Jul 04, 2022  
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 UMaine Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Academic Recovery Program

  
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    ARP 100 - Academic Recovery Seminar


    This pass/fail course for first-year students on academic probation during the spring semester will enhance their ability to successfully develop critical academic skills, utilize available supportive resources, and balance academic and social demands.  Students will identify and understand the tools that will facilitate a successful college experience, and in so doing, share the traditions, mission, and academic expectations of The University of Maine.  (Pass/Fail)

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 1

Accounting

  
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    ACC 201 - Principles of Financial Accounting


    This is an introduction to the organization, presentation and use of financial accounting information.  Students will understand the elements of the accounting system - assets, liabilities, equity, revenues, expenses and dividends.  Emphasis is on acquiring familiarity with the double-entry system and gaining an understanding of the purposes and uses of the information found within the income statement, balance sheet, statement of stockholder’s equity and the statement of cash flows.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing or Accounting Majors

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 202 - Principles of Managerial Accounting


    This course is an introduction to the use and preparation of accounting information for management decision-making and analysis.  It includes techniques that can be used by all businesses in evaluating, planning and controlling operations.  The course focuses on how manufacturing costs are accounted for and used to make business decisions, the nature of cost-volume-profit relationships and the contribution margin approach to decision making, preparation and use of budgets and financial statements for a manufacturing company.  It includes an introduction to job order and standard costing systems.

    Prerequisites: ACC 201 with a C- or higher.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 301 - Intermediate Accounting I


    An examination of the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, as well as an in-depth look at accounting for assets and the statement of cash flows.  While heavily mechanical, attention will be devoted to the economic environment in which financial accountants work, as well as the incentives and consequences associated with specific accounting choices.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in ACC 202, sophomore standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 302 - Intermediate Accounting II


    A continuation of ACC 301, this course focuses on the recognition, measurement, and presentation of accounting information related to (among others) investment, general liabilities and contingencies, income taxes, lease obligations, pension liabilities, and equity.  It further focuses on the preparation, calculation and interpretation of financial measures including earnings per share.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in ACC 301; sophomore standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 305 - Cost Accounting


    The course includes concepts of cost and overhead allocation, cost systems (activity-based, job order, process, and standard), budgeting, cost behavior and CVP analysis including an introduction to regression using Excel.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing and a grade of C- or better in ACC 202.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 310 - Auditing


    This course focuses on conceptual foundation to understand auditing and assurance services.  It examines the public accounting profession, auditing standards, and professional ethics. It introduces variety of auditing procedures and the steps that are taken by CPA firms in conducting audits. It also discusses different potential problems that are faced by the auditors in the real audit assignments. The course illustrates auditing with cases. It provides an opportunity for students to study auditing concepts and theory at an advanced level by examining a number of real issues.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in both ACC 301.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 312 - Federal Income Taxation


    A study of federal income tax laws as they affect individuals and businesses. The course takes a conceptual approach to understanding income tax principles such as gross income, exclusions, deductions, credits, capital gains and losses, property transactions, and other investment and business issues.  The course provides a detailed coverage of individual income tax, along with an introductory coverage of other entities including corporations, partnerships and S corporations.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in ACC 202, junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 400 - Introduction to Accounting


    An accelerated course, students will understand the elements of the accounting system - assets, liabilities, equity, revenues, expenses and dividends.  Emphasis is on acquiring familiarity with the double-entry system and gaining an understanding of the purposes and uses of the information found within the income statement, balance sheet, statement of stockholder’s equity and the statement of cash flows.  It includes concepts of cost, cost systems and budgeting.

    Prerequisites: Pre-MBA students only, permission of the Director of the MBA Program.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 406 - Advanced Managerial Accounting


    This course is a continuation of ACC 305, focusing on contemporary management accounting tools such as Strategic and Activity Based Management, Lean Accounting, the Balanced Scorecard, Productivity Measurement and Control, Quality and Environmental Costing, JIT Inventory Management and the Theory of Constraints.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in ACC 305; junior standing.  Graduate business students can take the course with permission of the instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 409 - Accounting for Governmental and Not-For-Profit Entities


    Financial accounting for not-for-profit and governmental entities and hospitals, voluntary health and welfare organizations. Includes fund accounting. GASB statements.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in ACC 201; junior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACC 490 - Special Topics in Accounting


    Study of various aspects of functional areas of accounting. Topics vary depending on faculty and student interests.  May be repeated for credit if the topics differ.

