comprehensive nursing care for pediatric patients and families in acute and primary care settings.

    Prerequisites: CHF 201 and FSN 101 and NUR 301 and NUR 404 and PSY 212 and (NUR 330 or concurrently.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    NUR 334 - Care of Adults III


    This course continues to extend the student’s understanding of the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to provide holistic, evidenced-based care of adults with chronic and complex health concerns. Concepts of patient-centered care, quality improvement, safety, teamwork and collaboration, and informatics are highlighted with this patient population. Exemplars provide the basis for discussion of current research, evidence from clinical practice and best practice models for this patient population.

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major, minimum grade of C in NUR 301, NUR 302, NUR 306, NUR 316, and NUR 415

    Corequisites: NUR 335

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 335 - Care of Adults III Clinical


    This course continues to extend the student’s understanding of the professional nursing role through the direct care of adults with chronic and complex health concerns in a variety of clinical settings. Students apply knowledge, skills and attitudes gained from the sciences, humanities, and previous and concurrent nursing courses to provide high quality care to adults based on standards of practice and current evidence. Students provide complex, high quality, safe patient care to acutely ill adults through the application of theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning in a variety of settings.

    NOTE: This course is intended for Nursing majors with a minimum grade of C in NUR 301, NUR 302, NUR 306, NUR 316 and NUR415

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Corequisites: NUR 334

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    NUR 335 - Clinical Adult Nursing Management


    Students provide direct care to patients with acute and chronic complex health problems with emphasis on major life-threatening illnesses. Functional health patterns provide the basis for course organization. The role of the nurse in health promotion, illness management, independent and collaborative decision making, and professional issues encountered in practice are implemented under the direction of faculty in the acute care setting.

    Prerequisites: NUR 440 or NUR 441 or concurrently.  Senior standing in the School of Nursing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    NUR 340 - Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing


    Builds on previously learned knowledge to promote a greater understanding of the nurse’s role in the care of clients who have mental health needs. Content includes an overview of mental illnesses and major treatment modalities, with an emphasis on the use of the nursing process in patient care. A major focus is the therapeutic use of relationship and communication skills in all health care settings.

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major, Minimum grade of C in NUR 301, NUR 302, NUR 306, NUR 316 and NUR 415

    Corequisites: NUR 341

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 341 - Clinical Practice in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing


    Clinical experiences offer students the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills in the direct care of patients. Helps students gain a greater understanding of mental illnesses and disorders, expand their knowledge of psychotropic medications, develop skills in therapeutic communication, and apply a broad range of therapeutic interventions that can be used in a variety of treatment settings. Students are expected to develop insight into their own preconceptions about mental illness, as well as greater self-awareness of personal responses to patient care situations.

    NOTE:  Nursing Major, minimum grade of C in NUR 301, NUR 302, NUR 306, NUR 316 and NUR 415

    Prerequisites:  Permission

    Corequisites: NUR 340

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    NUR 365 - Healthcare Informatics


    This course provides foundational knowledge regarding informatics for health care professionals. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge and skill used in information management and patient care technology to deliver safe and effective patient-centered care.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    NUR 404 - Fundamentals of Pharmacology


    The basic concepts of pharmacology for health professionals, introducing pharmacodynamics and kinetics. Emphasis on clinical pharmacology of major drug categories and major drug interactions.

    Prerequisites: For Nursing Majors; NUR 303, BMB 207/209, BMB 208/210, BIO 208.

    Corequisites: NUR 301 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 413 - Nursing Care Management of Women, Infants and Families


    Focuses on the comprehensive care of women from adolescence through older adulthood. The reproductive process is examined as a part of the life cycle continuum and family health. Health promotion, and disease prevention and management concepts are emphasized as they apply to pregnancy, prenatal care, birth, and post-delivery period, newborn care, and parenting.

    Prerequisites: Nursing major; Minimum grade of C in NUR 334, NUR 335, NUR 340 and NUR 341

    Corequisites: NUR 414

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 414 - Maternal, Newborn, and Women’s Health Nursing Clinical


    Students provide comprehensive family-centered care for childbearing families in acute and primary care settings. Students also have clinical simulation experiences in the School of Nursing Learning Resource Center.

    NOTE:  Nursing major in good standing with minimum grade of “C” in NUR 334, NUR 335, NUR 340 and NUR 341

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Corequisites:   NUR 413

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    NUR 415 - Socio-Cultural Issues in Health and Health Care


    This course explores social and cultural influences on health and illness. Cultural diversity, cultural competence, social determinants of health, health disparities, and health literacy will be topics covered. 

