Jan 17, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HTY 341 - The Making of Modern China


    A survey of social, economic, cultural and political development in China from 1600 to the present. Emphasis will be on the 20th century, especially on the Communist Revolution and the “market economy reform” period since 1978.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 349 - Early Modern North America in Atlantic Perspective


    Reflecting the increasing globalization of modern society, this course employs an Atlantic perspective to understand the international history of early modern North America. Focuses on the geography of the European empires that shaped North America, beginning with the Spanish and the French, and then focusing on the British and the revolt of the American colonies.  (GEO 349 and HTY 349 are identical courses.)

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 365 - The American Immigrant Experience


    Writing Intensive course that examines the many kinds of immigrant experiences in the American colonies and the United States from 1600 to the present day, drawing on first-person accounts and historians’ interpretations.  Considers the influence of age, sex, legal status, race, religion, occupation, and class, as well as whether immigrants came voluntarily, as free persons, or by force, as slave labor.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Population & Environment

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 398 - Historical Issues


    An exploration of selected contemporary historical issues not covered in existing courses. In some cases the specific topic and methodology may be chosen jointly by interested students and an instructor.

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 402 - Roman History


    The rise of ancient Rome from a small Italian town to mistress of the Mediterranean. Problems of excessive greatness including failure of a city-state republic to rule a vast empire and triumph of Caesarism. Covers the establishment of the “Roman Peace” under the emperors, “Christianization” and problem of the “Decline of Rome”.

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 403 - Early Middle Ages


    Europe from late antiquity to about 950, considering the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments during Merovingian and Carolingian times, emphasizing the early medieval agricultural revolution and reconstructing the factors affecting the lives of ordinary people.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 404 - Late Middle Ages


    Social, economic, political, and intellectual history of Europe from 950 to the Renaissance, focusing on the medieval frontier period and the late medieval era of environmental crisis and economic contraction.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 405 - Early Modern Europe: The Age of Reform


    A survey of the cultural, religious, social, economic and political history of Europe from 1300 to the end of the period of religious wars.  Emphasis on the cultural rebirth following upon the recovery of the art, literature and philosophy of cultural antiquity; on the Reformation and Counter-Reformation as marking the end of the “closed,” relatively homogeneous world of Medieval Christendom and an entrance into a more open universe of spiritual and intellectual possibilities; and on the economic, social and technological transformations that made possible and were in turn accelerated by the expansion of European societies into Africa, Asia and the Americas.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, Western Cultural Tradition and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Three Credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 407 - The Age of Monarchs and Revolution: Europe, 1648-1815


    Covers the later part of Early Modern European history and the early years of modern Europe: 1648-1815. Discusses the concepts and significant social and political events and issues, such as absolutist monarchies, feudalism, nobility, the Church, peasantry, the Enlightenment, nationalism, liberalism, the French Revolution, and the Napoleonic Empire.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites:  Three credits of History or permission.

    Corequisites: Not Regularly Offered

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 409 - European Society and Culture in the Age of Total War


    Europe in the age of the two world wars, focusing on the causes and consequences of the wars themselves, concurrent political and social problems, and the intellectual and cultural contexts.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 411 - The Holocaust


    The Nazi persecution and extermination of European Jews (1933-1945) including the exploration of modern anti-Semitism, Nazi ideology, the persecution of German Jews after 1933, and the extermination of six million European Jews in Nazi occupied Europe during the Second World War.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and the Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three Credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 415 - African-American History


    Examines the African-American experience both thematically and chronologically, from slavery to emancipation, and the lives of African-Americans in the twentieth century. Includes African survivals and slave culture; the impact of racism, religion, and family on African-American lives; efforts by blacks to improve their lives; and the meaning of their history for contemporary African-Americans.

    Prerequisites: Three credits in History or instructor permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 420 - Science and Society Since 1800


    Examines the development of science, with emphasis on America, since the Scientific Revolution, both ‘internally’–as ideas and experiments–and ‘externally’–as related to America and other societies that have produced them and upon which they in turn have had impact.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: Three Credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 427 - Vikings!