    Prerequisites: ACC 202 and Junior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-3

American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 101 - Elementary American Sign Language I


    Introduction to American Sign Language syntax, morphology, phonology, history and culture. Focus on dialogue.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 4
  
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    ASL 102 - Elementary American Sign Language II


    Continuation of skill building in American Sign Language syntax, morphology, phonology, cultural awareness. Focus on monologue.

    Prerequisites: C or better in ASL 101 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 4

Animal and Veterinary Science

  
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    AVS 145 - Introduction to Animal Science


    Participants will be introduced to the scientific fundamentals of animal sciences, including animal nutrition, genetics and breeding, reproduction, microbiology, health, management of major domesticated animal species, and current topics, including food safety, animal welfare, and sustainable agriculture.

    Prerequisites: Animal Science, Zoology, or Sustainable Agriculture major or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 146 - Introduction to Animal Science Laboratory


    Participants will be introduced to foundational applied techniques in animal nutrition, reproduction, and management of major farm animal species relevant to Maine. At the end of the course, students will apply class content to develop an animal business idea and present it to their peers.

    Prerequisites: Pre or Co-requisite AVS 145, and Animal and Veterinary Sciences major or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    AVS 196 - Introduction to Equine Cooperative


    Introductory field experience in the handling and care of the University of Maine equine herd.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 0-1
  
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    AVS 203 - Equine Management


    An introductory course designed to familiarize students with the equine industry and with the principles of equine anatomy, nutrition, disease management and routine care. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 100 and sophomore standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 211 - Introduction to Aquaculture


    Principles and practices of aquaculture from international, national and local perspectives. Includes field trip. (Students may not take both SMS 211 and AVS 211 for credit).

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge

    Prerequisites: BIO 100

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 231 - Sheep Management Cooperative


    Students will gain hands-on livestock experience through the management of a flock of sheep at University of Maine Witter Center.  Responsibilities will include grazing management, feeding, reproductive management, health, finances and marketing of animals for breeding stock, fiber, pelts and meat products.  Under the guidance of AVS Faculty, Witter Center staff and Sheep Club peer advisors, students will work together to manage the flock to optimize animal health and productivity.

    Prerequisites: AVS 145 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall and Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    AVS 249 - Laboratory and Companion Animal Science


    An introduction to laboratory and companion animal science. Species covered include dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians, rodents, ferrets, rabbits, and horses. Topics include characteristics of each species, welfare,  uses, anatomy, physiology, behavior, breeding, genetics, nutrition, health, handling, care and career opportunities.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in AVS 145 and Sophomore standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 253 - Principles of Western Riding


    An introduction to the western style of horseback riding, including history, theory, styles, equipment and training methods associated with the western horse and rider. Student will receive both lecture and riding instruction. Maybe repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 254 - Introduction to Animal Microbiomes


    This course introduces students to host-associated microbiomes; the genomic collection of bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses present in a host ecosystem.  In each lecture, we will focus on an anatomical location, and discuss the host and environmental pressures which select  for the resident microbial community. The material is primarily in animals (mammals, birds, fish, amphibians) but includes some human-specific comparisons.  This course will introduce ecological theories (e.g. environmental selection, neutral theory) in the context of microbial communities, the history of host-associated microbiology, and how technology has contributed to or limited our understanding of organisms and their critical role in our health and development.  The skill-set objectives includes group discussions, reading scientific literature, and scientific writing in a variety of styles and both technical and non-technical formats.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment

    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or BIO 208 or BMB 155 or BMB 280 or SMS 201; or instructor’s permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 303 - Equine Management Cooperative


    Work experience at the equine operation at the J.F. Witter Teaching and Research Center.  Students work in teams to manage the University equine herd, including feeding, nutrition, health management, retraining of donated horses, maintenance and marketing.

    Prerequisites:  Sophomore standing or Instructor’s Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 2
  
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    AVS 346 - Dairy Cattle Technology


    Fundamentals of applied dairy cattle management.  Areas covered include industry trends, lactation, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, health, housing and financial principles and practices involved in operating and managing a modern dairy herd.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in AVS 145.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 347 - Dairy Cattle Technology Laboratory


    Student will gain “hands-on” livestock experience through the management of the dairy herd at University of Maine Witter Farm. Responsibilities will include the feeding, milking, reproduction, health, finances and marketing of the cattle and milk products produced. Under the guidance of faculty, staff and student advisors, students evaluate herd performance, identify problems, form strategies and implement management decisions that affect the operation of the dairy. The first of a two-course sequence (with AVS 371, University Dairy Cooperative) involving dairy work experience at the Witter Farm. Lab 4. 