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major

    Corequisites: NUR 301, 302, 316. Non-nursing by department consent

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 416 - Nursing Care Management of Children and Families


    Students develop a comprehensive approach to the care of infants, children, adolescents and families. Utilize developmental approach in health promotion and care of pediatric patients with acute or chronic illness.

    Prerequisites: Nursing major; Minimum grade of C in NUR 334, NUR 335, NUR 340 and NUR 341,

    Corequisites: NUR 417 (may be taken prior to NUR 417 with department consent)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 417 - Nursing Care Management of Children and Families


    Students utilize the nursing process to provide comprehensive nursing care for pediatric patients and families in acute and primary care settings.

    NOTE:  Nursing major in good standing with minimum grade of C in NUR 334, NUR 335, NUR 340 and NUR 341

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Corequisites: NUR 416 (may be taken prior to NUR 417)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    NUR 419 - Introduction and Service to Global Health


    This course will introduce students to global health concepts and will explore global burden of diseases, social and environmental determinants of health, implications of migration, travel and displacement, and globalization of health and healthcare. The students will learn about health disparities in undeserved and underprivileged countries.  The meaning of global citizenship and the role of the nurse as an advocate for human rights will be explored. Field and living conditions may be rigorous and/or primitive and include travel/overnight stay.  The course will meet weekly prior to the travel component. There is a fee associated with this course for travel expenses. This course is for students that are in the Nursing Major.

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 435 - Nursing Care of Patients and Families at End of Life


    This course further develops students’ knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to provide quality, patient-centered care at the end of life. Key recommendations from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s Peaceful death: recommended competencies and curricular guidelines for end of life nursing care will be incorporated into the course.

    Note:  non-Nursing majors may take course with department consent

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major and a minimum grade of C in NUR 200, NUR 201, and NUR 202 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    NUR 440 - Nursing Care Management of Adults II


    One of two senior level courses focusing on acute and chronic complex health problems with emphasis on major life threatening illnesses. Functional health patterns provide the basis for course organization. The role of the nurse in health promotion, illness management, independent and collaborative decision making, and professional issues encountered in practice are discussed in class. Lec 2.

    Prerequisites: NUR 320, NUR 321, NUR 330, NUR 331 and NUR 404.  Senior standing in School of Nursing and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 444 - Management and Leadership in Health Care System


    This course focuses on leadership and management competencies needed by professional nurses to be successful in leading themselves, others and organizations as a full partner in inter-professional teams.  Theoretical and evidence-based frameworks are used to analyze current best practices in leadership and management.  Emphasis is placed on the student’s understanding of leadership roles, systems communications, team dynamics, quality improvement, and resource management.  Leadership activities and projects provide opportunities for students to expand their leadership and management skills and to assume the role of nurse as a change agent.

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major, Minimum grade of C in NUR 413, NUR 414, NUR 416, NUR 417, NUR 452 and NUR 453

    Corequisites: NUR 447 and NUR 455 and NUR 456

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 447 - Clinical Reflection Seminar


    Utilizes discourse to foster interpersonal and group communication skills, group role-taking, critical thinking, reflection upon clinical practice and integration of theory with practice. Sem 3.

    General Education Requirements:  Capstone Experience

    Prerequisites: Nursing Major, minimum grade of C in NUR 413, NUR 414, NUR 416, NUR 417, NUR 452 and NUR 453 and cumulative GPA 3.0

    Corequisites: NUR 444, NUR 455 and NUR 456

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    NUR 450 - Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing


    Builds on previously learned knowledge to promote a greater understanding of the nurse’s role in the care of clients who have mental health needs. Content includes an overview of mental illnesses and major treatment modalities, with an emphasis on the use of the nursing process in patient care. A major focus is the therapeutic use of relationship and communication skills in all health care settings.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in the School of Nursing. 

    Corequisites: NUR 451

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 451 - Clinical Practice in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing


    Clinical experiences offer students the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills in the direct care of patients. Helps students gain a greater understanding of mental illnesses and disorders, expand their knowledge of psychotropic medications, develop skills in therapeutic communication, and apply a broad range of therapeutic interventions that can be used in a variety of treatment settings. Students are expected to develop insight into their own preconceptions about mental illness, as well as greater self-awareness of personal responses to patient care situations.