    Marauding barbarians with a lust for blood and plunder, the Vikings retain their grip on the popular imagination. To what extent are our images of the medieval Norse grounded in historical reality? This course will begin by asking what archaeological finds, runestones, skaldic poetry, and foreign chroniclers can tell us about the people of Viking Age Scandinavia. We will then explore how different societies and cultural groups have shaped and reshaped images of the Vikings to suit different agendas. Our investigation will range from thirteenth-century Iceland, where medieval Christian writers composed vernacular sagas about pagan heroes, to contemporary America, where Viking imagery appears on everything from football helmets to comic books.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives.

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 432 - History of Modern Ideas


    This is a survey of some of the major currents of modern intellectual history.  In the nineteenth century, Europe was filled with presumptions of its own ascendancy and world-superiority.  These ideas were largely justified through an interpretation of history.  This course will begin by looking at the dominant place of history in the nineteenth century and, in particular, its relation to God, nature, and the nation.  It then turns to some of the grave doubts that emerged over Europe and its modes of thought.  The twentieth century can be interpreted as a disintegration of meaning and understanding, and this course will assess various attempts to describe this crisis, including endeavors to find a new basis for coherent meaning.  Such endeavors continue to the present, where this course concludes.  Attention to the history of are will supplement the discussion of texts.

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 433 - Greek and Roman Mythology


    The study of classical myths as the poetic expression of the Greek and Roman spirit, as the depiction of everything considered sacred, and as the embodiment of the basic patterns of the human psyche. Discusses the major theories of myth. Uses modern psychology and anthropology to show how the myths reveal secrets of our emotional, intellectual, and spiritual lives.

    Prerequisites: Three credits in History or instructor permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 437 - History of Modern Japan


    Survey of social, economic, cultural and political development in Japan from the last period of feudalism to the present day. Social and political structures, value changes, the rise of militarism and fascism, the effects of the Pacific War, popular movements, modernization problems and progress, and relations with the United States and the rest of the world will be discussed.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Social Contexts and Institutions Requirements.

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 442 - The United States and Vietnam: A History


    Focuses on key periods in the historical development of the United States and Vietnam and trace the history of their relations since the beginning of World War II. The economic, social, political, ideological, and cultural origins of the conflict, the conduct of the war and the aftermath in Vietnam, East Asia, and the United States will be examined.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 446 - History of Modern Middle East, 1800-Present


    The economic, social, and political transformations experienced by the Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focus on the rise of Arab nationalism and the Israeli-Arab conflict.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 449 - History of South Africa


    Examines the political, economic, and social history of South Africa from 1652 to the present. Emphasis on race relations from the establishment of the Cape Colony to the fall of Apartheid. Explores European colonization, the formation of the Zulu Empire, the South African War, and the birth of the New South Africa.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 459 - Colonial Canada


    Canada’s history from New France to 1850, emphasizing political, social, and economic developments and relations with the American people. (This course is identical to FAS 459.)

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 460 - Modern Canada


    Canada’s history from Confederation to the present, emphasizing political, social, and economic developments and Canada’s relations with the United States.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Ethics

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 461 - Colonial British America to 1763


    Examines the founding and development of English-speaking colonies in the New World. Themes include the trans-Atlantic context of colonization, Native Americans, the growth of slavery, and religious and regional variation in colonial America.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 462 - The American Revolution


    Explores the pivotal era that created the United States as an independent nation in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. In addition to a traditional focus on the Revolutionary War and the Federal Constitution, the course also considers conflict within patriot ranks as well as the experience of people who did not necessarily benefit from the Revolution.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 463 - The Early Republic, 1789-1840


    Explores the shaping of American society by people and events between the years 1789-1840.  While paying due attention to political and economic changes during this period, the focus will be on the lives and experiences of ordinary people: their families, work, homelife, communities, attitudes and expectations.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition, Social Contexts/Institutions and Cultural Diversity/International Perspectives Requirements.