    Prerequisites: AVS 346 or concurrently.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 2
  
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    AVS 353 - Equine Reproduction and Breeding Management


    A survey of the reproductive biology of the horse and a discussion of horse breeding practices, including artificial insemination, semen evaluation and embryo transfer.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 368 - Independent Study in the Animal Sciences


    An in-depth study into a specific area to be approved by the staff advisor at time of registration. (1) breeding, (2) disease, (3) management, (4) nutrition, (5) physiology. Not more than five credit hours will be permitted toward graduation.

    Prerequisites: AVS 145 and permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar
  
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    AVS 371 - University Dairy Cooperative


    Students are responsible for the management of the University dairy herd, including: feeding, milking, reproduction, maintenance and marketing. Students, along with faculty advisors and the herdsperson, make management decisions that affect the day to day operation of the University dairy.

    Prerequisites: AVS 346 and AVS 347.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 4
  
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    AVS 393 - Training the Standardbred Horse


    An introduction to the standardbred harness racing industry with detailed instruction on training and management of the standardbred race horse.

    Prerequisites: sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 396 - Field Experience in Animal and Veterinary Science


    An approved program of work experience which contributes to the academic major for which academic credit is given. Students may work part time or full time for a semester in a job related to their professional career goals.

    (Pass/Fail Grade Only.)

    Prerequisites: permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1 - 16

  
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    AVS 397 - Equine Internship


    Field experience in the equine industry, or with an equine veterinarian.

    Prerequisites: AVS 303 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 1-4
  
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    AVS 401 - Senior Paper in Animal Science I


    An original investigation of a problem in animal science, under the guidance of a faculty member. Students are required to submit an experimental proposal describing their research, and present an oral report to faculty and students.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience Requirements when combined with AVS 402.

    Prerequisites: Senior Standing and ENG 315 or ENG 317

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 2
  
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    AVS 402 - Senior Paper in Animal Science II


    Students will prepare a final copy of work done in AVS 40  and present an oral report to faculty and students. Lec 2.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive and Capstone Experience Requirements when combined with AVS 401.

    Prerequisites: AVS 401 and CMJ 103 or equivalents and senior standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    AVS 405 - Livestock and Companion Animal Behavior


    Provides both theoretical and practical knowledge of livestock and companion animal behavior.  Enables students to understand why simple improvements in management practices can bring about tremendous changes in production and performance of the animals as well as improve the ease of handling for their human caregivers.  A background in the human-animal bond and the impact of humans on livestock and companion animals will be provided.  Designed for animal and veterinary scientists, graduate students interested in the human-animal bond and animal-assisted therapy, and those who wish to understand more about the behavior of their companion animals.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in AVS 145 and Junior standing

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 411 - Advanced Aquaculture


    Advanced aquaculture will build upon the foundations of the Introduction to Aquaculture course (AVS/SMS 211). Students will be exposed to more advanced concepts including aquaculture engineering and system design; broodstock management; live feeds and algae production; economics and marketing; as well as biosecurity. Application of principles and concepts presented in this class will be emphasized. At the conclusion of this course students should have a firm grasp of critical concepts in aquaculture and be better prepared for careers in private, state, and federal organizations as well as academia.

    Prerequisites: AVS 211 or SMS 211, or permission 

    Course Typically Offered: Spring 

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 433 - Equine Exercise Physiology


    Covers current concepts regarding the metabolic and physiologic factors associated with exercise and training the horse. Provides students with the scientific basis for properly designing a physical conditioning program for the equine athlete.

    Prerequisites: CHY 121 or BMB 207, BIO 208 or BIO 377 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Even Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 437 - Animal Diseases


    Introduction to the study of disease in animals, including the causes, pathology and control of diseases of domestic animals. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: BIO 377 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 446 - Forage Science and Range Management


    Participants will be introduced to the biological fundamentals needed for understanding and managing forage and grassland resources used to feed livestock and wildlife.

    AVS 446 and AVS 546 cannot both be taken for credit.