    Prerequisites: NUR 450 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    NUR 452 - Community and Population Health


    Introduces students to the concepts and principles of community health care.  Students will gain knowledge about primary, secondary, tertiary prevention, public health frameworks, policy, health determinants, and epidemiology. Students will develop evidence-based, population-focused interventions about current public and community health issues. Students perform population and community assessments and interventions as well as engage in extensive service learning. 

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: Nursing major, minimum grade of C in NUR 334, NUR 335, NUR 340 and NUR 341

    Corequisites: NUR 453

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 453 - Community Nursing Care Management


    Focus on concepts and principles of community health nursing. Students are introduced to the role of the community health nurse and the community as a client. Students will use the functional health patterns framework for nursing diagnoses of individuals, families and communities. Current issues influencing the health of communities are examined. The clinical focus includes health promotion, disease prevention, health maintenance and restoration. A variety of clinical experiences are offered in community based settings.

    NOTE: Nursing Major; A minimum grade of C in NUR 334, NUR 335, NUR 340, NUR 341

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Corequisites: NUR 452

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    NUR 455 - Senior Clinical Practicum


    A capstone experience in which students apply knowledge gained from all prior semesters, including theoretical, clinical, and research knowledge for the provision of evidence-based, safe patient care.  Students are partnered with expert nurses providing acute and chronic health care services in a variety of settings.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone Experience and Ethics

    Prerequisites: Nursing major, cumulative GPA of 3.0,  minimum grade of C in NUR 413, NUR 414, NUR 416, NUR 417, NUR 452, NUR 453

    Corequisites: NUR 444, NUR 447 and NUR 456

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    NUR 456 - Professional Practice Through the Lifespan


    This course synthesizes the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of professional nursing practice at the baccalaureate level. Emphasis is on the multi-faceted role of the professional nurse in the provision of care across the health-illness continuum throughout the lifespan. Content is designed to assist students to assess complex patient care needs during transitions in care settings as a vital member of the inter-professional team. Standardized testing, practice questions, and a review session will be incorporated to help prepare students for licensure exam. 

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in the School of Nursing and successful completion with a minimum grade of “C” in NUR 452 and NUR 453. Department consent required.

    Corequisites: NUR 444, NUR 447, NUR 455, NUR 457

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 457 - Professional Nursing Practice through the Lifespan Laborabory


    This course synthesizes the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of professional nursing practice at the baccalaureate level in a laboratory and/or simulation setting. Emphasis is on the multi-faceted role of the professional nurse in the provision of care across the health-illness continuum throughout the lifespan. Content is designed to assist students in assessing complex patient care needs during transitions in care settings as a vital member of the inter-professional team in a simulated setting.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in the School of Nursing and successful completion with a minimum grade of C in NUR 452 and NUR 453. Department consent required.

    Corequisites: NUR 444, NUR 447, NUR 455, NUR 456

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    NUR 495 - Independent Study in Nursing


    Individualized study with permission of the instructor. May or may not have an experiential component.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    NUR 497 - Projects in Nursing


    Individualized project with permission of the instructor. May or may not have an experiential component.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1-3

Peace Studies

  
  •  

    PAX 201 - Introduction to Peace and Reconciliation Studies


    Introduces students to various concepts in the field of Peace and Reconciliation Studies. Topics include forms of violence and their relationship to social structure and cultural practices; global militarization and environmental destruction and their impact on human needs; and peace-making and conflict resolution at both micro and macro levels.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 250 - Peace and Pop Culture


    Incorporates case studies and creative expression by active artist-peace builders working in different media throughout the World.  Students will investigate the sources, causes, processes and products that reside at the intersection of peace and popular culture.  Students will interpret, analyze and evaluate examples from art, music, theater, dance, poetry, literature, museums, gardens, trails, film, television, magazine, cartoon, radio, Internet, video game, and comic book publishing industries.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions, Artistic and Creative Expression, and Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 260 - Realistic Pacifism


    Using the international examples of such pragmatic practitioners of non-violence as Gandhi, this course explores the promise and success of peacemaking.  The broad influences of religion, democracy and social justice movement as applied to the struggle against global terrorism, and the ways in which these complex factors can converge to create a culture of forgiveness, reconciliation and restorative justice, will be the focus of the course.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 290 - Nonviolence: Perceptions and Perspectives