    Prerequisites: Three credits in History or instructor permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 464 - America at the Crossroads: The Era of Civil War Reconstruction 1840-1876


    Problems and processes involved in territorial expansion, economic growth, the slavery issue, civil war, and the reconstruction of American society.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 465 - American Landscapes


    Investigates the shaping of American landscapes and interpretation of those landscapes in history, fiction and art. In particular, the course explores the ways in which Americans used idealizations of the physical environment to define certain cultural attributes and to explain social transformations.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 467 - Early 20th Century America, 1914-1945


    Changes in American politics, economics, society, and culture including the Wilson era of reform and intervention in World War I, the age of business, depression and the New Deal of FDR, World War II and American global power.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 468 - America Since 1945


    Changes in American politics, economics, society, and culture including the Cold War and McCarthyism, protest movements of the 1960s, Watergate, the energy crisis and economic recession, affluence and poverty in the 1980s.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 473 - History of U.S. Foreign Relations I


    U.S. foreign relations from the Revolution to World War I. Explores the role of government and private individuals and groups (pioneers, businesspeople, missionaries) in shaping U.S. interactions with other societies and nations as it expanded across the North American continent and evolved into a world power. Includes critical examinations of U.S. foreign relations by Indian, Latin American, Asian and European nations, and by internal dissenters.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 474 - History of U.S. Foreign Relations II


    Explores the role of the U.S. in international affairs from 1914 to the present. Considers formal U.S. diplomacy and military activities and role of private individuals and groups such as businesspeople, labor and peace activists, and peddlers of American cultural products (movies, jeans, etc.) in shaping U.S. interactions with other nations. Includes critical examinations of U.S. foreign relations by other nations and by internal dissenters.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 477 - The American Worker


    Examines changes in the world of work during successive phases of capitalist development since the Revolutionary War. Focus on skilled and unskilled labor; the evolving factory system; public policies and effects of technological change; ethnicity, race, and gender on worker responses. Assesses contemporary workplace issues from an historical perspective.

    General Education Requirements:  Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 479 - U.S. Environmental History


    The attitudes, policies, and behavior of Americans and their government toward the environment. Current issues evolving out of past attitudes and policies.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Population and the Environment

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 480 - Global Environmental History


    Environmental history is the study of past interactions between humans and nature, and this course examines environmental historical processes on the global scale by comparing and contrasting on the local, regional, and national scales over time. While it is impossible to cover the environmental history of the whole globe, in-depth explorations of seven major themes, including agriculture and settlement, biological exchanges, and urbanization and industrialization, will thoroughly introduce students to the subfield of global environmental history. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze at length specific environmental historical subject matter and improve their digital literacy through group website projects.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Three credits in History or instructor permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 491 - Technology and Society Until 1800


    Examines the development of technology from earliest times through the English Industrial Revolution, both ‘internally’, as tools and machines, and ‘externally’, as related to the societies that have produced them and upon which they in turn have had impact.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 492 - Technology and Society Since 1800


    Examines the development of technology, with emphasis on America, since the English Industrial Revolution, both ‘internally’–as tools and machines–and ‘externally’–as related to America and other societies that have produced them and upon which they in turn have had impact.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition

    Prerequisites: Three credits of History or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    HTY 498 - Senior Seminar in History


    Intensive reading, research, and writing under the close supervision of an instructor on a selected problem in American or European history. Required of History majors.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive and Capstone

    Prerequisites: Restricted to history majors with senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3

Honors

  
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    HON 111 - Civilizations: Past, Present and Future I


    The four courses constituting Civilizations: Past, Present and Future follow a chronological trajectory from earliest recorded times through the present, examining philosophy, history, literature, the arts and natural, physical and social sciences. In particular, by incorporating primary sources, small group discussions and multiple perspectives, these courses explore the way in which civilizations and cultures have been developed and have interacted with others. (Offered in the Fall semester.)