    General Education Requirements: None

    Prerequisites: AVS, SAG, BIO, BOL, or WLE major or permission and Senior Standing

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3

  
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    AVS 454 - DNA Sequencing Analysis Lab


    This course will take students from raw DNA sequencing data through quality assurance, through to data interpretation, statistical analysis, and presentation of the results as a mock scientific article.  A background in microbiology, microbial ecology, or genetics would be beneficial.  No programming or data analysis experience is required. Students who are performing research may bring their own sequencing data to process in class.  Students will become familiar with command-line programs and basic computer programming techniques; understand bioinformatics methods such as quality trimming, assembling contigs, sequence alignment, using reference databases, and statistical comparisons; gain hands-on experience in bioinformatic analysis of DNA sequences using the R platform and its packages; primarily, DADA2, phyloseq, vegan, ggplot2; and be able to apply the knowledge gained in class to other sequence types and programs. Students may bring their own data, or some can be provided.  AVS 454 and 554 cannot both be taken for credit.

    General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy

    Prerequisites: AVS 254 or BIO 319 or Bio 350 or BMB 280 or WLE 200 or SMS 300, and STS 232 or STS 215; or instructor’s permission

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    AVS 455 - Animal Nutrition


    An increased efficiency of nutrient use is not only imperative for achieving profitability in the currently globalized livestock markets, but also for the sustainable use of natural resources and climate change mitigation. Considering that around 70% of the costs of raising animals is due to feeding and that global demand for animal products is increasing, understanding the basic foundations of animal nutrition is essential for professionals that work with livestock, poultry, companion animals, and wildlife. This course will cover the biochemistry of nutrient use, gastrointestinal physiology and metabolism, feedstuff nutritional analysis, mathematical modeling of nutrient requirements, and the life-cycle of feeding animals. AVS 444 and AVS 555 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: Junior Standing; BMB 208 and BMB 210 or CHY 122 and CHY 124, and BIO 200 or BIO 208 or SMS 201

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 456 - Animal Nutrition Laboratory


    Animal nutrition is one of the areas in animal sciences with the highest job opportunities.  A solid background in applied animal nutrition is key for competitiveness within the animal industry considering that most of the costs of raising an animal come from feeding.  In this course students will have the opportunity to experience how to sample and process feeds, measure key nutrients, dissect and compare gastrointestinal tract structures across different species, measure feed utilization using animals, simulate digestion processes in the lab, and assess the safety and economic viability of conserved feeds. AVS 456 and AVS 556 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Corequisites: AVS 455

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
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    AVS 466 - Livestock Feeds and Feeding


    The practical application of nutrition to the production of livestock.  Topics discussed include feed types and sources, feed composition and quality, nutritional requirements of various livestock and the formulation and evaluation of rations to meet nutritional needs and optimize animal performance.

    Prerequisites: AVS 455

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 2
  
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    AVS 477 - Zoonoses and Animal Health


    This course focuses on the ecology, evolution and epidemiology of infectious diseases from a One Health perspective that considers wild and domestic animals, public health and ecosystem health.  Core biological principles as well as ecological and social issues will be explored.  The historical and contemporary literature in disease ecology and evolution as it relates to animal health will be reviewed, with an emphasis placed on wildlife and livestock diseases.  Additional topics covered include the factors driving heterogeneity in disease transmission in animal populations, the ecology of disease spillover in wildlife and livestock, host-pathogen evolution, antibiotic resistance, and animal disease management strategies.  AVS 477 and AVS 577 cannot both be taken for credit.

    Prerequisites: Senior Standing and AVS 437, BIO 319, SMS 300 or WLE 200

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    AVS 480 - Physiology of Reproduction


    Comparative development and functions of the reproductive process in domestic animals. Lec 3.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and Pre- or Co-requisite of BIO 377

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

Anthropology

  
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    ANT 101 - Introduction to Anthropology: Human Origins and Prehistory


    A survey course focusing on the evolution of humankind, the development of culture, and the beginnings of civilization. Required for Anthropology majors.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 102 - Introduction to Anthropology: Diversity of Cultures


    A survey course focusing on the nature of culture, similarities and differences among the world’s cultures, relationships among cultures, and culture change. Required for Anthropology majors.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 120 - Religions of the World


    A survey of the distinctive features of the major world religions and the most studied Native American, African and aboriginal Australian religions. Focuses on the fit between myth and ritual, the problems involved in trying to understand both “from the believer’s point of view,” and what generalizations can be made about religion in general.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 210 - Biological Anthropology


    Introduces current topics in human biology and evolution including human origins and the fossil record, human genetics and population variability, and human and non-human primate behavior.