    Nonviolence is a cornerstone of Peace and Reconciliation Studies, and a thorough understanding of the history, theory, and practice of the ideas and ethics relating to nonviolence is essential. This interdisciplinary course investigates the development of theories of nonviolence and philosophical, cultural, and religious perspectives on nonviolence. Examples of the practice of nonviolence from across the globe are highlighted, and the skills and tools necessary for the ethical practice of nonviolence and the creation of cultures of peace are investigated. This course is required for the Peace and Reconciliation Studies minor and certificates.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity or International Perspectives and Ethics.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 350 - Buddhism, Peace and Contemplative Traditions


    An introduction to Buddhism and its relationship to Zen and Western contemplative traditions. Some philosophical aspects of Buddhism as well as stories, sutras, ethical precepts, relationship to ecological concerns and the embodying of the Way in our daily lives.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 351 - This Sacred Earth: Ecology and Spirituality


    Examines Eastern and Western views on the environment in terms of spiritual traditions. A major part of the course addresses a new approach to spirituality of nature, called Deep Ecology which includes ecotheology and ecofeminist spirituality.

    General Education Requirements:  Ethics

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 360 - Conflict Resolution: A Relational Approach To Working Through Conflict


    Emphasis on alignment of premises, practices and policies that have shaped the field on the local, national and international levels.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 370 - Building Sustainable Communities


    Explores the essential ideas and necessary institutions for building sustainable communities including social, cultural and physical environments. Specific examples of sustainable communities and eco-villages worldwide will be highlighted.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 380 - Ecovillages and Ecocities: Models of Global Restoration


    This course explores the essential ideas for a transition to an environmental century by investigating global ecovillages and ecocities as guides to sustainable communities.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 398 - Topics in Peace and Reconciliation Studies


    Explores peace and reconciliation studies through more in-depth study of specific topics drawn from the introductory course, such as the roles of technology, religion, gender, ethnicity and social stratification in the establishment and maintenance of peace and reconciliation studies. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 400 - Martin Luther King and the Promise of Social Renewal


    The just community is a distinctively American idea, beginning with the vision of the Founders and renewed in the writings of Martin Luther King, Jr. in envisioning an America - and a world - at peace through principles of social justice, reconciliation, non-violence and equality.  This course looks at the concept of King’s Beloved Community as a way to peace through a multidisciplinary investigation focusing on the Civil Rights Movement and after, using the lens of multiple faith and ethically-based aspirations for community.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Context and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: One of the following: MLC 175, PAX 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, WST 101 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 401 - Women Social Activists: Warriors for Peace and Justice


    This course examines the lives of a diverse group of women who were committed activists attempting to create change.  It examines the historical, social, and political circumstances that motivated these women to actively seek social transformation.  It also looks at what some of the current generation of women activists/feminists have to say about peace and social justice issues.

    General Education Requirements: Social Context and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: PAX 201 or WST 101 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 410 - Theories in Peace and Reconciliation Studies


    An exploration and critical discussion of historical and contemporary theories about conflict, peace, and reconciliation.  Course offered via WebCT.

    Prerequisites: PAX 201 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 451 - Mediation: Its Premises, Practices and Policies


    Introduces students to the theory and practice of mediation. Participants will reflect together on the nature and origins of conflict and its impact on society and individuals. Students will acquire and practice the skills needed for effective conflict management.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 452 - Advanced Study in Transformative Mediation


    Students will deepen their understanding of the premises and principles of the transformative orientation to mediation practice. Students will consider how values and belief systems impact the development of mediation models or schools of thought. Includes skills development through intensive coaching.

    Prerequisites: PAX 451 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PAX 470 - Sustainable Communication: The Theory and Practice of Nonviolent Communication


    This three credit interdisciplinary course combines the principles of Peace and Reconciliation Studies with cutting edge work in conflict transformation and reconciliation through dialogue. Based on the work of clinical psychologist Marshall Rosenberg, participants will investigate and practice the Nonviolent Communication (NVC) process he developed. The course will provide participants with concrete skills in thinking and speaking which are necessary for analyzing and addressing conflict in a variety of settings. The goal is to increase peace in themselves, their personal and work communities, and the world. Additionally, a goal is to provide students with specific tools to work collaboratively within any team experience to enhance the likelihood of success in any future endeavor through building a process to maintain and sustain efforts for the long term.


    This process is beneficial for enhancing and sustaining peace, good will, and collaboration among people who work in education, health care, social work, psychology, international relations, sustainable community development, human development, mediation and conflict resolution, the creative arts and business. The skills learned are useful in personal and family relationships.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 3

 

Page: 1 <- Back 1011 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21