    General Education Requirements:  Completion of any of these courses (HON 111, 112, 211 or 212) satisfies either the General Education Western Cultural Tradition or the Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives requirement. Completion of any two satisfies the Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, and Ethics requirements. Completion of three satisfies the Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, Social Context and Institutions, and Ethics requirements. Completion of all four satisfies the Ethics requirement and all areas of the Human Values and Social Context requirements for 16 of the total 18 credits required in those areas.  In addition, HON 211 and HON 212 each are designated Writing Intensive. Successful completion of HON 111 and HON 112 with a grade of C or better in each, satisfies the University’s basic composition requirement (ENG 101.)

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    HON 112 - Civilizations: Past, Present and Future II


    The second course in the Honors Civilizations sequence.  (Offered in the Spring semester.)

    General Education Requirements: Completion of any of these courses (HON 111, 112, 211 or 212) satisfies either the General Education Western Cultural Tradition or the Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives requirement. Completion of any two satisfies the Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, and Ethics requirements. Completion of three satisfies the Western Cultural Tradition, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives, Social Context and Institutions, and Ethics requirements. Completion of all four satisfies the Ethics requirement and all areas of the Human Values and Social Context requirements for 16 of the total 18 credits required in those areas.  In addition, HON 211 and HON 212 each are designated Writing Intensive. Successful completion of HON 111 and HON 112 with a grade of C or better in each, satisfies the University’s basic composition requirement (ENG 101.)

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    HON 150 - Phage Genome Discovery I


    This inquiry-driven research course provides a hands-on laboratory experience in which students isolate a novel bacteriophage from the environment and characterized the bacteriophage through experimentation. Topics covered include phage biology and bacteriology, gene structure and expression, DNA isolation, restriction digest analysis, agarose gel electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. In this writing intensive course, students will learn effective scientific writing skills through instruction and writing activities and will write a final manuscript to report their research findings.  Students also carry out activities and reflective writing assignments that simultaneously teach students both scientific content as well as personal, interpersonal, and critical-thinking skills essential to the practice of science.  (HON 150 and BMB 150 are identical courses.)

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    HON 155 - Genome Discovery II: From DNA to Genes


    Provides laboratory experience working on DNA sequence from a bacteriophage isolated during the previous semester.  Topics include bioinformatics, genome annotation, open reading frame and RNA identification, BLAST analysis, phylogenetics and submission to a genomic database.  In addition students will gain skills in designing and running computational experiments, reading the scientific literature, writing scientific papers, and making oral presentations.

     (HON 155 and BMB 155 are identical courses)

    Prerequisites: HON 150

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    HON 170 - Currents and Context


    An opportunity for students to develop and enhance their awareness and understanding of events throughout the region, the country, and the world as well as to improve dialogue about these. In doing so, students will employ up-to-date information sources to explore issues including, but not limited to cultural conflicts; the roles of intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations (IGOs and NGOs); the three branches of American government; the economy; the environment; and political debates of global, regional, and local concern.  May be repeated once for credit. 

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Honors College or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    HON 175 - SL: Community Building and Engagement


    This course explores the nature of community and community engagement in relation to civic identity, responsibility, and social connectedness. Students will spend time in a sustainable island community off the coast of Rockland, Maine, and learn what it means to be part of such a society. During the semester, students plan and carry out service learning projects working with community partners. They reflect what it means to be part of a community through readings and participation in the community projects at times to be determined.

    General Education Requirements: Social Context and Institutions

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    HON 180 - A Cultural Odyssey


    An opportunity for students to extend their cultural education in the context of opportunities available at the University of Maine and in the surrounding area. Various arts events including dance, music, theatre, poetry, and visual art will be explored and analyzed. May be repeated once for credit. Required for all students in the Honors College.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Honors College or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1
  
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    HON 188 - Cultural Connections


    An opportunity for students to explore cultural opportunities available at the University of Maine and in the surrounding area.  Students will attend and react to arts events including dance, music, theatre, poetry, and visual art.  Required for all students in the Honors College who do not complete HON 180.