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 212 - The Anthropology of Food


    Food is the most direct and meaningful connection people have with the environment, a connection that addresses both biological and cultural needs.  This course aims at exposing students to the different ways in which anthropologists think about food across its sub-disciplines as a way to understand human origins, behavior, and cultural diversity.  Themes include food procurement strategies, influence on human evolution, religious traditions and food, food as pertains to power dynamics, warfare, gender relations and identity, and the role of food in environmental and sustainable development policy-making.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 221 - Introduction to Folklore


    A survey of the different genres of folklore, its forms, uses, functions and modes of transmission. Emphasis on belief, custom and legend.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and the Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 225 - Climate Change, Societies and Cultures


    Surveys the human dimensions of climate change from a cultural perspective: The interactions among societies, cultures, and climate change. Reviews climate-change futures and their human implications around the world; drivers of climate change; and technological, social, and cultural mitigation and adaptations strategies. Perspective throughout is universalistic (all human societies, past and present) and holistic (all realms of thought and behavior, though with particular emphasis on social, political, and cultural dimensions).

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 235 - Cultural Perceptions of Nature


    Examines the concept of nature in a variety of cultural contexts.  Emphasis is on the development of contemporary views and their impacts on environmental management.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 240 - Hollywood Archaeology


    Archaeology is the systematic study of the past, particularly (but not exclusively) for times and places when and where writing did not exist. Many people find the ancient past romantic and exciting. Consequently, many movies purport to be about, or to involve, archaeology and archaeologists and/or the prehistoric past. Very often, movies propagate perspectives on the past and on the practice of archaeology that diverge widely from what archaeologists do and have learned. Often, movies portray archaeologists acting unethically. In this class, we will discuss the use and abuse of archaeology in Hollywood movies, how to recognize inappropriate and unethical archaeological behavior, what sort of stereotypes about archaeology and archaeologists these movies transmit, and how film might be a medium for a better presentation of archaeology and prehistory.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 245 - Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective


    An exploration into the commonality and diversity of sex and gender roles in cross-cultural perspective and an examination of cultural and bio-social explanations for why such diversity exists.  Foci include contemporary approaches to sex and gender, changing views about men’s and women’s roles in human evolution, the conditions under which gender roles vary in contemporary societies and the issues surrounding gender equality, power and politics.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Ethics

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 249 - Religion and Violence


    Explores the anthropology of contemporary political violence. The ethnographic study of terrorism, guerilla warfare, state terror and human rights will be complemented by examination of the ethical and methodological concerns that arise in this special area of investigation.

    General Education Requirements: Ethics, Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 250 - Conservation Anthropology: The Socio-Cultural Dimension of Environmental Issues


    Conservation is fundamentally a socio-cultural problem.  Examines the different types of human/nature relationships that emerge across various cultural, environmental, socio-economic, and political contexts.  Through a comparative approach this course is designed to illustrate how culture is an important variable when creating viable conservation strategies.  Themes covered in class include protected areas, indigenous and traditional knowledge, resource management, market-based conservation, environmental economics, and political ecology.  Case studies: United States, Africa, Australia, Latin America, and Papua New Guinea.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 252 - Civilization in South Asia


    An exploration into the nature of civilization in South Asia, focusing on India. The central religious tradition of Hinduism and the caste order are investigated, with complementary perspectives provided by non-Hindu traditions. The impact of colonialism and development of national identities are also considered. Anthropological views are distinguished from and supplemented by other disciplinary perspectives.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Social Contexts and Institutions

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 256 - Ethnic Conflict


    An exploration of ethnic conflict and revival today including a survey of anthropological theories of ethnicity, focusing on ethnic revival in the modern world. European and other ethnic groups of the industrialized West provide the major cases to be considered.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 260 - Forensic Anthropology


    Provides an introduction to the application of the theory and methods of physical anthropology to medicolegal investigations and problems.  The field consists of four basic topics: 1) human skeletal anatomy, 2) developing a biological profile, 3) the science of decomposition, and 4) forensic anthropology in the court system.