    Credits: 0
  
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    HON 190 - Honors Summer Readings: Basic


    An individually arranged program of readings during the summer. For students wanting to supplement their work in HON 111 and HON 112.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 1
  
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    HON 211 - Civilizations: Past, Present and Future III


    The third course in the Honors Civilizations sequence.  (Offered in the Fall semester.)

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 4
  
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    HON 212 - Civilizations: Past, Present and Future IV


    The fourth course in the Honors Civilizations sequence.  (Offered in the Spring semester.)

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    HON 290 - Honors Summer Readings: Intermediate


    Guided summer readings and reports, individually adapted to the student’s program of study. For students wanting to supplement their readings in HON 211 and HON 212.

    Prerequisites: permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 1
  
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    HON 308 - Visiting Scholar in Ethics Tutorial


    An opportunity for students, through careful reading, thorough research, and measured discussion to determine the John M. Rezendes Visiting Scholar in Ethics to be brought to campus for the following year. Students in the tutorial will develop and refine criteria for the decision, analyze evidence presented about the candidates, deliberate using those criteria, and correspond and negotiate with viable candidates to determine availability and suitability.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics

    Prerequisites: Junior standing in Honors College with three first- or second-year Honors courses and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    HON 309 - The Honors Read Tutorial


    An opportunity through careful reading, analytic and synthetic writing and extensive discussion, to select, from among eight texts nominated by the University community, the “Honors Read” for incoming students in the Honors College a year hence. The tutorial will include developing and refining criteria for the decision, analysis and reaction to the texts incorporating those criteria and preparing a summative letter of transmittal to be included with the texts delivered to the incoming students. 

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression

    Prerequisites: Sophomore or Junior standing in Honors College with three first- or second-year Honors courses and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    HON 310 - Honors Tutorial


    Small group discussions, under tutorial direction, of important readings in a specific topic or theme. May be repeated for credit with the permission of the dean of The Honors College.  (Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters and occasionally in the Summer Session.)

    General Education Requirements: May satisfy several General Education categories; contact The Honors College for details.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing in Honors College and at least three of HON 111, HON 112, HON 211 or HON 212.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    HON 349 - Tutorial Alternative Portfolio


    Presentation of materials documenting a pre-approved and completed Tutorial Alternative. Supervised by an Honors College associate and the Dean of the Honors College. 

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 0

  
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    HON 350 - Honors Seminar


    Topics in such subject areas as the arts, philosophy, history of science, the study of society, etc. Specific topics vary.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    HON 391 - Introduction to Thesis Research


    A series of weekly meetings designed to provide prospective Honors thesis writers with the background, resources and understanding necessary to produce quality independent work. Will engage students in investigating previous theses written in The Honors College, discussions with students currently writing theses and faculty advising theses, identifying a thesis advisor, developing an individual thesis topic, increasing information literacy and research skills and producing an annotated bibliography or literature review.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: Junior standing in Honors College.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 1

  
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    HON 396 - Honors Independent Study


    A tutorially conducted study of a topic outside the student’s major field. May be repeated once for credit, with permission.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    HON 397 - Honors Specialized Study


    A tutorially conducted study in the student’s major field, usually resulting in the choice of a thesis topic or initiation of thesis research. May be repeated once for credit, with permission.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    HON 398 - Honors Independent Research


    Tutorially conducted independent research. May be repeated once for credit, with permission.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    HON 450 - Honors Distinguished Lecture Series


    A series of lectures by a distinguished lecturer or lecturers, involving collateral reading and group discussions.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    HON 498 - Honors Directed Study


    Tutorially directed research for the senior thesis or project.  Required of all four-year students graduating with a degree with Honors. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and occasionally in Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    HON 499 - Honors Thesis


    The completion of the senior project begun in HON 498. Required of all four-year students graduating with a degree with Honors.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and occasionally in Summer

    Credits: 3

Innovations

  
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    INV 101 - Exploring Innovation


    This course is designed for students who are interested in finding out more about innovation, especially as it relates to startup businesses. The course will introduce ways of stimulating creativity, emphasize working in diverse teams and problem-solving to increase speed and decrease risk when it comes to innovation and new business opportunities. Students will 1) learn what is innovation and how to use a simple metric to identify innovation, 2) see/hear about applications of innovation in a variety of fields, 3) learn how to make smart decisions for investing in innovation.