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 261 - Islamic Fundamentalism


    A survey of the distinctive ideological and social features of Islamic fundamentalist movements.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 270 - Environmental Justice Movements in the United States


    Examines how poor and racialized communities have responded to the incidence, causes, and effects of environmental racism and injustice.  Special attention will be given to how critiques offered by these communities challenge the knowledge and procedural forms of justice embedded in environmental policy and democracy in the United States.  Case studies will be drawn from readings on African-American, European-Americans, Chicano and Latino Americans, and Native Americans.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 285 - Introduction to Historic Preservation


    This course introduces students to the theory, history, legal framework, and cultural contexts of historic preservation.  It focuses primarily on historic preservation in the United States with reference to historic preservation topics worldwide.  From UMaine’s Lord Hall to Stonehenge, students will explore historic places through an anthropological lens in order to understand why and how humans preserve heritage-based places.  The course is designed to give students a basic knowledge of U.S. historic preservation laws, policies, and practices.  It also encourages students to think critically about social behavior surrounding place-based heritage.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 290 - Special Topics in Anthropology


    Intermediate treatment of specialized problems in anthropology with emphasis on analysis in frontier areas of anthropological research.  Topics vary.  May be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 295 - American Indians and Climate Change


    Introduces students to the Indian cultures of the United States and U.S. territories in the South Pacific, paying particular attention to the issue of climate change and how it is impacting indigenous peoples in these regions; also examines climate effects on natural resource conditions as it relates to Indian cultures and the roles indigenous groups play in policy responses to climate change.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 311 - Geography of Climate Change


    Introduces students to theories of environmental sustainability transitions and resource use in the context of climate change.

    Prerequisites: Any ANT or GEO course or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
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    ANT 317 - Fundamentals of Archaeology


    Techniques of excavation and analysis; theoretical basis of methods and fundamental principles; application to specific case studies; the use of geological, biological, chemical and other tools in archaeological research. A one-day compulsory weekend field trip to local archaeological sites.

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

    Prerequisites: ANT 101 or ANT 170  or ANT 207 or permission. Required for Anthropology majors.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 330 - The U.S. Folk Experience


    Examines how disenfranchised groups respond through their traditional expressive folklore to the incidences, causes and effect of racism and injustice found in the United States, as well as maintaining and conveying their values, and sense of identity at simultaneous levels (individual, communal, regional) to each other and the larger society.  Groups read and examined are Afro-American, Hispanic, Asian American, Native American, and Euro-American.

    General Education Requirements: Western Cultural Tradition and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 350 - Mediterranean Ancient Landscapes Modern World


    Humans are active agents in the physical world and play a pivotal role in its transformation.  Consequently, contemporary societies inherit landscapes that are the product of an integrated, long-term relationship between humans and their environment through time.  This is of particular interest in the Mediterranean world not only because cultural complexity, urbanization, and the origins of nation-states and empires unfolded over the course of millennia, but also because of the rich historical, archaeological, and paleoenvironmental records that help to characterize this process.  This course introduces the ways in which archaeology and other historical sciences can inform on contemporary issues of resource management, conservation and cultural heritage in the Mediterranean in the context of the global change.

    Prerequisites: One ANT course  or one  GEO course or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 372 - North American Prehistory


    The history of North American native peoples from the first evidence to the arrival of the Europeans. Emphasis on major culture areas and issues such as glacial and postglacial adaptation, development of agriculture, and the emergence of sedentism.

    Prerequisites:  ANT 101 or  ANT 207 or  ANT 317 or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 400 - Basic Theory in Cultural Anthropology


    A seminar in which the most important theories shaping modern cultural and social anthropology will be presented through the analysis of key monographs. Emphasis placed on developing critical thinking and library research skills. Required of all Anthropology majors.

    General Education Requirements: Social Context and Institutions, Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Permission, and ANT 102 and ANT major standing.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 410 - Human Dimensions of Climate Change


    Surveys advanced topics on the human dimensions of climate change, including anthropogenic drivers and consequences of climate change, mitigation, and adaptation strategies.

    General Education Requirements: Population and Environment and Capstone

    Prerequisites: ANT 102 and ANT 225 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 422 - Folklore of Maine and The Maritime Provinces


    This course covers the major genres of folklore: material culture, verbal expressions, folksong, narrative, performance, revivals and tourism within the major linguistic traditions: English, French, Native American, and other immigrant groups of the Northeast.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: ANT 221

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 426 - Native American Folklore


    An overview of folklore and folklife covering various genres of traditional expressive culture.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 430 - Who Owns Native Cultures?


    The answer to the simple question of who owns Native American / American Indian / indigenous cultures and cultural productions is surprisingly complex and engages the history of anthropology and the nature of anthropological knowledge itself.  Course examines the evolving relationships between anthropologists, historians, and other researchers with indigenous peoples (in particular American Indians) and what kinds of ethical and legal relationships have evolved over time to address this question.  Also looks at the ways in which contemporary cultural resource management by indigenous peoples serves as a key articulation of indigenous nationhood and sovereignty.  Special attention is given to recent scholarship by indigenous researchers that decolonizes standard academic practices and roots the ownership of Native cultures and research in Native communities.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: ANT 102 or NAS 101 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 431 - Folklore, the Environment and Public Policy


    Examines the interaction of humans with the environment from the perspective of folklore, and reviews its impact on public policy at the local, state, federal and international level.