    Prerequisites: Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Odd Years

    Credits: 1
  
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    INV 121 - Innovation Engineering: Fundamentals


    Regardless of one’s field of study, students need to be able to identify problems and generate solutions, communicate these solutions effectively, and test and implement them successfully. Innovation Engineering is a tool set and a system, that incorporates these skills and teaches students how to rapidly innovate and solve everyday problems. This course is designed to provide a complete overview of the Innovation Engineering system.

    General Education Requirements: This course fulfills the Artistic & Creative Expressions and Social Context & Institutions General Education requirements.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    INV 180 - Create: Innovation Engineering I


    Provides a systematic approach to creativity, the foundation for students to understand how to generate innovative ideas in any field.  Gives students the theories behind and practice using tools to generate meaningfully unique ideas.  These tools engage creative stimulus, diversity, and mining for technology and economic, social and cultural trends.  Examines case histories that demonstrate how social and cultural contexts and human institutions have been influenced by innovative individuals who have realized original ideas in practice.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Contexts and Institutions

    Prerequisites: INV 121

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    INV 282 - Communicate: Innovation Engineering II


    Combines elements of several disciplines: the clarity of professional writing, the precision of technical writing, and the expressiveness of creative writing.  Attention to narrative power of visual imagery as well as text; emphasis on authentic writing, writing as a method of prototyping, and technology translation.  Students learn to communicate the benefit, the uniqueness, and the credibility of a concept.  Students work with innovators to explore and translate the benefits of technical and specialized ideas to a target audience.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    INV 392 - Commercialize: Innovation Engineering III


    So you have an exciting idea: how do you quantify its risks and benefits? How can you reduce the unknown quantities in your process of creating and realizing? Students learn to apply principles of the scientific method and design experiments for evaluating ideas and making them real.  Students perform rapid test cycles using Fermi estimating, forecasting and statistical analysis to determine the feasibility, sustainability or profitability of ideas.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: INV 180

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    INV 401 - Systems: Innovation Engineering IV


    In this course, students will learn how to apply the tools and strategies learned in earlier courses into a system approach to innovation.  Through this process, students will learn to lead systems for building alignment, collaboration and capacity to generate and implement new ideas in a wide range of organizations.  The course will also cover the fundamentals of systems thinking, tools for measuring the performance of a system, and practice developing innovation strategies.

    Prerequisites: INV 180 and INV 282 and INV 392

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    INV 405 - Project: Innovation Engineering V


    Emphasizes the intensive application of concepts explored in earlier Innovation Engineering courses with the purpose of creating students’ own project proposals.  Students will be expected to identify a problem or opportunity and to research existing solutions to the problem before developing their own ideas.

    Prerequisites: INV 180 and INV 282 and INV 392, or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    INV 406 - Make It Real: Innovation Engineering VI


    Students will have an opportunity during a full semester to take their own idea from proposal stage to prototype and beyond.  Projects may be individual or team-based.  (Pass/Fail Grade Only)

    Prerequisites: INV 405 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    INV 471 - Special Topics in Innovation


    Provides opportunities for reflective and theoretical approaches to topics in innovation.  Topics might include: innovation and medicine, finding money for innovation, innovations and development in the third world, universal design and innovation, innovations in aquaculture.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    INV 480 - Internship in Innovation


    With submission of proposal approved by the curriculum committee and director of the Innovation Engineering academic program, students working as interns with public or private sector organizations on projects aimed at innovation may register for credit hours.  May be repeated for credit up to six credit hours.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1-6
  
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    INV 490 - Independent Study in Innovation


    With approval of curriculum committee and director of academic program, students may create a plan of study for one semester with the guidance of a faculty member in Innovation.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1-3

Intensive English Institute

  
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    IEI 027 - Travel Writing


    The Travel Writing course is designed for visiting Exchange Students only. It provides an opportunity for students to visit various Maine locations over the course of a semester while also learning the art of travel writing. The class meets once a week for fifty minutes and the trips to Maine locations are offered every other week.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 045 - Intensive English I


    This course is the first in a series of four intensive English language courses, taken over the Spring and Summer semesters, designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university -level curriculum.  The focus of these courses is on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will be placed in this course based on the IEI English Language Placement Test.  This course takes the place of IEI 060 and IEI 061.

    Prerequisites: Permission required.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring and Summer

    Credits: 0
  
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    IEI 046 - Intensive English II


    This course is the second in a series of four intensive English language courses, taken over the Spring and Summer semesters, designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university -level curriculum.  The focus of these courses is on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. This course takes the place of IEI 070 and IEI 071.

    Prerequisites: Permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 0
  
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    IEI 047 - Intensive English III


    This course is the third in a series of four intensive English language courses, taken over the Spring and Summer semesters, designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of these courses is on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  IEI 047 takes the place of IEI 080 and IEI 081. 

    Prerequisites: IEI 46 and permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring and Summer. 

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 048 - Intensive English IV


    This course is the fourth and final in a series of four intensive English language courses, taken over the Spring and Summer semesters, designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university -level curriculum.  The focus of these courses is on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  This course takes the place of IEI 080 and IEI 081.

    Prerequisites: Permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring and Summer

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 050 - Basic English: Listening and Speaking


    IEI 050 and IEI 051, which are taken together, are normally the first in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed.

    Prerequisites: Permission required.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 051 - Basic English: Reading and Writing


    IEI 050 and IEI 051, which are taken together, are normally the first in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed.

    Prerequisites: Permission required. 

    Corequisites: IEI 50

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 060 - Introductory English: Listening and Speaking


    IEI 060 and IEI 061, which are taken together, are normally the first in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed. 

    Prerequisites: IEI 50 and IEI 51 and permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and spring

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 061 - Introductory English: Reading and Writing


    IEI 060 and IEI 061, which are taken together, are normally the first in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed.  

    Prerequisites: IEI 50 and IEI 51 and permission required. 

    Corequisites: IEI 60

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 0
  
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    IEI 070 - Intermediate English I: Listening and Speaking


    IEI 070 and IEI 071, which are taken together, are normally the second in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed.  

    Prerequisites: IEI 60 and IEI 61 and permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 071 - Intermediate English I: Reading and Writing


    IEI 070 and IEI 071, which are taken together, are normally the second in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  

    Prerequisites: IEI 60 and IEI 61 and permission required. 

    Corequisites: IEI 70

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 080 - Intermediate English II: Listening and Speaking


    IEI 080 and IEI 081, which are taken together, are normally the third in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed.   

    Prerequisites: IEI 70 and IEI 71 and permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 081 - Intermediate English II: Reading and Writing


    IEI 080 and IEI 081, which are taken together, are normally the third in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed.   

    Prerequisites: IEI 70 and IEI 71 and permission required. 

    Corequisites: IEI 80

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 090 - Advanced English: Listening and Speaking


    IEI 090 and IEI 191, which are taken together, are normally the fourth in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed.

    Prerequisites: IEI 80 and IEI 81 and permission required. 

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    IEI 091 - Advanced English: Reading and Writing


    IEI 090 and IEI 191, which are taken together, are normally the fourth in a series of course modules designed to provide non-native English-speaking students with the necessary linguistic foundation to successfully transition to a university-level curriculum.  The focus of the IEI program is primarily on academic language use, and includes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.  Students are initially placed in courses in the IEI program based on the English language proficiency tests given by the IEI.  In order to transfer to non-conditional status at the University of Maine, the student must complete the full sequence of courses from the initial course in which s/he is placed.    

    Prerequisites: IEI 80 and IEI 81 and permission required. 