    General Education Requirements: Population and the Environment

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 448 - Ethnography Through Film


    A critical analysis of film from an anthropological perspective. Students will be introduced to the history of the use of ethnographic film in anthropology, and they will consider how professional anthropologists living at different times have used motion pictures to capture aspects of human cultural behavior. Students will also examine how ethnographic films, documentaries, and popular motion pictures (past and present) have been used to represent people in a variety of cultures. We will ask how professional anthropologists may differ from other types of filmmakers in their treatment of the same cultural groups and/or subjects.

    General Education Requirements: Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ANT 102 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 451 - Native American Cultures and Identities


    In this seminar, we will examine Native American cultures and identities (past and present), with special attention to reading works by Native authors and examining topics such as the effects of colonialism on Native Americans, representations of Native Americans in popular culture, new biological technologies like DNA testing that shape understandings of Native identities, the role of traditional cultures in Native communities, tribal sovereignty and economic development in the twenty-first century, and indigenous environmental perspectives.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: ANT 102 or NAS 101 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 459 - Peoples and Cultures of South America


    Social, political, economic and religious institutions of native and mestizo peoples in South America, using examples from selected areas (Amazonian lowlands, Andean highlands, southern cone.) Traditional culture patterns and modern developments and problems, including syncretism of European and native systems and role of modern beliefs about pre-European lifeways.

    General Education Requirements:  Social Context and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: ANT 102

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 460 - Research Design & Methods


    This seminar course for upper level undergraduate students emphasizes the integration of social science theories and methods for the development of research proposals. In this course, students define a research problem, identify a set of research questions or hypotheses, and design a plan of action to carry out their own research. In the process, students become familiar with research ethics, IRB protocols, and a suite of methodological tools used by anthropologists and others to produce social science research. In-class discussions allow students to critically assess benefits and limitations of various field methods, qualitative vs. quantitative approaches, and analytical techniques. In-class workshops allow students to discuss their own research ideas on a regular basis with classmates and instructor. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of the research process while gaining hands-on experience designing, researching, writing, and presenting their work while building relationships with faculty and peers. The course will allow students to engage in anthropological inquiries and debates while honing skills in communication, argumentation, and problem solving that will be useful beyond the classroom.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Permission is required.  Junior or Senior standing in the Anthropology or International Affairs (CCG concentration) or Human Dimensions of Climate Change majors.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 464 - Ecological Anthropology


    Comparative study of human populations in ecosystems. Topics include the adaptive nature of culture, implications of the ecological approach for anthropological theory, sociocultural evolution and change, and contemporary problems. Case studies from simple and complex societies. ANT 464 and 564 cannot both be taken for degree credit.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions, Population and the Environment, and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ANT 102 or ANT 250 or Permission

     

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    ANT 466 - Economic Anthropology


    Comparative study of production, consumption and exchange in selected Western and non-Western societies.  Emphasis on factors influencing economic decisions in a variety of social and cultural settings. ANT 466 and ANT 566 cannot both be taken for degree credit.

    General Education Requirements: Social Contexts and Institutions and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ANT 102 or ANT 300 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 476 - The Ancient Maya


    Examines the origins and development of ancient Maya civilization beginning with precursors to Maya culture in the first two millennia BC and ending with the final conquest of the last independent Maya kingdom in 1697.  Among the topics covered will be the rise of complex society in the Maya region, the history of individual Maya city-states and rulers, social and political organization, art and religion, craft production and economy, commoner life, hieroglyphic writing, human-environment dynamics, and the Classic Maya collapse.

    General Education Requirements:  Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: ANT 101 or ANT 170 or ANT 207 or Permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 477 - Field Research in Archaeology


    Introduction to archaeological field techniques through excavation of an archaeological site. Intensive training in site survey, excavations techniques, recording, analysis and preliminary interpretation of archaeological materials. Generally conducted on prehistoric and historic sites in Maine. Admission by application only.

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Prerequisites: Permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Summer

    Credits: 2-6
  
  •  

    ANT 478 - Zooarchaeology


    A laboratory course covering techniques for analysis and interpretation of osteological remains from archaeological sites. Rec 2, Lab 2.