    Corequisites: IEI 90

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 0

Interdisciplinary

  
  •  

    INT 107 - Career Exploration in Health Professions


    Students will explore career opportunities within the healthcare industry through course lectures, presentations from health professionals, assigned readings, as well as individual and team projects.  This course will provide students with an understanding of the history, ethics, personal commitment, and other requirements for a career in the healthcare industry.  BIO 100 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite for the course.

    Prerequisites: Instructor Permission.  BIO 100 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite for the course.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    INT 121 - (CHB) Introduction to Biomedical Engineering


    A survey of the various career options available through faculty discussions, laboratory interactions, presentation/discussions from outside field professionals and tours to area biomedical facilities.

    Prerequisites: Engineering majors or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    INT 188 - Introduction to Integrated Science and Career Exploration


    INT 188 is a variable credit course that involves lecture and laboratory instruction in a data collection and analysis, measuring and graphing techniques, scientific writing, evidence-based thinking, and includes group work, a research project, a career-planning assignment focusing on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields including job-shadowing experiences, and a final Research Symposium at the end of the course.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    INT 192 - Introduction to Career Development


    A 1 credit experiential course focused on assisting students with exploring and identifying their career interests and goals through the utilization of a structured career development process.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    INT 195 - (University Wide) Community Engagement / Service Learning


    Community engagement opportunity for students seeking to participate in a service learning environment.  Prior approval is required and will be based on a detailed written plan and documentation presented by the student.  The course can be repeated up to 4 times for a total of 12 credit.  Open to students in all majors as well as students with undeclared majors.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    INT 196 - (University Wide) Academic and Career Exploration Internship


    Internship for students seeking to explore their academic and career interests. Prior approval of the internship is required and will be based on a detailed written plan and documentation presented by the student and approved by the Career Center Director or the student’s Faculty Advisor or Academic Dean. Open to students in all majors as well as students with undeclared majors.

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 0-3
  
  •  

    INT 200 - (SBE) Orientation to Health Professions


    An exploration of career opportunities within the health care industry by course lectures, presentation from health professionals, assigned readings, as well as, individual and team projects. Provides students with an understanding of the history, ethics, personal commitment and other requirements for a career in the healthcare industry. Field (laboratory) experiences enhance course work by directly involving students in: first aid, CPR, patient care, medical records, medical laboratory and x-ray services, athletic trainer services, pharmacy, optometry, podiatry, nursing and ambulance services. These experiences prepare the student for future mentoring opportunities within the health professions community. Lec 3, Lab 1.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    INT 207 - Orientation to Health Professions


    This course will provide students with an understanding of the history, ethics, personal commitment, and other requirements for a career in the healthcare industry through participation in hands-on experiences and assignments.  Students will develop content intended to prepare them for applying to health professions programs and/or careers in the healthcare industry.

    Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 208 or permission of instructor

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    INT 398 - (BEN, CHE, CHY, ECE) Undergraduate Research Participation


    Research topics chosen by students in consultation with faculty members. Students submit a final report describing their research and present an oral seminar.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    INT 410 - (ANT, ENG, MLC) Introduction to the Study of Linguistics


    A survey of language structure and its socio-cultural, psychological and historical aspects. Provides conceptual and technical tools for understanding the phenomenon of language. No previous training in languages or linguistics is required.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    INT 421 - (CHB) Directed Study in Biomedical Engineering


    A self-directed study opportunity coordinated by the biomedical engineering minor faculty.

    Prerequisites: INT 121 or permission; engineering majors only.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    INT 489 - Advanced Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies


    Advanced work addressing topics with an interdisciplinary focus, bringing together 3 or more relevant disciplines.

    Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    INT 492 - Maine Learning Assistant Pedagogy Course


    The Maine Learning Assistant Pedagogy Course is designed for students who are facilitating small-group discussions in lecture, recitations, and/or labs.  This course explores issues of teaching and learning, and helps students connect with the science education literature in order to inform instructional practice.  The course also covers aspects of educational theory and practical issues associated with helping students learn Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) content.

    Credits: 1
 

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