    General Education Requirements: Basic or Applied Sciences

    Prerequisites: ANT 317 or permission.

    Course Typically Offered: Not Regularly Offered

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ANT 479 - Laboratory Techniques in Prehistoric Archaeology


    Hands-on experience in lab techniques using real archaeological materials. Includes analysis, classification and synthesis of the data. Lec 1, Lab 2.

    General Education Requirements: Applications of Scientific Knowledge

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 490 - Topics in Anthropology


    Advanced treatment of specialized problems in anthropology with emphasis on analysis in frontier areas of anthropological research. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Typically Offered: Variable

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 493 - Anthropology Senior Seminar & Capstone Research Project


    This senior research seminar is designed to give students an opportunity to draw on their academic experience and explore a particular anthropological topic or debate of their choice.  Throughout the course of the semester, students will conduct research and work toward the completion of a research project.  This project will allow students to gain valuable hands-on experience designing, researching, writing, and presenting your work while building relationships with faculty and peers.  The course will allow students to engage in anthropological inquires and debates while honing skills in communication, argumentation, and problem solving that will be useful beyond the classroom.  Weekly discussions, journal entries, a final project (submitted in stages), and a presentation will be used to assess student progress.

    General Education Requirements: Capstone and Writing Intensive

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing in the Anthropology or International Affairs (CCG concentration) or Human Dimensions of Climate Change majors.

    Course Typically Offered: Spring
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 494 - Method and Theory in Archaeology


    The history of, and current debates in, archaeological methods and theory, with a focus on Americanist archaeology.

    Prerequisites: ANT 300 or  ANT 317 or permission

    Course Typically Offered: Alternate Years

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANT 497 - Department Projects


    A special project course. Specific content, scheduling and credit hours proposed by student in consultation with instructor. Maximum of 3 credit hours.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: Ar

Arabic

  
  •  

    ARA 101 - Elementary Arabic I


    A systematic study of the basics of the Arabic language. Equal emphasis is placed on developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Culture is also an integral component of this course. Intended for students with no prior study of Arabic or fewer than two years in high school. This course is the first of 2-semester sequence.

    General Education Requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 5
  
  •  

    ARA 102 - Elementary Arabic II


    A systematic study of the basics of the Arabic language. Equal emphasis is placed on developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Culture is also an integral component of this course.  Intended for students who have successfully completed ARA 101.  This course is the second of a 2-semester sequence.

    General Education Requirements:  Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives

    Course Typically Offered: Spring

    Credits: 5

Art

  
  •  

    ART 100 - Drawing I


    The fundamentals of drawing through creative exercises exploring the principles of line, value, texture, space, and form. Examines various media and their relationship to expression and composition. Lab 6.

    General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Artistic and Creative Expression Requirement.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ART 104 - Successful Strategies for Visual Arts Majors


    A course for First Year and Transfer Students majoring in Studio Art, Art Education, or History of Art, ART 104 will introduce students to effective strategies for success is the Visual Arts. Students will learn how to develop proficiencies in creativity, strong work practices, essential artistic and writing skills, and effective critical thinking.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ART 110 - 2-D Design


    Fundamentals of basic design through studio experience. Covers analysis of design, composition and basic perceptual and aesthetic aspects of color. Uses a series of problems that explore the areas listed above. Lab 6.

    General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ART 120 - 3-D Design


    An introduction to the fundamentals of three dimensional design including volume, mass, line, plane, space and time. Uses a series of problems that explore the areas listed above. Lab 6.

    General Education Requirements:  Artistic and Creative Expression

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ART 180 - Photography I


    Fundamentals of black and white photography, including film processing, printing and print control, camera basics, exposure, photographic history, lighting, and the art of photography. Lab 6.

    Prerequisites: Art majors must have permission of advisor.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ART 182 - Photography and Digital Imaging


    A basic course in photography that includes use of computers as part of the process. Covers basic principles such as lighting, color and selective focus. Includes material on different photographic processes including digital processes.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ART 200 - Drawing II


    A continuation of the fundamentals of drawing in black and white media and the introduction of a variety of color media with continued emphasis on their relationship to expression and composition. Lab 6.

    Prerequisites: ART 100.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ART 220 - Sculpture I


    A series of projects that investigate the techniques and process approach in sculpture. Includes welding, carving, casting, forming and other forms of fabrication. General use of hand and power equipment.  

    Prerequisites: ART 110, ART 120, ART 200.

    Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring

    Credits: 3
 

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